Overwhelmed with school work

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Lllamaglama
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My health has been pretty bad this year so I’ve missed a lot of school. I am generally pretty good at every subject, however through constantly catching up and doing homework’s and revising for tests, I’ve been very overwhelmed with work, resulting in me procrastinating a lot. On Thursday I have a maths test and a biology project, which, for both, I haven’t started looking at. They aren’t really important but biology is one of my best subjects, and people have high expectations for my maths, so naturally I want to do well. It doesn’t help that I still constantly feel sick and find it difficult to work, so how should I try and achieve a high score for them in such a short time? Thank you!!!
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PetitePanda
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Hi I moved your thread to a more specific forum Maybe doing a maths paper everyday would be good start?
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bfm.mcdermott
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I'm in a similar position so I empathise. What year are you in?

Study tips will always depend on how you learn best, but in my experience, when I need to catch-up and revise quickly/cram, I don't bother writing notes (except for a few topics where I need to just memorise a process etc.)
For biology: Usually, I will read the textbook (starting with topics I find hardest in case I run out of time) and, if possible, ask my parents to test me. As I read, I tend to write down any little key facts that I need to memorise just before the test - but make sure it doesn't turn into just writing notes as this is very time-consuming and not that effective. Most people say exam questions are the best revision and theoretically I agree, but I don't find it that useful close up to a test.
If you're doing A-levels, quickly looking at the practical key terms - 'validity', 'accuracy', 'reproducibility', etc. can be useful.
For maths: Skim through notes/class slides/textbook and write any key points. Look over them and memorise them. Try and do a couple of questions on each topic if you have time. At the minimum, make sure you understand the basic concepts - if you have a topic you struggled with in class, spend a bit of extra time working through some examples.

I would probably focus on the biology, as there is more content to learn, whereas hopefully you can do more of the maths without having revised it, although this may be different for you. Just make sure you know any formulae etc. or you'll lose easy marks.

In terms of motivation to revise, one weird tip I've found is to make timelapses of me studying. This forces me to work for a set time or the timelapse will look bad. Also, I find moving to different locations can sometimes help me get remotivated (although of course there are limited places you can move to). Recently, I have been starting sessions by watching a quick YouTube video like 'day in the life...' by uni students studying what I will hopefully be studying next year. This helps me to focus on my work and feel more productive.

Depending on your symptoms, there may be different things you can do to make studying easier.
For example, one of my symptoms is chronic migraine with light sensitivity, so sometimes have lie down with blindfold on and can't read. I am lucky enough to have parents who are able to help me by reading my textbook to me.
Make yourself as comfortable as possible (be in bed if it helps pain, have heat packs/nausea bands/etc. if you need them).

Please try not to worry about other people's expectations. I completely understand what you mean, but they will understand if you've been unwell and missed school that your performance will be somewhat affected.

I assume you're seeing doctors already if you've been ill for a while, but if you are struggling to manage the symptoms, maybe go back to them and see if there is anything they can do to make it easier.

These are just things that have worked for me, and might not work for everyone.
I hope this helped. Good luck with your tests!
Last edited by bfm.mcdermott; 3 weeks ago
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Lllamaglama
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(Original post by bfm.mcdermott)
I'm in a similar position so I empathise. What year are you in?

Study tips will always depend on how you learn best, but in my experience, when I need to catch-up and revise quickly/cram, I don't bother writing notes (except for a few topics where I need to just memorise a process etc.)
For biology: Usually, I will read the textbook (starting with topics I find hardest in case I run out of time) and, if possible, ask my parents to test me. As I read, I tend to write down any little key facts that I need to memorise just before the test - but make sure it doesn't turn into just writing notes as this is very time-consuming and not that effective. Most people say exam questions are the best revision and theoretically I agree, but I don't find it that useful close up to a test.
If you're doing A-levels, quickly looking at the practical key terms - 'validity', 'accuracy', 'reproducibility', etc. can be useful.
For maths: Skim through notes/class slides/textbook and write any key points. Look over them and memorise them. Try and do a couple of questions on each topic if you have time. At the minimum, make sure you understand the basic concepts - if you have a topic you struggled with in class, spend a bit of extra time working through some examples.

I would probably focus on the biology, as there is more content to learn, whereas hopefully you can do more of the maths without having revised it, although this may be different for you. Just make sure you know any formulae etc. or you'll lose easy marks.

In terms of motivation to revise, one weird tip I've found is to make timelapses of me studying. This forces me to work for a set time or the timelapse will look bad. Also, I find moving to different locations can sometimes help me get remotivated (although of course there are limited places you can move to). Recently, I have been starting sessions by watching a quick YouTube video like 'day in the life...' by uni students studying what I will hopefully be studying next year. This helps me to focus on my work and feel more productive.

Depending on your symptoms, there may be different things you can do to make studying easier.
For example, I have chronic migraine with light sensitivity, so sometimes have lie down with blindfold on and can't read. I am lucky enough to have parents who are able to help me by reading my textbook to me.
Make yourself as comfortable as possible (be in bed if it helps pain, have heat packs/nausea bands/etc. if you need them).

Please try not to worry about other people's expectations. I completely understand what you mean, but they will understand if you've been unwell and missed school that your performance will be somewhat affected.

I assume you're seeing doctors already if you've been ill for a while, but if you are struggling to manage the symptoms, maybe go back to them and see if there is anything they can do to make it easier.

These are just things that have worked for me, and might not work for everyone.
I hope this helped. Good luck with your tests!
Thank you so much! Honestly this is probably the most helpful advice I have been given so thank you I am about to start working for my GCSE’s so the tests aren’t that important, but I still want to do well. I have been going to the doctors for the past 5 years and they can’t understand what’s wrong with me so I just have to suffer through. I hope your migraines don’t affect you too much and I hope you do the university course you want. Thanks again
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