ThiagoBrigido
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I'm not sure about the question below. I tried to use integration twice so could find an expression for displacement and evaluate at the referred time. Clearly is not the right approach.

A particle starts from rest and moves with acceleration ((2+e^-2t)i)+(4e^-2t)j. Find its distance from the initial position after 1.2 seconds.
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ThomH97
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That is a 'correct' approach. The only potential hiccup I can see without seeing your working is putting in the 'starts from rest' condition after the first integration.
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ThiagoBrigido
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I haven't evaluated after the first integration.
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ThiagoBrigido
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(Original post by ThomH97)
That is a 'correct' approach. The only potential hiccup I can see without seeing your working is putting in the 'starts from rest' condition after the first integration.
What do you mean?
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ThomH97
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When you integrate, you should have a constant. Well, one for i and another for j. Evaluate these using the fact that it 'starts from rest'.

The reason this matters is because a particle already moving a million metres per second but subject to the same acceleration is going to travel about a million metres further than one that starts at rest.
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