jonathanjames
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi, was hoping for some constructive feedback on this essay and an estimation at a mark out of 30?Thanks.
The question was: "How and why does Sheila change throughout the play?"
Sheila Birlings's personality and behaviour evolve dramatically throughout the play as a direct result of the Inspector's presence and confrontations.
Sheila - at first, is presented as an extremely immature yet smart child, spoilt and petty, a reflection of the obnoxious entitlements of the upper class in Priestley's time - as he intended it to be. However, throughout the play, a more responsible, sensible young women portrayed, developing all the way to Act 3 where her character arc and development are extremely significant. In the first act, Sheila uses simple, childish language when addressing her family: "I'm sorry Daddy" she says, referring to her father as "daddy" and her mother as "Mummy". Priestley probably intended for her to come across as childish and immature, perhaps to reflect what the upper class were raising their children to become, deliberately portraying them in a negative light. In Act 3 however, sheila begins to become more assertive and direct, taking responsibility for her actions: "Probably between us we killed her", and Priestley reflects this through her speech. She refers to her "mummy" as her "mother" now, using a more formal, sharp tone: "Oh Mother", Priestley directly structuring the way Sheila speaks as dominant and assertive at the end, contrasting this to her playful submissive side in Act 1, describing her speech using the adjectives "gaily" and "possessively" in the stage directions. I believe this was an effort by Priestley to illustrate to the audience that the strong, independent characteristics of the younger generation still had the potential to be brought forth and honed, turning them into better, stronger people.
Sheila also develops greatly in her moral approaches to the situation as well as accepting her indirect role in the suicide of Eva Smith, presenting herself as a likeable and good person. This is in direct contrast to Act 1, where despite some moral rules being prevalent, she was far less accepting of her role and was not presented as particularly contrite. She justifies her role in removing Eva Smith form her post, remarking that she "looked as if she could take care of herself". This quotation truly portrays Sheila as a whining girl who did not take complete responsibility for her actions where deserved. However, this is contrasted greatly by her behaviours and attitudes displayed in Act 3. She evidently shows remorse and accepts her due responsibility in her role in Eva Smith's death. She remarks how she was the first in a line of people to abuse Eva Smith: " I started it." Priestley also places the word "bitterly" in the stage directions to emphasise her remorseful attitude. Priestley probably structured the character development in such a way so Sheila could truly shine out as a benevolent individual, adding to my previous point about her mature development, signifying that the younger generation still had hope to become good people.
Sheila, throughout the play, begins to emulate the Inspector greatly through her language and moral attitudes, becoming assertive ad dominant in expressing herself, a great contrast to the submissive, naive girl portrayed in Act 1. She contradicts and undermines her parents throughout Act 3, command and assertions given that almost reverses their roles. She curtly remarks to her father, on returning her ring to Gerald: "Don't interfere". A direct superlative in her speech, many more appearing in Act 3. This is highly similar to the Inspector, who always established a clear cut demand to prize out information from the others. He is described as "massively taking charge", the adjective "massively" connoting authority and dominance. Sheila is also described as "flaring up" in one of her lines, drawing comparisons between herself and the Inspector, once described through stage directions as speaking "severely....rather savagely." As well as this, the Inspector acts as a moral law-enforcer, doling out fair judgements and questions that expose many of the family. Sheila is similar, she asks Gerald many questions as the Inspector does; also revealing Eric's drinking problem to her mother, and does not spare the rod in making harsh judgements about others, and expressing just statements. She remarks how everything the Inspector said was true in her own narration of events being linked together, remarking how "I started it" before moving onto the others' actions and stating how her mother "gave her the final push that finished her", a speech very similar to the ones the Inspector made throughout. Priestley intended these actions to come across as strong and charismatic, another message of how the younger generation could be morphed into strong, powerful figures who were fair and just - very similar to the Inspector.
0
reply
Gundabad(good)
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by jonathanjames)
Hi, was hoping for some constructive feedback on this essay and an estimation at a mark out of 30?Thanks.
The question was: "How and why does Sheila change throughout the play?"
Sheila Birlings's personality and behaviour evolve dramatically throughout the play as a direct result of the Inspector's presence and confrontations.
Sheila - at first, is presented as an extremely immature yet smart child, spoilt and petty, a reflection of the obnoxious entitlements of the upper class in Priestley's time - as he intended it to be. However, throughout the play, a more responsible, sensible young women portrayed, developing all the way to Act 3 where her character arc and development are extremely significant. In the first act, Sheila uses simple, childish language when addressing her family: "I'm sorry Daddy" she says, referring to her father as "daddy" and her mother as "Mummy". Priestley probably intended for her to come across as childish and immature, perhaps to reflect what the upper class were raising their children to become, deliberately portraying them in a negative light. In Act 3 however, sheila begins to become more assertive and direct, taking responsibility for her actions: "Probably between us we killed her", and Priestley reflects this through her speech. She refers to her "mummy" as her "mother" now, using a more formal, sharp tone: "Oh Mother", Priestley directly structuring the way Sheila speaks as dominant and assertive at the end, contrasting this to her playful submissive side in Act 1, describing her speech using the adjectives "gaily" and "possessively" in the stage directions. I believe this was an effort by Priestley to illustrate to the audience that the strong, independent characteristics of the younger generation still had the potential to be brought forth and honed, turning them into better, stronger people.
Sheila also develops greatly in her moral approaches to the situation as well as accepting her indirect role in the suicide of Eva Smith, presenting herself as a likeable and good person. This is in direct contrast to Act 1, where despite some moral rules being prevalent, she was far less accepting of her role and was not presented as particularly contrite. She justifies her role in removing Eva Smith form her post, remarking that she "looked as if she could take care of herself". This quotation truly portrays Sheila as a whining girl who did not take complete responsibility for her actions where deserved. However, this is contrasted greatly by her behaviours and attitudes displayed in Act 3. She evidently shows remorse and accepts her due responsibility in her role in Eva Smith's death. She remarks how she was the first in a line of people to abuse Eva Smith: " I started it." Priestley also places the word "bitterly" in the stage directions to emphasise her remorseful attitude. Priestley probably structured the character development in such a way so Sheila could truly shine out as a benevolent individual, adding to my previous point about her mature development, signifying that the younger generation still had hope to become good people.
Sheila, throughout the play, begins to emulate the Inspector greatly through her language and moral attitudes, becoming assertive ad dominant in expressing herself, a great contrast to the submissive, naive girl portrayed in Act 1. She contradicts and undermines her parents throughout Act 3, command and assertions given that almost reverses their roles. She curtly remarks to her father, on returning her ring to Gerald: "Don't interfere". A direct superlative in her speech, many more appearing in Act 3. This is highly similar to the Inspector, who always established a clear cut demand to prize out information from the others. He is described as "massively taking charge", the adjective "massively" connoting authority and dominance. Sheila is also described as "flaring up" in one of her lines, drawing comparisons between herself and the Inspector, once described through stage directions as speaking "severely....rather savagely." As well as this, the Inspector acts as a moral law-enforcer, doling out fair judgements and questions that expose many of the family. Sheila is similar, she asks Gerald many questions as the Inspector does; also revealing Eric's drinking problem to her mother, and does not spare the rod in making harsh judgements about others, and expressing just statements. She remarks how everything the Inspector said was true in her own narration of events being linked together, remarking how "I started it" before moving onto the others' actions and stating how her mother "gave her the final push that finished her", a speech very similar to the ones the Inspector made throughout. Priestley intended these actions to come across as strong and charismatic, another message of how the younger generation could be morphed into strong, powerful figures who were fair and just - very similar to the Inspector.
Easy Grade 7. Probably Grade 8. Maybe even Grade 9. 24/30 marks in my opinion. A good structure with excellent analysis.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Would you give consent for uni's to contact your parent/trusted person in a mental health crisis?

Yes - my parent/carer (106)
34.42%
Yes - a trusted person (88)
28.57%
No (81)
26.3%
I'm not sure (33)
10.71%

Watched Threads

View All