Non-aspies what are our biggest giveaways???

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glassalice
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Just out of interest--in the eyes of someone without aspergers/asd, what are the biggest giveaways that someone has aspergers?
Or even if you have asd how do *you* detect it in others?
Be specific, examples much appreciated. No use being vague.
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OddOnes
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Lack of filter. So unnecessary rude verbal comments that come across as extremely blunt.

And extreme mathematical ability.
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Obolinda
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I can't really think of anything, lol

(Original post by OddOnes)
Lack of filter. So unnecessary rude verbal comments that come across as extremely blunt.
Maybe this :dontknow:
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999tigger
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(Original post by glassalice)
Just out of interest--in the eyes of someone without aspergers/asd, what are the biggest giveaways that someone has aspergers?
Or even if you have asd how do *you* detect it in others?
Be specific, examples much appreciated. No use being vague.
Obviously there a large range.
Lack of self awareness and non understanding/obliviousness to social situations. Makes them look like they dont listen and are rude. It just seems odd to rude and continues. It is very tricky as friends will know , expect and tolerate, but strangers may not.
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The-judge-16
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(Original post by OddOnes)
Lack of filter. So unnecessary rude verbal comments that come across as extremely blunt.

And extreme mathematical ability.
Actually that is where you are wrong in some respects, yes some aspies are incredible at maths, however some aren’t they excel in other areas such as music or arts. Savant syndrome is a medical condition in which someone displays exceptional skills amongst they’re overall disability, however every savants skill is different (many savants are autistic by the way). Search savant syndrome on google!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by glassalice)
Just out of interest--in the eyes of someone without aspergers/asd, what are the biggest giveaways that someone has aspergers?
Or even if you have asd how do *you* detect it in others?
Be specific, examples much appreciated. No use being vague.
Aspergers is very different in males and females. The replies you're going to get are going to be pretty stereotypically male, I imagine.

In fact your last sentence is fairly autistic. Rather blunt and without any social niceties. More subtle things I would say include being easily distracted by small things like the noise of a fan, or a shaft of light coming through a window, even mid conversation.

Also, needing to know in great detail plans before being able to go somewhere. So if you went to a restaurant with an autistic person, they'd need to know exactly when you were going and the route you were going to take, what the seating is like, being able to see the menu beforehand, probably looking up what the building looks like on google maps and the route... Not comfortable with spur-of-the-moment, or impulsive things.
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glassalice
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(Original post by Obolinda)
I can't really think of anything, lol


Maybe this :dontknow:
That's an interesting choice of symbol for this question.... I mean it could represent stiming.
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Tsrloulou
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Lack of casual eye contact during conversations I feel like is quite a big giveaway. Neurotypicals tend to maintain eye contact, but wonder their eyes briefly every 5-10 or so seconds. I think eye contact when talking to someone is considered ‘normal’ but non - stop staring isn’t and neither is constantly darting eyes between the persons eyes and their surroundings.
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londonmyst
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Excellent powers of recall, very skilled at memorising long pages of text/lyrics and able to learn complicated foreign languages easily.
Usually literal thinkers, rather tactless within a social context and will not tolerate obvious contradiction.
Very high pain endurance levels.
Some of the more sadistically inclined can take a lot of pleasure in verbally humiliating someone considered "stupid" or "a soft hearted sucker", to the point of relentless premeditated bullying/harassment/illegal online trolling.
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Chocca
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Hi fellow Aspies
Last edited by Chocca; 1 month ago
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glassalice
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Aspergers is very different in males and females. The replies you're going to get are going to be pretty stereotypically male, I imagine.

In fact your last sentence is fairly autistic. Rather blunt and without any social niceties. More subtle things I would say include being easily distracted by small things like the noise of a fan, or a shaft of light coming through a window, even mid conversation.

Also, needing to know in great detail plans before being able to go somewhere. So if you went to a restaurant with an autistic person, they'd need to know exactly when you were going and the route you were going to take, what the seating is like, being able to see the menu beforehand, probably looking up what the building looks like on google maps and the route... Not comfortable with spur-of-the-moment, or impulsive things.
I am not male... Definitely female however I am definitely not very subtle.
Its interesting you pick up on saying no use being vague.
In general life I wouldn't say that however looking through TSR it seemed appropriate or at least common place.
Last edited by glassalice; 1 month ago
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OddOnes
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(Original post by The-judge-16)
Actually that is where you are wrong in some respects, yes some aspies are incredible at maths, however some aren’t they excel in other areas such as music or arts. Savant syndrome is a medical condition in which someone displays exceptional skills amongst they’re overall disability, however every savants skill is different (many savants are autistic by the way). Search savant syndrome on google!
I remember a documentary about that. A kid couldn't talk but his drawings were outstanding.

With the maths things I was at a postgraduate welcome event and the maths PhD students called themselves "The Asperger Table" :laugh:
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Sammylou40
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Parent of an aspie.
The biggest clue on first impressions and the giveaway are speech patterns and body language
After that everyone is wonderfully unique and amazing so it’s different for individuals
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glassalice
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(Original post by Tsrloulou)
Lack of casual eye contact during conversations I feel like is quite a big giveaway. Neurotypicals tend to maintain eye contact, but wonder their eyes briefly every 5-10 or so seconds. I think eye contact when talking to someone is considered ‘normal’ but non - stop staring isn’t and neither is constantly darting eyes between the persons eyes and their surroundings.
Okay with out sounding weird, what would be the normal timing inbetween stopping and restarting eye contact. I kinda guess that when stopping I should look to the side a little but not wonder.
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by glassalice)
Okay with out sounding weird, what would be the normal timing inbetween stopping and restarting eye contact. I kinda guess that when stopping I should look to the side a little but not wonder.
I can’t speak for everyone but eye contact is a big problem for aspies full stop. There’s no right or wrong, just be comfortable
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rru
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ig it depends on the person but someone who speaks similarly to a child can be a big tip-off that they have aspergers (i don’t mean that in a condescending way, just that children can be very straightforward & opinionated in what they’re saying)

these days i take some lessons in the hub at my school (facility for students who have trouble in mainstream classes for various reasons), one specific girl with aspergers there talks quite loud and brash & tends to go on long, detailed rants about things- even when others want to get on with work or something

this is a common trait i noticed amongst some, but i only know a small number of people with aspergers so i’m sure it varies greatly from person to person. either way, i hope this helped a bit ^^
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Sabertooth
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Talking incessantly to people about things that the non-aspie has absolutely no interest in.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Sammylou40)
I can’t speak for everyone but eye contact is a big problem for aspies full stop. There’s no right or wrong, just be comfortable
Exactly - they're each individuals, just like anyone else.
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
Talking incessantly to people about things that the non-aspie has absolutely no interest in.
And having very little interest in what others are saying
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by Sammylou40)
And having very little interest in what others are saying
Yep and knowing a lot about a very narrow area(s).
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