Blue_skies124
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‘Evidence of evil and suffering in the world,provides a greater challenge to the evidence of god than the logical problem of evil’

I’m struggling to answer this
I’ve mentioned how the logical problem of evil poses a greater challenge to Christians since it causes them to question the fundamental beliefs they have of god

The fact that you can justify the logical problem of evil but you can’t deny the evidence of evil in the world
I need two more points but I’m not entirely sure
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Joe312
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I wrote a model essay that's very similar to that question which you can find in the Philosophy tab on this website here: https://alevelphilosophyandreligion.com/
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Blue_skies124
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Thank you so much for the help
I’ll go read it
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philosophytutor
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(Original post by Blue_skies124)
‘Evidence of evil and suffering in the world,provides a greater challenge to the evidence of god than the logical problem of evil’

I’m struggling to answer this
I’ve mentioned how the logical problem of evil poses a greater challenge to Christians since it causes them to question the fundamental beliefs they have of god

The fact that you can justify the logical problem of evil but you can’t deny the evidence of evil in the world
I need two more points but I’m not entirely sure
The biggest problem A Level Philosophy students seem to encounter is the temptation to claim that one or another argument is stronger than it actually is.
In fact the problem of evil, like the problem of divine hiddenness, is not as problematic for theists as some atheists may believe: here is one of the most outstanding theologians of the 20th century and former pope Benedict:

"Remarkably enough, the claim that there can no longer be any God, the claim, that is, that God has completely disappeared, is the urgent conclusion drawn by onlookers at the terror, the people who view the horrors from the cushioned armchair of their own prosperity and attempt to pay their tribute to it and ward it off from themselves by saying, “If such things can happen, there is no God!” But among those who are themselves immersed in the terrible reality, the effect is not infrequently just the opposite: it is precisely then that they discover God."

The strength of the arguments from the problem of evil depends on the background assumptions, in particular the assumptions regarding the nature of God, which the usual properties of goodness and omnipotence do not fully explain - it is possible to be good and omnipotent is different ways.
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Joe312
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(Original post by philosophytutor)
The biggest problem A Level Philosophy students seem to encounter is the temptation to claim that one or another argument is stronger than it actually is.
In fact the problem of evil, like the problem of divine hiddenness, is not as problematic for theists as some atheists may believe: here is one of the most outstanding theologians of the 20th century and former pope Benedict:

"Remarkably enough, the claim that there can no longer be any God, the claim, that is, that God has completely disappeared, is the urgent conclusion drawn by onlookers at the terror, the people who view the horrors from the cushioned armchair of their own prosperity and attempt to pay their tribute to it and ward it off from themselves by saying, “If such things can happen, there is no God!” But among those who are themselves immersed in the terrible reality, the effect is not infrequently just the opposite: it is precisely then that they discover God."

The strength of the arguments from the problem of evil depends on the background assumptions, in particular the assumptions regarding the nature of God, which the usual properties of goodness and omnipotence do not fully explain - it is possible to be good and omnipotent is different ways.
Do you think that response from the Pope works? It strikes me as being oddly more concerned with the psychological states involved in persuading people of the problem of evil rather than whether the argument is logically valid. I suppose that might be what you'd care about as a Pope but it just doesn't really look like a response to me.
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philosophytutor
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(Original post by Joe312)
Do you think that response from the Pope works? It strikes me as being oddly more concerned with the psychological states involved in persuading people of the problem of evil rather than whether the argument is logically valid. I suppose that might be what you'd care about as a Pope but it just doesn't really look like a response to me.
The argument is not as strong as it may appear due to the hidden assumptions, take a look at "Suffering and Evil: The Logical Problem" on Youtube. The pope wasn't of course engaging in a purely philosophical argument simply because it is not a purely philosophical question.
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Joe312
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(Original post by philosophytutor)
The argument is not as strong as it may appear due to the hidden assumptions, take a look at "Suffering and Evil: The Logical Problem" on Youtube. The pope wasn't of course engaging in a purely philosophical argument simply because it is not a purely philosophical question.
I do agree really that the logical problem makes assumptions about what an omnibenevolant and omnipotent being would do.

However what do you think provides a good response to the evidential problem of evil as proposed by for example Hume?
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