rvveh
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On social media I’ve seen sooo many people complain how bad/how hard/how much work they have to do in sixth form and I’m just wondering if it is really that bad?
Ive applied for A-level philosophy, history and sociology and if anyone is doing any of those subjects maybe drop some information as to what its like? For example how much homework do you get a week, also how many hours you work after school etc. Much appreciated!!
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_xChlox_
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Hey, year 13 Sociology student here. I’m not gonna sugar coat it, GCSEs are a walk in the park compared to A levels. They’re very content heavy and require a lot of hard work. Firstly, When u first go into them done get dishearten at the fact you may start of with grades you aren’t happy with, it happens to the best of us. I’ve got my fair share of Es and Us but I’m now currently working at an A/B which I’m happy with.

Sociology A level is amazing! It’s changed my perspective of the world and make me so much more of an informed and accepting person. We don’t get too much homework, at this stage of the course the majority of the homework is our own revision which my teacher asks to see every so often to make sure we’re staying on track. It does require several hours a week during learning content to get to know it in depth. There are lots of theories and names to learn to bear that in mind but if you enjoy it (like me) then revising isn’t a pain because it’s fun (to an extent).
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Telomere7
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(Original post by Alanasmith)
On social media I’ve seen sooo many people complain how bad/how hard/how much work they have to do in sixth form and I’m just wondering if it is really that bad?
Ive applied for A-level philosophy, history and sociology and if anyone is doing any of those subjects maybe drop some information as to what its like? For example how much homework do you get a week, also how many hours you work after school etc. Much appreciated!!
I'm in year 13 and I do Philosophy. I've found it extremely interesting, but some concepts/arguments/ideas etc can be initially quite challenging to get your head round. There is an element of just memorising arguments, but it really demands a good understanding of the small details as well as the big picture in order to write a good essay. Make sure you are consolidating everything as you go along, as trying to just memorise arguments without understanding them first will not get you very far.
Hope that helps and good luck!
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clueIxss
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(Original post by Alanasmith)
On social media I’ve seen sooo many people complain how bad/how hard/how much work they have to do in sixth form and I’m just wondering if it is really that bad?
Ive applied for A-level philosophy, history and sociology and if anyone is doing any of those subjects maybe drop some information as to what its like? For example how much homework do you get a week, also how many hours you work after school etc. Much appreciated!!
Hiya! I did my A-Levels last year, and I didn't do Philosophy/Sociology, but I did do History and can provide some info on A-Levels in general. I think that people do have a point in saying they're hard because the content is a real step up from GCSEs, it's sadly just a fact because it's a higher level qualification. Although, I didn't find the exams as hard to do as GCSEs, because there weren't as many- I went from 20 to 8, so much less intense! Emotionally, they were a lot more taxing though because of what they represented (getting into Uni or not compared to just getting into sixth form) and just because it takes longer to understand the content.

For History, I'm not sure what time periods you're studying, but I have a couple of prominent things to say about it. First of all, essay structure is A LOT MORE IMPORTANT than it was at GCSE. And it was still pretty important at GCSE, so that should tell you something. Your teachers will definitely help you with that, but it's on you to make sure you really have a good go at the essays they set and develop your skills. Your exam board looks for specific numbers of quality points backed up with evidence from your own knowledge, and you really have to make sure you refer back to the question after every point- I promise it's not repetitive to just write the question again and again, they like to see it because they know you're paying attention to it.

My other point about History is that it is VERY content heavy. You really do need to know a lot of the stuff to use as evidence in your essays (key dates/people/events/hows and whys of events and things/etc.) which can be very difficult to condense and remember. To do well, they expect you to be able to use specific evidence that supports or does not support what the question is saying. Mind maps and summary tables are your friend!

Hope any of this is helpful. Sorry it's a bit long and is probably a bit scary to hear, and I won't pretend I think A-Levels should be this way. It's hard, but it is possible to do well, and some people do find them easy so it's not everyone!
Last edited by clueIxss; 1 year ago
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rvveh
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(Original post by clueIxss)
Hiya! I did my A-Levels last year, and I didn't do Philosophy/Sociology, but I did do History and can provide some info on A-Levels in general. I think that people do have a point in saying they're hard because the content is a real step up from GCSEs, it's sadly just a fact because it's a higher level qualification. Although, I didn't find the exams as hard to do as GCSEs, because there weren't as many- I went from 20 to 8, so much less intense! Emotionally, they were a lot more taxing though because of what they represented (getting into Uni or not compared to just getting into sixth form) and just because it takes longer to understand the content.

For History, I'm not sure what time periods you're studying, but I have a couple of prominent things to say about it. First of all, essay structure is A LOT MORE IMPORTANT than it was at GCSE. And it was still pretty important at GCSE, so that should tell you something. Your teachers will definitely help you with that, but it's on you to make sure you really have a good go at the essays they set and develop your skills. Your exam board looks for specific numbers of quality points backed up with evidence from your own knowledge, and you really have to make sure you refer back to the question after every point- I promise it's not repetitive to just write the question again and again, they like to see it because they know you're paying attention to it.

My other point about History is that it is VERY content heavy. You really do need to know a lot of the stuff to use as evidence in your essays (key dates/people/events/hows and whys of events and things/etc.) which can be very difficult to condense and remember. To do well, they expect you to be able to use specific evidence that supports or does not support what the question is saying. Mind maps and summary tables are your friend!

Hope any of this is helpful. Sorry it's a bit long and is probably a bit scary to hear, and I won't pretend I think A-Levels should be this way. It's hard, but it is possible to do well, and some people do find them easy so it's not everyone!
Thank you. This was extremely helpful!!
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rvveh
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(Original post by Telomere7)
I'm in year 13 and I do Philosophy. I've found it extremely interesting, but some concepts/arguments/ideas etc can be initially quite challenging to get your head round. There is an element of just memorising arguments, but it really demands a good understanding of the small details as well as the big picture in order to write a good essay. Make sure you are consolidating everything as you go along, as trying to just memorise arguments without understanding them first will not get you very far.
Hope that helps and good luck!
Thank you!!!
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rvveh
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(Original post by _xChlox_)
Hey, year 13 Sociology student here. I’m not gonna sugar coat it, GCSEs are a walk in the park compared to A levels. They’re very content heavy and require a lot of hard work. Firstly, When u first go into them done get dishearten at the fact you may start of with grades you aren’t happy with, it happens to the best of us. I’ve got my fair share of Es and Us but I’m now currently working at an A/B which I’m happy with.

Sociology A level is amazing! It’s changed my perspective of the world and make me so much more of an informed and accepting person. We don’t get too much homework, at this stage of the course the majority of the homework is our own revision which my teacher asks to see every so often to make sure we’re staying on track. It does require several hours a week during learning content to get to know it in depth. There are lots of theories and names to learn to bear that in mind but if you enjoy it (like me) then revising isn’t a pain because it’s fun (to an extent).
Thanks!!!
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Bluerainy
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Social media exaggerates everything. It's a bit harder than gcse but still very manageable.
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username4648086
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Social media has that tendency to 'exaggerate' since the social media users find it difficult to cut back the time wasted on social media.
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