B1557 – Beaver Protection Bill 2020.

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Andrew97
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B1557 – Beaver Protection Bill 2020, TSR Government




An Act to give legal protection to beavers and their habitats in England and Wales.





BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: —

1. The beaver shall become a protected species in England and Wales within the meaning of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.
2. Schedule 5 of the Act shall be amended accordingly.

Title, Commencement and Extent
3. This Bill shall be known as the Beaver Protection Bill 2020.
4. This Bill shall apply to England and Wales.
5. This Bill shall become effective from Royal Assent.

Notes
The legislation can be found at: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/69

Beaver protection is law in Scotland, and since the re-introduction to parts of Devon, this Bill extends protection to England and Wales. Beavers were common in the UK until hunted into extinction in the 16th Century. The benefits of the species on the environment are detailed in the following link.

https://www.rspb.org.uk/our-work/our...ion-in-the-uk/
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Jammy Duel
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Benefits according to advocates*
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The Mogg
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Page not found

Says it all really.
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CoolCavy
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Absolutely :clap2: beavers have been proven to reduce flooding in areas they have been reintroduced
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Aph
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I would have assumed that this was already the case?
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CatusStarbright
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Which species of beaver are we talking about here? There are two in the world though I assume we are speaking of the Eurasian beaver.

I'd also like to ask why the government feels they need protected status given they are deemed of 'least concern' (the bottom category) from a conservation point of view.
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04MR17
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If CoolCavy supports this, it has my backing. I defer to her on all questions concerning non-humans.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Absolutely :clap2: beavers have been proven to reduce flooding in areas they have been reintroduced
Have the reduced flooding or just moved the flood? If the former by what mechanism, if the latter is it beneficial? In either case, how severe is the flooding prevented/moved? What are the costs of this flood defence? Are there alternative methods that generate the same outcome with a lower cost?
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Aph
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)
Which species of beaver are we talking about here? There are two in the world though I assume we are speaking of the Eurasian beaver.

I'd also like to ask why the government feels they need protected status given they are deemed of 'least concern' (the bottom category) from a conservation point of view.
One imagines because there are fewer than 20 in England and we want to to re-establish themselves...
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CatusStarbright
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(Original post by Aph)
One imagines because there are fewer than 20 in England and we want to to re-establish themselves...
Where on earth did you get that figure from? After doing some digging there is greater than that number from just two of the four current beaver projects in England.

https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/saving-species/beavers
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Aph
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)
Where on earth did you get that figure from? After doing some digging there is greater than that number from just two of the four current beaver projects in England.

https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/saving-species/beavers
It seems I forgot that they bread... anyway my point remains.
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CatusStarbright
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(Original post by Aph)
It seems I forgot that they bread... anyway my point remains.
No, I don't think they know how to bake (bad joke, sorry).
And mine remains - their population is growing healthily and they are not deemed to be at risk at all.
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Aph
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)
No, I don't think they know how to bake (bad joke, sorry).
And mine remains - their population is growing healthily and they are not deemed to be at risk at all.
You know what I mean! I forgot they had sex...
the point is that if someone decided to hunt them, assuming it is currently legal, the population isn't that stable.
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Alex 3
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)
No, I don't think they know how to bake (bad joke, sorry).
And mine remains - their population is growing healthily and they are not deemed to be at risk at all.
I would agree with this, the second part (not the bad joke...)

I would like to see some evidence from the Government as to why they believe this measure is necessary and why beavers are at threat to be given this status. Otherwise, I would not vote in favour of this.
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CatusStarbright
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(Original post by Aph)
You know what I mean! I forgot they had sex...
the point is that if someone decided to hunt them, assuming it is currently legal, the population isn't that stable.
Lovely(!)
I assume the current habitats are conservation areas, but I'm sure the government can clarify - or should be able to if they've done their research properly.
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Iñigo de Loyola
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Abstain - don't know enough about the topic to hold an opinion
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Aph
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Have the reduced flooding or just moved the flood? If the former by what mechanism, if the latter is it beneficial? In either case, how severe is the flooding prevented/moved? What are the costs of this flood defence? Are there alternative methods that generate the same outcome with a lower cost?
Former, beavers slow down water in the top of the drainage basin. This means that as streams and rivers merge they accumulate water more slowly and rainfall takes longer to travel through the basin. as a result, instead of all the rain that fell in a drainage basin coming together all at once 6-7 hours later, it slowly drains away over several days, meaning all the rain doesn't go to the same single place all at once.
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Rakas21
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Mr Speaker, i will support this bill however i do hope we are not going to see twenty individual bills protecting any animal.
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barnetlad
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I support this Bill and the arguments in favour have been put eloquently. The Scots have led the way on this and so extension to England and Wales should be supported.
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The Mogg
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This bill of course does not have my support, because I couldn't really care less to be honest.
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