Poetry Anthology-The Emigree theory

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EthanolC2_H5_OH
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So recently I've thought up a theory about the Emigree that the deeper I go into it, the more it makes sense to me. The Emigree talks about a city and a country the narrator 'left as a child'... Towards the end of world war 2, many Germans began fleeing east Germany and Berlin in a mass exodus to escape the USSR and communism. This is further headed by the fact her view of this city and country, despite the 'worst news' she receives of it cannot break her 'original view'. Could this 'worst news' be referencing the horrors committed by the Nazi regime. It would make a lot of sense if this was the case. She talks about how the country may be 'at war' and 'sick with tyrants' which could be referencing the fact that the Germans were on the retreat from the USSR from 1942 and at war with Britain and America on the Western front (World War 2, not the trenches from world war 1). Being sick with tyrants could very well be a reference to the Nazi regime as it was a tyrannical dictatorship with a despotic, evil man at the helm. Being sick with tyrants or being at war could also be a reference to the communist regime of east Germany and the cold war.
In the next stanza, the narrator describes how 'time rolls its tanks' which could be reference to the battle of Oder–Neisse which was believed to be the victory to 'break through the gates of Berlin'. In the battle the soviets used 20,000 tanks and in world war 2, tanks were used to alot more effect than they had been used in the first world war. 'Banned by the state' could refer to the fact that West Germany banned the Nazi party from ever forming and Denazisation that followed shortly after the war or the idea that East Berlin was well known for shutting down free speech and arresting political opponents using a secret police.

In the third Stanza, the narrator talks about how she cant go back as she has 'no passport.' And how the city takes her dancing through the 'city of walls'. This could be an obvious nod to the Berlin Wall and how there was extreme travel restrictions both to enter East Berlin and to leave East Berlin, the narrator is likely a West German though as most people who ran from Germany in the exodus were running from communism in the east. 'They accuse me of absence' and 'they circle me' all show the slow resentment to nazism that came from denazisation in Germany following the world war years.

This is a lot to read, but if you have any other theories or anything feel free to comment
Last edited by EthanolC2_H5_OH; 1 year ago
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fijitastic
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You must be getting a 9 in English.. and i'll also be stealing that genius theory
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EthanolC2_H5_OH
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(Original post by fijitastic)
You must be getting a 9 in English.. and i'll also be stealing that genius theory
Feel free , also i'm not getting a 9 i'm just really passionate about history so made some really abstract links for some reason
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