Japanese antiviral showing very promising results

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Fullofsurprises
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Japanese company Fujifilm Toyama Chemical has been getting promising results from its antiviral drug Favipiravir. People with Coronavirus have been showing negative after 4 days treatment and patients have had significant lung condition improvement.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...rus-says-china

The company's shares have surged and they could get approval by early May apparently. The drug is not effective for people with severe conditions unfortunately, but this is a very good development.

Fantastic the way all these health professionals, scientists, doctors and researchers are working so hard all over the world to come up with solutions. Yes, there is often a profit motive, but let's also salute these frontline workers and their marvellous skill, dedication and professionalism under pressure.
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Ascend
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Fantastic the way all these health professionals, scientists, doctors and researchers are working so hard all over the world to come up with solutions.
💪

Yes, there is often a profit motive,
Profit is a significant motive in the advancement of medicine, science and tech. Not to turn this thread into a capitalist/socialist catfight but yeah...
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Ascend
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COVID-19 Will Fuel the Next Wave of Innovation

Via https://humanprogress.org.
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Drewski
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There's also news from India that a particular cocktail of existing drugs has been quite effective.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Drewski)
There's also news from India that a particular cocktail of existing drugs has been quite effective.
Oh great, is there a link, I couldn't see that from a very quick Googling.
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Fullofsurprises
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Sounds like one of our top scientists who leads the fight against the virus from Imperial College may have Coronavirus himself.
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...s-illness.html

Professor Neil Ferguson, one of the world's leading experts in the field.
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Oh great, is there a link, I couldn't see that from a very quick Googling.
It was in the Instagram story for the 'happynewspaper' yesterday, but it's been over 24hrs now so it's dropped off the feed.
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ANM775
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Japanese company Fujifilm Toyama Chemical has been getting promising results from its antiviral drug Favipiravir. People with Coronavirus have been showing negative after 4 days treatment and patients have had significant lung condition improvement.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...rus-says-china

The company's shares have surged and they could get approval by early May apparently. The drug is not effective for people with severe conditions unfortunately, but this is a very good development.

Fantastic the way all these health professionals, scientists, doctors and researchers are working so hard all over the world to come up with solutions. Yes, there is often a profit motive, but let's also salute these frontline workers and their marvellous skill, dedication and professionalism under pressure.

(Original post by Drewski)
There's also news from India that a particular cocktail of existing drugs has been quite effective.


So 3rd world countries are already making cures so why is there all this talk of "18 months minimum" in places like the UK/US?

If this is because the drug needs to get FDA aproval or some sh*t then something needs to change. 18 months is too long.
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Drewski
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(Original post by ANM775)
So 3rd world countries are already making cures so why is there all this talk of "18 months minimum" in places like the UK/US?

If this is because the drug needs to get FDA aproval or some sh*t then something needs to change. 18 months is too long.
Not cures. Treatments that help. But with treatments comes treatment-resistant strains.

What other places are working on is a vaccine which takes much longer to sign off.

They are two distinct clinical terms.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Oh great, is there a link, I couldn't see that from a very quick Googling.
I believe the Indian stuff are various HIV things. There is also a US drug undergoing five human trials that was being developed for Ebola, the early news is an immediate impact because it stops the virus replicating in the same way Ebola does.

A lot of them won't help after the first week because by time your lungs and other organs are suffering and causing secondary effects.

Much like the Ebola outbreak a few years ago, outbreaks of stuff like this represent great potential benefit to all those pharma companies even if sold cheaply per unit to governments (60 million people needing them is still a massive compound profit) and so all those failed drugs from prior years suddenly have potential value if earlier work has shown they may have an impact.
(Original post by ANM775)
So 3rd world countries are already making cures so why is there all this talk of "18 months minimum" in places like the UK/US?

If this is because the drug needs to get FDA aproval or some sh*t then something needs to change. 18 months is too long.
As above these things are drugs which have been developed for previous diseases and being put on the shelf because they either failed or the competition developed something better. They are either general anti-virals that just happen to work on this one or drugs designed to stop the replication.

As above the stuff that may take 18 months is a Covid-19 specific vaccine in the same manner of TB for example because even if we can make one before years end, we have to produce it in mass volume and distribute. Your also starting from scratch whereas with the virals now, they have already passed various testing when they were being trialed for other things.
Last edited by Rakas21; 1 week ago
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Occitanie
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(Original post by ANM775)
So 3rd world countries are already making cures so why is there all this talk of "18 months minimum" in places like the UK/US?

If this is because the drug needs to get FDA aproval or some sh*t then something needs to change. 18 months is too long.
Japan, a 3rd world country?
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