Unemployment after graduating...?

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I'm The Real MVP
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I graduated from uni back in July. I did decently, I got a 2:1 in a law degree, and went to a decent university. I am struggling so badly to find any type of work. I've applied to so many jobs, grad schemes, internships, and I've had absolutely no luck. Is it normal to not have found anything yet? How do I get past this, because it's really getting me down and I have pretty much been stuck at home, not doing anything day in day out for the past 7 months.
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Brutal Bee
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What university did you go to? If you don't mind me asking, are you not looking for a career in law?
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MonsoonFlower
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(Original post by I'm The Real MVP)
I graduated from uni back in July. I did decently, I got a 2:1 in a law degree, and went to a decent university. I am struggling so badly to find any type of work. I've applied to so many jobs, grad schemes, internships, and I've had absolutely no luck. Is it normal to not have found anything yet? How do I get past this, because it's really getting me down and I have pretty much been stuck at home, not doing anything day in day out for the past 7 months.
You need to somehow gain practical work experience to make yourself stand out, what is it that you would like to do for a career?
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National Careers Service
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(Original post by I'm The Real MVP)
I graduated from uni back in July. I did decently, I got a 2:1 in a law degree, and went to a decent university. I am struggling so badly to find any type of work. I've applied to so many jobs, grad schemes, internships, and I've had absolutely no luck. Is it normal to not have found anything yet? How do I get past this, because it's really getting me down and I have pretty much been stuck at home, not doing anything day in day out for the past 7 months.
Hi there,

Hoping to offer some support.

Leaving uni and going into employment isn't always a seamless transition and many graduates do find this difficult particularly if they have no practical and related work experience to go alongside their degree qualification.

It would be great to hear a little more about any work experience placements you did or volunteering work that you took part in alongside your degree.

Look forward to hearing back from you - Sophie.
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fallen_acorns
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go teach english abroad for a year. They will take you easily if your british and have a degree.. its easy work, you'll earn 30k a year or more if your good at negotiating/good at your job.. and it will give you a bit of time to re-asses and think about plan for the future. Also you'll get to live in another country and have a bit of fun.

I'm not saying its your new career, but i've known plenty of people who have done it for a year to get away, get some indipendance and a bit of cash, and then they have planned and gone on to work towards what they actually wanted to do after.
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Goldenparadise
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(Original post by National Careers Service)
Hi there,

Hoping to offer some support.

Leaving uni and going into employment isn't always a seamless transition and many graduates do find this difficult particularly if they have no practical and related work experience to go alongside their degree qualification.

It would be great to hear a little more about any work experience placements you did or volunteering work that you took part in alongside your degree.

Look forward to hearing back from you - Sophie.
This what individuals need to research before going to university. Sometimes when you do have a bit of practical experience it isn't enough (and it's something that I too have have experience. My advice is try to get a part time job in meantime, sitting down at home doing nothing will drive you instance. Does you university provide any form of support to recent graduate looking for employment? Used their resources to the best of your advantage.
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mackers_ire
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You could also try some volunteering. It will give you some experience to put on your CV for a time commitment of as low as 5 hours a week. Do that for 2-3 months and it may help
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I'm The Real MVP
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(Original post by Brutal Bee)
What university did you go to? If you don't mind me asking, are you not looking for a career in law?
I studied at SOAS. I'm not really considering a career in law but at this point I'm not really ruling anything out.

(Original post by MonsoonFlower)
You need to somehow gain practical work experience to make yourself stand out, what is it that you would like to do for a career?
The problem is I've always been unsure what I've wanted to do career-wise, however I've been applying to banks (areas like risk, project management, etc), consulting companies, marketing positions, trainee lawyer positions, FMCGs... I've been trying to apply for internships in order to build up my work experience, which I know I don't have much of, but even those haven't been successful.

(Original post by National Careers Service)
Hi there,

Hoping to offer some support.

Leaving uni and going into employment isn't always a seamless transition and many graduates do find this difficult particularly if they have no practical and related work experience to go alongside their degree qualification.

It would be great to hear a little more about any work experience placements you did or volunteering work that you took part in alongside your degree.

Look forward to hearing back from you - Sophie.
Hi, I didn't do very much work experience during uni. I did a marketing internship during the summer of my second year. Apart from that my work experience came before uni, mostly shadowing in banks, law firms, some volunteering at a charity shop.

(Original post by fallen_acorns)
go teach english abroad for a year. They will take you easily if your british and have a degree.. its easy work, you'll earn 30k a year or more if your good at negotiating/good at your job.. and it will give you a bit of time to re-asses and think about plan for the future. Also you'll get to live in another country and have a bit of fun.

I'm not saying its your new career, but i've known plenty of people who have done it for a year to get away, get some indipendance and a bit of cash, and then they have planned and gone on to work towards what they actually wanted to do after.
What's the best way to go about doing something like that? I would be interested, do you need a teaching qualification? I have some language skills but nothing fluent.

(Original post by Goldenparadise)
This what individuals need to research before going to university. Sometimes when you do have a bit of practical experience it isn't enough (and it's something that I too have have experience. My advice is try to get a part time job in meantime, sitting down at home doing nothing will drive you instance. Does you university provide any form of support to recent graduate looking for employment? Used their resources to the best of your advantage.
You're right, it's totally driving me insane. My university has honestly been pretty rubbish over the years when it's come to career advice whilst I was still a student, so I haven't really used them as a resource.

(Original post by mackers_ire)
You could also try some volunteering. It will give you some experience to put on your CV for a time commitment of as low as 5 hours a week. Do that for 2-3 months and it may help
What volunteering is good, CV wise? I have some previous long-term volunteering, but I'm wondering if there's anything more heavyweight that I could/should be doing rather than working at a charity shop?
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fallen_acorns
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(Original post by I'm The Real MVP)
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A lot depends on which country you want to go to. I work with a lot of teachers in China, and most of them don't have teaching qualifications, just a degree, and either a TESOL (easy to get) or if not, they do that on arrival with the school/training center they are going to work with. As you can imagine, generally the more developed the country, the more strict and higher the requirments are.. if your talking China, vietnam, thailand etc.. is much more relaxed than japan/singapore/hong kong. That's only Asia, as that's the area I know a lot about - other parts of the world I'm less sure about.

There is a huge shortage of native English teachers across asia, so schools are very willing to take a chance on British people who may not have experience, because its better than nothing.

In my experience the best way to go about it is to first pick the country you want to go to.. then look on the job boards for that country for ESL teaching jobs, and you'll find loads. Set up profiles on there, message a few of them, and you'll get something in no time.
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DuckDodgers
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
A lot depends on which country you want to go to. I work with a lot of teachers in China, and most of them don't have teaching qualifications, just a degree, and either a TESOL (easy to get) or if not, they do that on arrival with the school/training center they are going to work with. As you can imagine, generally the more developed the country, the more strict and higher the requirments are.. if your talking China, vietnam, thailand etc.. is much more relaxed than japan/singapore/hong kong. That's only Asia, as that's the area I know a lot about - other parts of the world I'm less sure about.

There is a huge shortage of native English teachers across asia, so schools are very willing to take a chance on British people who may not have experience, because its better than nothing.

In my experience the best way to go about it is to first pick the country you want to go to.. then look on the job boards for that country for ESL teaching jobs, and you'll find loads. Set up profiles on there, message a few of them, and you'll get something in no time.
Unless something has changed, S.Korea is a good balance. You're effectively employed by a private school (Haegwon) and they're quite open to graduates. It's easier if you have a TEFL or TESOL of course.

The CELTA is an option, although it costs about 1.5k to take. I'd definitely do that myself if I were to teach abroad as it gives you a lot more choice - mainly the ability to teach adults rather than just children.
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sharongrapes
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Are you getting to the interview/assessment centre stages? I don't think work experience/internships are that important when applying to grad schemes such as the Big 4 tbh - I know plenty of people including myself who got onto a grad scheme this year without ever interning but that's just my experience.
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Cherx
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
A lot depends on which country you want to go to. I work with a lot of teachers in China, and most of them don't have teaching qualifications, just a degree, and either a TESOL (easy to get) or if not, they do that on arrival with the school/training center they are going to work with. As you can imagine, generally the more developed the country, the more strict and higher the requirments are.. if your talking China, vietnam, thailand etc.. is much more relaxed than japan/singapore/hong kong. That's only Asia, as that's the area I know a lot about - other parts of the world I'm less sure about.

There is a huge shortage of native English teachers across asia, so schools are very willing to take a chance on British people who may not have experience, because its better than nothing.

In my experience the best way to go about it is to first pick the country you want to go to.. then look on the job boards for that country for ESL teaching jobs, and you'll find loads. Set up profiles on there, message a few of them, and you'll get something in no time.
How about countries like Thailand?



Do you think it would get lonely going alone?
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I'm The Real MVP
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(Original post by fallen_acorns)
A lot depends on which country you want to go to. I work with a lot of teachers in China, and most of them don't have teaching qualifications, just a degree, and either a TESOL (easy to get) or if not, they do that on arrival with the school/training center they are going to work with. As you can imagine, generally the more developed the country, the more strict and higher the requirments are.. if your talking China, vietnam, thailand etc.. is much more relaxed than japan/singapore/hong kong. That's only Asia, as that's the area I know a lot about - other parts of the world I'm less sure about.

There is a huge shortage of native English teachers across asia, so schools are very willing to take a chance on British people who may not have experience, because its better than nothing.

In my experience the best way to go about it is to first pick the country you want to go to.. then look on the job boards for that country for ESL teaching jobs, and you'll find loads. Set up profiles on there, message a few of them, and you'll get something in no time.
This is really helpful. I think I would be looking more at Europe if anything, especially because I'm already based in Switzerland/UK. But I'll definitely take a further look into TESOL. Do you know if it's an expensive qualification?
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I'm The Real MVP
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(Original post by sharongrapes)
Are you getting to the interview/assessment centre stages? I don't think work experience/internships are that important when applying to grad schemes such as the Big 4 tbh - I know plenty of people including myself who got onto a grad scheme this year without ever interning but that's just my experience.
I've very rarely gotten invited to the assessment centre stages. Only two times. One was with the Big 4 which I know I bungled up, the other was with a bank and I felt I did well but got waitlisted. The other three of the Big 4, I didn't get past the early stages. Generally I've hardly gotten to video interview stage, let alone being invited to meet in person.
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fallen_acorns
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(Original post by I'm The Real MVP)
This is really helpful. I think I would be looking more at Europe if anything, especially because I'm already based in Switzerland/UK. But I'll definitely take a further look into TESOL. Do you know if it's an expensive qualification?
The online courses aren't too expensive. Then there are mixed courses where you do most of it online but a bit in class, and finally there are full year-long masters level courses. The level you need really depends on what you want to do with it after. In my experiance in Asia, online is fine to get a job, but obviously others would put you at an advantage. I've heard from teachers that there is a big shortage of English teachers in Eastern Europe and that they are more flexible with taking on new/inexperienced teachers. Things in western europe will be more competative and demanding qualification/experience wise, but I have a few friends teaching in Spain/France, and they are having a great time.
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username738914
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I feel you OP, it is quite tough if you don't have the most perfect run at things during that final year Sept to Dec recruiting period or if you converted an internship from your penultimate year.

For reference, I've done all the things that most people would deem useful in building a strong employability profile whilst at uni: first year insight scheme, good grades, internship after first year, internship after second year, leadership positions, volunteer work, part-time work throughout uni, etc. And with that, I've had a solid number of interviews at top tier companies for top roles but even if you get those interviews, you might just get unlucky with the person you interview with or in my case for a lot of positions, ambiguity around your performance on take-home assignments. I'm nearing the end of uni, feel like I've done everything I could and still don't have anything secured yet (although I'm still interviewing) so I get the frustration you're feeling.

Granted I've been pretty picky in the jobs I'm applying for but I don't feel like I need to settle or give up yet. Also I was unlucky since my internship employer in second year didn't have headcount to take on graduates throwing me back into the search for a job.

I think the advice here is to just keep hunkering down and applying. Take an active approach to your applications by reaching out to people with jobs you're interested in on Linkedin to ask about their journey and how you could possibly get there someday. Reach out to uni friends that have been a bit more successful in finding roles to see if they could connect you to anyone.

Also: continue applying to relevant roles. If you're applying to roles that allow you to show your abilities through your own independent work (think software engineering, design, data related roles, finance roles etc) then it's probably a good idea to work on some projects that are related to those roles to show you have the skillset that employers are looking for.

I would consider back-up plans like applying for a masters program and teaching english abroad. Especially alongside the upcoming graduate recruitment cycle that will be coming around this August/September. If you're struggling with interviews, I'd work on practicing your technique with friends and family. Try to have go to examples for typical competency questions and be thoroughly prepared for any technical interview questions.

Good luck and just know you're not alone. One of my mates graduated last year and only just managed to land a grad job at Sky a few weeks ago.
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I'm The Real MVP
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(Original post by Princepieman)
I feel you OP, it is quite tough if you don't have the most perfect run at things during that final year Sept to Dec recruiting period or if you converted an internship from your penultimate year.

For reference, I've done all the things that most people would deem useful in building a strong employability profile whilst at uni: first year insight scheme, good grades, internship after first year, internship after second year, leadership positions, volunteer work, part-time work throughout uni, etc. And with that, I've had a solid number of interviews at top tier companies for top roles but even if you get those interviews, you might just get unlucky with the person you interview with or in my case for a lot of positions, ambiguity around your performance on take-home assignments. I'm nearing the end of uni, feel like I've done everything I could and still don't have anything secured yet (although I'm still interviewing) so I get the frustration you're feeling.

Granted I've been pretty picky in the jobs I'm applying for but I don't feel like I need to settle or give up yet. Also I was unlucky since my internship employer in second year didn't have headcount to take on graduates throwing me back into the search for a job.

I think the advice here is to just keep hunkering down and applying. Take an active approach to your applications by reaching out to people with jobs you're interested in on Linkedin to ask about their journey and how you could possibly get there someday. Reach out to uni friends that have been a bit more successful in finding roles to see if they could connect you to anyone.

Also: continue applying to relevant roles. If you're applying to roles that allow you to show your abilities through your own independent work (think software engineering, design, data related roles, finance roles etc) then it's probably a good idea to work on some projects that are related to those roles to show you have the skillset that employers are looking for.

I would consider back-up plans like applying for a masters program and teaching english abroad. Especially alongside the upcoming graduate recruitment cycle that will be coming around this August/September. If you're struggling with interviews, I'd work on practicing your technique with friends and family. Try to have go to examples for typical competency questions and be thoroughly prepared for any technical interview questions.

Good luck and just know you're not alone. One of my mates graduated last year and only just managed to land a grad job at Sky a few weeks ago.
Thank you so much! I feel like I'm the only one struggling like this so it's nice to know I'm not alone. It's hard to keep motivated sometimes but I'm just going to keep on pushing out those applications, in the meantime I'll definitely consider teaching English as someone else mentioned in the thread. I've been looking at masters programs over the past few weeks as well so keeping that open as an option is helpful.

Wish you the best of luck, and thanks again!
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ColonialNomad
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I recruit for education providers in China who have a track record of treating their foreign teachers fairly. Once the borders are open, if you need to escape the UK for a bit, drop me a line and lets see how I can help. I'm on Reddit, FB and YT as well.
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