Which school dress codes did you disagree with?

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Itsmepoppy
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#21
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#21
Girls school can I point out, dumb rule of not being allowed to wear shorts above the knee in the summer? Yet some girls wore pretty short skirts, way more provocative than normal practical summer shorts. Also not allowed to show shoulders.

Any school that has the stupid mentality of don't wear this and distract the boys, you naughty girls. And at my school, there were only girls anyway, except male teachers, so basically calling them perverts
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gjd800
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#22
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#22
pretty much all of it
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skittish
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#23
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#23
(Original post by _gcx)
Not a fan of uniform in general. It's just pointless traditionalism that can be done without. Not to say there shouldn't be some guidelines to make sure people don't take the piss.
I personally like uniform because I really overthink what I'm wearing and just don't feel comfortable in things I've chosen, so if I don't have a choice I don't get distracted worrying that I look bad, if that makes sense? At my school I've found that people get teased for their appearance more on home clothes days more than regular days, but that could just be my perception.
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Napp
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#24
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#24
Polished shoes -.-
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b4thed4ysend
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#25
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#25
Trainers should be allowed. I understand not allowing shoes with crazy coloured logos on them because I understand that can create divides between people from different financial backgrounds but there's no denying that a pair of trainers are far more comfortable, durable and practical than the cheap pointed school shoes that students are forced to wear!
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Flooffyk
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#26
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#26
Probably top button on dress shirt had to be up, I don’t have a stick thin neck... so having a teacher force do my top button was the worst . Even when they can see it’s right around my throat!
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evalaurenee
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#27
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#27
(Original post by skittish)
(we have a uniform from years 7-11 and have to wear suits in years 12 and 13)

At my college we have to choose between the skirt or the trouser uniform. However, if someone assigned male at birth wants to wear a skirt, or someone assigned female at birth wants to wear trousers, their parents have to write a letter to the college and then have a meeting with the heads of safeguarding in order to confirm the decision. This applies to everyone, including pupils in year 13 (many of whom are legally adults). My partner is non-binary (AMAB) and closeted due to homophobic parents; whilst they did not want to wear a skirt to school, they did want to grow their hair out to shoulder length- something which is only permitted if a pupil chooses to wear the skirt uniform. Despite explaining their situation to multiple teachers, they were banned from growing their hair out. Luckily they're at university now and have grown their hair to the desired length, but still. I understand that the school wants to ensure that pupils feel supported if they're transitioning, but the rules mean that cisgender pupils (mainly AFAB) do not feel comfortable wearing the "other" uniform for fear of being seen as trans, which has consequently meant that the policy has reinforced transphobia and drawn more attention to trans pupils. Whilst I'm lucky to have been supported by my parents (I'm FTM), the meeting with the safeguarding officers was honestly humiliating, as I was asked explicit and personal details, essentially having to "prove" my identity to people I barely knew. At the end of the day, the only difference is two leg-cloth-noodles vs one leg-cloth-noodle: why does it matter?

So yeah, that sucks.
That honestly sounds like the sh*ttest possible way they could think of to implement that policy whilst still giving them an excuse to say they did something; solidarity.

When I joined secondary the whole uniform was strictly defined ‘girls’/‘boys’ (PE still is unfortunately) but girls could wear trousers (in fact we got in the national news for proposing to ban skirts, before I joined) and in any case they didn’t really care for the segregation. In Year 10 I was in our student senate thing so pushed to get rid and thankfully our headteacher was receptive so now it just lists acceptable items rather than separate sets of uniform, eg ‘skirts if worn must be knee length’ etc. Much better for everyone
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skittish
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#28
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#28
(Original post by evalaurenee)
That honestly sounds like the sh*ttest possible way they could think of to implement that policy whilst still giving them an excuse to say they did something; solidarity.

When I joined secondary the whole uniform was strictly defined ‘girls’/‘boys’ (PE still is unfortunately) but girls could wear trousers (in fact we got in the national news for proposing to ban skirts, before I joined) and in any case they didn’t really care for the segregation. In Year 10 I was in our student senate thing so pushed to get rid and thankfully our headteacher was receptive so now it just lists acceptable items rather than separate sets of uniform, eg ‘skirts if worn must be knee length’ etc. Much better for everyone
That makes much more sense. Yeah, it's really stupid because a lot of schools allow girls to wear trousers without making it into a big deal but my school wanted the publicity so marketed the change as a trans thing, which alienated a lot of cis people.
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