xxvine
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Has anyone used any of these study guides and have an opinion on which ones are the best as I want to purchase one for Family and Employment law.

Many thanks.
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username3689312
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Concentrate and nutshells are very basic. What is the reason you need these?
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xxvine
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(Original post by james_law)
Concentrate and nutshells are very basic. What is the reason you need these?
What about law express?

I have textbooks for each module but I just want something to use as an aid which is more compressed - also this study guides tend to have examples of how to answer problem questions which I struggle with.

If they are useless then I won't waste my money.
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username3689312
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I’ve not used law express. In my experience nut shells are good, however they ceased producing them. It would therefore be best to get the concentrate books, again that is my opinion.
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xxvine
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(Original post by james_law)
I’ve not used law express. In my experience nut shells are good, however they ceased producing them. It would therefore be best to get the concentrate books, again that is my opinion.
Have you used concentrate?

I am obviously not going to be using them as my only book to revise from as the are obviously really cut down and should be used only for basic pointers.
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MidgetFever
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Never bothered with either of them, you're better off making notes from your textbooks and condensing them yourself. They don't cover issues in nearly enough detail at all.
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xxvine
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(Original post by MidgetFever)
Never bothered with either of them, you're better off making notes from your textbooks and condensing them yourself. They don't cover issues in nearly enough detail at all.
What about getting sample answers/how to answer problem questions step by step.
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MidgetFever
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(Original post by xxvine)
What about getting sample answers/how to answer problem questions step by step.
A lot of good textbooks will have sections in the back of each chapter that will help resolve these issues already. In the context of criminal law for example, Smith and Hogan's books have always had problem-based guidance in their books. I've also got several tort and administrative textbooks that do the same. No point forking out for a study guide, just find a good textbook at the library.
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xxvine
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(Original post by MidgetFever)
A lot of good textbooks will have sections in the back of each chapter that will help resolve these issues already. In the context of criminal law for example, Smith and Hogan's books have always had problem-based guidance in their books. I've also got several tort and administrative textbooks that do the same. No point forking out for a study guide, just find a good textbook at the library.
Thanks for that I will take your advice!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by xxvine)
What about law express?

I have textbooks for each module but I just want something to use as an aid which is more compressed - also this study guides tend to have examples of how to answer problem questions which I struggle with.

If they are useless then I won't waste my money.
I appreciate this is not undergraduate level, so textbooks are appropriate, but be aware that if you continue your studies in law, textbooks are a bit of a no. You don't learn the law by studying texbooks: you need to read cases, case reviews and good academic journals.

Just a heads up
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MidgetFever
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I appreciate this is not undergraduate level, so textbooks are appropriate, but be aware that if you continue your studies in law, textbooks are a bit of a no. You don't learn the law by studying texbooks: you need to read cases, case reviews and good academic journals.

Just a heads up
Whilst I agree, I think OP was looking specifically towards exam guidance.

Textbooks can provide useful insights into the different methods of approaching certain scenarios, some which I've found very useful. Information that you won't find in just reading cases. That being said, once you get past first year and get to grips with how to answer in an appropriate way, textbooks aren't needed as such.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by MidgetFever)
Whilst I agree, I think OP was looking specifically towards exam guidance.

Textbooks can provide useful insights into the different methods of approaching certain scenarios, some which I've found very useful. Information that you won't find in just reading cases. That being said, once you get past first year and get to grips with how to answer in an appropriate way, textbooks aren't needed as such.
I agree. Textbooks are a useful first step, and certainly useful when trying to work out how to approach a question, particularly if this hasn't been taught to you otherwise.
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xxvine
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I agree. Textbooks are a useful first step, and certainly useful when trying to work out how to approach a question, particularly if this hasn't been taught to you otherwise.
Yes I am after exam guidance
I have written exams coming up for Family and Employment law and I wanted more guidance on the best way to answer problem questions and thought the 'revision' guides may provide that.
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xxvine
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I appreciate this is not undergraduate level, so textbooks are appropriate, but be aware that if you continue your studies in law, textbooks are a bit of a no. You don't learn the law by studying texbooks: you need to read cases, case reviews and good academic journals.

Just a heads up
This is undergraduate level
I am in my second year of the LLB course.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by xxvine)
This is undergraduate level
I am in my second year of the LLB course.
OK. In that case you should most definitely not be using basic textbooks like Nutshells or the others!
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username3689312
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(Original post by Reality Check)
OK. In that case you should most definitely not be using basic textbooks like Nutshells or the others!
I don't see the problem with using them. I used nutshell and concentrate books to get a 1st overall in commercial and EU law.

Yes they are basic but they go over it really simply and enable you to understand and then develop your answer from there. I say yes use them but appreciate what they are. Its like E law resources, I used that and continue to do so if i need some basic info, would i cite it as authority, absolutely not.
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xxvine
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(Original post by Reality Check)
OK. In that case you should most definitely not be using basic textbooks like Nutshells or the others!
I think I haven't made myself clear or you don't understand me?

I don't want to purchase them to use them as my only aid and REVISE SPECIFICALLY from them. That would be silly as it is basically a revision guide that does not contain hardly any information, its just basically main points summerised.
I struggle with answering problem questions so I thought those guides would help with that.
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xxvine
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(Original post by james_law)
I don't see the problem with using them. I used nutshell and concentrate books to get a 1st overall in commercial and EU law.

Yes they are basic but they go over it really simply and enable you to understand and then develop your answer from there. I say yes use them but appreciate what they are. Its like E law resources, I used that and continue to do so if i need some basic info, would i cite it as authority, absolutely not.
Do you know if they contain info on exam answers/structure...

Like where did you get your information/learn how to answer problem questions well?
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