Mental Health - has the pendulum swung too far the other way?

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David Getling
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Not too long ago most people would have been deeply ashamed to admit to mental health problems. OK, maybe this wasn't a good thing, but am I the only one who is wondering whether things have now swung too far the other way?

These days, claiming mental health issues seems to be a catch-all excuse for almost anything?
  • Too lazy to get out of bed in the morning. Blame mental health.
  • Haven't got the self discipline to apply oneself to ones studies. Blame mental health.
  • Doing drugs, or too much booze. Blame mental heath.

The list goes on and on. It seems that it's now become non PC to ever suggest that someone is lacking in character and moral fibre. We only have vulnerable people. And I've lost count of the number of times people on these forums seem only too ready to attribute their problems to mental health issues, rather than take any responsibility for having gotten themselves into their predicament.

Sometimes one even feels that claiming mental health issues has become a fashion accessory.
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AnonymousNoMore
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(Original post by David Getling)
Not too long ago most people would have been deeply ashamed to admit to mental health problems. OK, maybe this wasn't a good thing, but am I the only one who is wondering whether things have now swung too far the other way?

These days, claiming mental health issues seems to be a catch-all excuse for almost anything?
  • Too lazy to get out of bed in the morning. Blame mental health.
  • Haven't got the self discipline to apply oneself to ones studies. Blame mental health.
  • Doing drugs, or too much booze. Blame mental heath.

The list goes on and on. It seems that it's now become non PC to ever suggest that someone is lacking in character and moral fibre. We only have vulnerable people. And I've lost count of the number of times people on these forums seem only too ready to attribute their problems to mental health issues, rather than take any responsibility for having gotten themselves into their predicament.

Sometimes one even feels that claiming mental health issues has become a fashion accessory.
I don't know anymore, I think a lot of mental illnesses have become just buzzwords, so someone who feels sad is now depressed. When in actuality their chemixal/ hormone levels are absolutely correct.
I don't think mental illness has been downgraded just people over use the words to make themselves feel unique.
Just my opinion though.
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999tigger
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(Original post by David Getling)
Not too long ago most people would have been deeply ashamed to admit to mental health problems. OK, maybe this wasn't a good thing, but am I the only one who is wondering whether things have now swung too far the other way?

These days, claiming mental health issues seems to be a catch-all excuse for almost anything?
  • Too lazy to get out of bed in the morning. Blame mental health.
  • Haven't got the self discipline to apply oneself to ones studies. Blame mental health.
  • Doing drugs, or too much booze. Blame mental heath.

The list goes on and on. It seems that it's now become non PC to ever suggest that someone is lacking in character and moral fibre. We only have vulnerable people. And I've lost count of the number of times people on these forums seem only too ready to attribute their problems to mental health issues, rather than take any responsibility for having gotten themselves into their predicament.

Sometimes one even feels that claiming mental health issues has become a fashion accessory.
Nope you are just ignorant and unhealthy about looking at the the nature and impact of mental health issues.
Why should someone feel ashamed of having a MH issue as you claim?
Lacking in character and moral fibre, absolutely hilarious.
People dont automatically blame MH, but it is worthwhile investigating and asking why people behave the way they do.
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MidgetFever
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Honestly, this sounds almost a little ignorant to me. Perhaps because I have struggled with these things my entire life. The issue with mental health is that you never understand what a person is going through until you go through it yourself. You can't sit there and just say 'oh it's an excuse for everything now' if you haven't experienced it yourself.

It does effect your ability to get out of bed. It does effect your ability to study. Regardless of how trivial these things may sound, you can't just wake up and say "well I'm going to have a grand ol day tomorrow!" You're massively understating how hard it is to resolve our "predicaments".
Last edited by MidgetFever; 1 month ago
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David Getling
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Why should someone feel ashamed of having a MH issue as you claim?
Read what I said carefully, not what you would like to imagine I said.
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glassalice
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(Original post by David Getling)
Not too long ago most people would have been deeply ashamed to admit to mental health problems. OK, maybe this wasn't a good thing, but am I the only one who is wondering whether things have now swung too far the other way?

These days, claiming mental health issues seems to be a catch-all excuse for almost anything?
  • Too lazy to get out of bed in the morning. Blame mental health.
  • Haven't got the self discipline to apply oneself to ones studies. Blame mental health.
  • Doing drugs, or too much booze. Blame mental heath.

The list goes on and on. It seems that it's now become non PC to ever suggest that someone is lacking in character and moral fibre. We only have vulnerable people. And I've lost count of the number of times people on these forums seem only too ready to attribute their problems to mental health issues, rather than take any responsibility for having gotten themselves into their predicament.

Sometimes one even feels that claiming mental health issues has become a fashion accessory.
To an extent yeah I do feel like that.
Everyone has struggles and that's OK. But I feel like too often ppl are complaining about 'the human condition' and some how expecting it to be fixed by 'professionals'.
Part of some celebraties branding is mental health.
TBH I think there should be a distinction between the struggles of being human and mental illness
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gjd800
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nah
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999tigger
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(Original post by David Getling)
Read what I said carefully, not what you would like to imagine I said.
I did, you raised the issue and possibility.
I never see you offering any help on the MH issue threads, people should feel put off by being able to voice their concerns and worries about MH on TSR by attitudes like yours. There is no harm in taking them seriously and referring them to an expert or professional. Feeling intimidated to discuss such issues is unhealthy.
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glassalice
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I did, you raised the issue and possibility.
I never see you offering any help on the MH issue threads, people should feel put off by being able to voice their concerns and worries about MH on TSR by attitudes like yours. There is no harm in taking them seriously and referring them to an expert or professional. Feeling intimidated to discuss such issues is unhealthy.
Do you not think there is a massive distinction between someone who is struggling emotionally and someone who is actually has an illness???
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999tigger
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(Original post by glassalice)
Do you not think there is a massive distinction between someone who is struggling emotionally and someone who is actually has an illness???
Youd need to give me the situation. Someone upset because they had GCSE exam disappointment is one thing, someone who then goes off and attempts to kill themselves is another. I dont see any harm and think its healthy they are listened to and then if its not something they can cope with they get help or a diagnosis to ensure they overcome. Being told you dont have enough moral fibre doesnt help because not everyone is the same.
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glassalice
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Youd need to give me the situation. Someone upset because they had GCSE exam disappointment is one thing, someone who then goes off and attempts to kill themselves is another. I dont see any harm and think its healthy they are listened to and then if its not something they can cope with they get help or a diagnosis to ensure they overcome. Being told you dont have enough moral fibre doesnt help because not everyone is the same.
Yeah of cause, to talk is a very good thing and ppl should not be discouraged. I would like to pick you up on a point though, suicide doesn't *nessicarly* mean someone has a mental health issue and in that case there is a limit on what can be legally and morally done to provent such an action.
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999tigger
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(Original post by glassalice)
Yeah of cause, to talk is a very good thing and ppl should not be discouraged. I would like to pick you up on a point though, suicide doesn't *nessicarly* mean someone has a mental health issue and in that case there is a limit on what can be legally and morally done to provent such an action.
I think any doctor would disagree with you that there wasnt sufficient cause for concern , especially if it was with a child.
Nope there wouldnt be a limit morally or legally because you would get in the experts to protect the interests of the child.
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Just my opinion
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If all this carries on the government will be issuing blue disability badges for anxious drivers because worrying if you will find a parking space when you get somewhere can make you anxious. 🤗

Oh no wait....what's this....?
https://www.google.com/search?q=blue...obile&ie=UTF-8
Last edited by Just my opinion; 1 month ago
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David Getling
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(Original post by glassalice)
suicide doesn't *necessarily* mean someone has a mental health issue
How very true. If you had a serious illness that took away your mobility and/or left you in constant pain you might well feel that a painless and dignified end was far more preferable.
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_gcx
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what does blaming mental health even mean?
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glassalice
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I think any doctor would disagree with you that there wasnt sufficient cause for concern , especially if it was with a child.
Nope there wouldnt be a limit morally or legally because you would get in the experts to protect the interests of the child.
I am well versed with the mental health system. For a child, yes it is different. However simplisticly if an adult was hell bent on killing them selves and they had no *mental disorder* (different definition to mental illness) they would be unsectionable, so there is nothing in that case that could be legally done.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
If this carries on the government will be issuing blue disability badges for anxious drivers because worrying if you will find a parking space when you get somewhere can make you anxious.

Oh no wait....what's this....
https://www.google.com/search?q=blue...obile&ie=UTF-8
Except not all anxiety is the same and for some it is a debilitating condition.

Blue badges are very hard to get and carefully checked. frivolous claims are just rejected.
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999tigger
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(Original post by glassalice)
I am well versed with the mental health system. For a child, yes it is different. However simplisticly if an adult was hell bent on killing them selves and they had no *mental disorder* (different definition to mental illness) they would be unsectionable, so there is nothing in that case that could be legally done.
I believe the OP refers to people on TSR which would be children and young adults for the most part considering the examples used and the fact he refers to TSR.

I am not sure what the relevance of your point is? that a determined adult can kill themselves eventually? So what?
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glassalice
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I believe the OP refers to people on TSR which would be children and young adults for the most part considering the examples used and the fact he refers to TSR.

I am not sure what the relevance of your point is? that a determined adult can kill themselves eventually? So what?
The relivance is that you said that 'attempting to kill yourself' means your ill.
I don't know the legal process however, the person still wouldn't be sectionable. It would *probably* come under child protection...
Last edited by glassalice; 1 month ago
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999tigger
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(Original post by glassalice)
The relivance is that you said that 'attempting to kill yourself' means your ill.
For the purposes of TSR that is not an unreasonable assumption.
For the purposes of adults it would warrant investigation.
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