SaintMoon
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Recently got an e-mail from one of the school I applied to through Schools Direct, alongside an interview and written task, I've been tasked to do a mini teach for 20 minutes to a group of Year 7s/8s.
With no real guideline onto what I can teach I was wondering what ideas were there I could try for English? I was maybe thinking about an analysis of a section of Macbeth but I want something that may be more involved with the students rather than just me doing my own thing.
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04MR17
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(Original post by SaintMoon)
Recently got an e-mail from one of the school I applied to through Schools Direct, alongside an interview and written task, I've been tasked to do a mini teach for 20 minutes to a group of Year 7s/8s.
With no real guideline onto what I can teach I was wondering what ideas were there I could try for English? I was maybe thinking about an analysis of a section of Macbeth but I want something that may be more involved with the students rather than just me doing my own thing.
Have you had any more thoughts on this?
No basic idea is impossible to be interactive and involve the students. You could try to do a group reading of the piece, then explore what's actually going on in the plot beneath the language?
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SaintMoon
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My plan was to maybe teach the students about pathetic fallacy by highlighting elements of the weather and environment of the first couple pages of Macbeth, specifically looking at the scenes with Witches and then the scene of the aftermath of the battle.I was hoping to explain what feelings and emotions the environment could provoke towards the students and the characters and to then proceed with a group activity of the students maybe having a discussion among themselves about the battle. I would then overall tie it up by explaining that what they learnt today was pathetic fallacy.the plan was to block it 5 minutes presentation 10 minutes student activity and lastly 5 minutes summary/evaluation and asking the students if they had any questions of their own.anyway thats a brief idea of what I had, I still have until wednesday to fully cement the idea and create a presentation/worksheet around this idea.
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Foreverneek
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Hi there.

Do you know anything about the cohort of students that you are teaching? E.g. ability? Whether they have encountered Shakespeare before?

My only concern would be that this is a lot to achieve in only 20 minutes, especially considering how Shakespeare can be quite intimidating if encountered for the first time. It's not something that you necessarily want to rush.

If you are keen to teach pathetic fallacy, could you not look at different isolated examples of pathetic fallacy across a range of texts (e.g. 'The Woman in Black' - you could use a clip from the film to make this more vivid, a short extract from 'Macbeth', a piece of art)? You could differentiate this by starting with an 'easier' text, such as a painting and then progress to more challenging texts. Think about your end goal - if you want them to enjoy / become familiar with Shakespeare, features of a play etc., then 'Macbeth' is a valid choice. If your objective is to teach pathetic fallacy, think about how you could achieve this without introducing potential barriers that may make it more difficult for students to learn what you want them to learn.
Last edited by Foreverneek; 3 weeks ago
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SaintMoon
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Year 7/8 is what the email statedI was only planning on going over really v small portion of Macbeth and just pathetic fallacy, moreso less of a a deep analytical explanation of the term but moreso a stepping point to further develop further understanding on the term. I wrote a lot about Shakespeare in my personal statement and it's something I'm passionate in so I feel like it'd be the best option for me to show off a little bit and also Macbeth is easily the best starting point for Shakespeare imo. The presentation I plan on writing would actually start off with a little starter exercise on what the students already know about Shakespeare and then building on that whittling it down to the specifics, I've already made a similar type presentation before for my university module so I could try replicating a similar method.
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Foreverneek
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(Original post by SaintMoon)
Year 7/8 is what the email statedI was only planning on going over really v small portion of Macbeth and just pathetic fallacy, moreso less of a a deep analytical explanation of the term but moreso a stepping point to further develop further understanding on the term. I wrote a lot about Shakespeare in my personal statement and it's something I'm passionate in so I feel like it'd be the best option for me to show off a little bit and also Macbeth is easily the best starting point for Shakespeare imo. The presentation I plan on writing would actually start off with a little starter exercise on what the students already know about Shakespeare and then building on that whittling it down to the specifics, I've already made a similar type presentation before for my university module so I could try replicating a similar method.
What are your objectives? It's all well and good liking Shakespeare, but if your objective is to teach pathetic fallacy, I would question why you have chosen Shakespeare as a starting point. If you love Shakespeare, I would also question why you haven't perhaps focussed on performance or language e.g. poetry vs. prose. I'd just say be hesitant about the vehicle that you are using to teach about a device - are you going to be able to ensure that 'Macbeth' doesn't alienate students? What about students who are EAL? SEND? More distracted students? What is your rationale for using Shakespeare rather than any other text? Does Shakespeare use pathetic fallacy best? Why? There's a lot of groundwork that needs to be covered in terms of contextualising a passage and decoding meaning, especially in a Shakespeare text, before engaging with it on a deeper level.

As long as you can rationalise your choices and explain how each part of your lesson develops students' progress towards a learning objective, that's the main thing.
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