Gender affirming surgeries treated as "non essential"; as hospitals prepare for COVID

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ساره
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#61
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Coronavirus can be life’s threatening so drs prioritise the patients that have it.


This post legit reminds of this Italian guy that lied to the drs about not having coronavirus just so he could get his nose job done. He risked infecting the drs.
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AnonymousNoMore
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#62
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(Original post by Joel 96)
I looked at about 10 of the studies before giving up. I couldn't get access to some of them, but most were either ambiguous or had no comment in regards to the suicide rate post-surgery. I appreciate that you're citing, but can you cite a specific study that at least shows a decrease in the suicidal rate post-surgery?

And sure. First off, the June 2016 “Proposed Decision Memo for Gender Dysphoria and Gender Reassignment Surgery” concluded that,

"Based on a thorough review of the clinical evidence available at this time, there is not enough evidence to determine whether gender reassignment surgery improves health outcomes for Medicare beneficiaries with gender dysphoria. There were conflicting (inconsistent) study results – of the best designed studies, some reported benefits while others reported harms.".

But the actual study I'm referring to is the most largest and popular study that was conducted in Sweden regarding the after-effects of sexual reassignement surgery. In fact, it's pretty depressing. Most sex reassignment studies wrap up after a few months/years, but this one showed that results didn't become apparent until after 10 years. The results were,

"The overall mortality for sex-reassigned persons was higher during follow-up (aHR 2.8; 95% CI 1.8–4.3) than for controls of the same birth sex, particularly death from suicide (aHR 19.1; 95% CI 5.8–62.9). Sex-reassigned persons also had an increased risk for suicide attempts (aHR 4.9; 95% CI 2.9–8.5) and psychiatric inpatient care (aHR 2.8; 95% CI 2.0–3.9). Comparisons with controls matched on reassigned sex yielded similar results. Female-to-males, but not male-to-females, had a higher risk for criminal convictions than their respective birth sex controls."

Concluding that,

"Persons with transsexualism, after sex reassignment, have considerably higher risks for mortality, suicidal behaviour, and psychiatric morbidity than the general population. Our findings suggest that sex reassignment, although alleviating gender dysphoria, may not suffice as treatment for transsexualism, and should inspire improved psychiatric and somatic care after sex reassignment for this patient group."
In summary, other psychiatric care should be offered post surgery as well. And it also says that it decrease rate of suicide, surely that paints a positive view of gender reaffirming surgery?
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mpaprika
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All non emergent surgeries are being cancelled, since coronavirus is the main priority and people will still get aneurysms and directing aortas
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Joel 96
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(Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
Of course you're citing Dhejne. I'd recommend looking at what the lead author has to say on these interpretations of their study: https://www.reddit.com/r/science/com...m_source=share

She's quite clear that the study was never intended to determine the efficacy of transition as a treatment and that any attempts to view it through that lens is a distortion of the data. As for suicidality in general, it's not just about surgery, it's about acceptance, and those that have a supportive environment reduce all types of harm (as the series of reviews I linked also show)
I'm aware of the Reddit thread. She simply argues against misinterpretations like "sex reassignment surgery causes suicide", etc. I'm not saying that. I'm saying that the results in the Sweden study show that the suicide rate stays the same post-surgery, which is true. I understand that you have a whole variety of factors, like social stigma, but if sex reassignment surgery really was the Godsend for all sufferers of gender dysphoria, then there would have to be some kind of drop in the suicide rate. Simply saying "it's about acceptance" isn't good enough.

Again, do you have a study that shows a drop in the suicide rate after sex reassignment surgery?
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Joel 96
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(Original post by AnonymousNoMore)
And it also says that it decrease rate of suicide, surely that paints a positive view of gender reaffirming surgery?
Where?
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AnonymousNoMore
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#66
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(Original post by Joel 96)
Where?
In the main body you quoted
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Joel 96
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#67
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(Original post by AnonymousNoMore)
In the main body you quoted
Can you quote?
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AnonymousNoMore
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#68
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(Original post by Joel 96)
Can you quote?
Probably but I'm not going to.
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by AnonymousNoMore)
Probably but I'm not going to.
Helpful

Anyway. It’s not the point of the thread. Can we move on now please?
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Joel 96
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(Original post by AnonymousNoMore)
Probably but I'm not going to.
Lmao

(Original post by Sammylou40)
Can we move on now please?
Yeah I'm done here.
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LiberOfLondon
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(Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
I mean, that's no-ones actual argument though? "Character X is Y" is a common thing amongst any group that are terminally underrepresented in media and generally only represented as a joke
I wouldn't argue that the transgender community is terminally underrepresented given that there are quite a few YA novels with transgender protagonists, Sex Education (on Netflix) has a transgender character and Jenner is very much a celebrity.
look at every 90s and 2000s sitcom, they always had an episode with a trans character and those characters were invariably played as jokes where their transness was the beginning and end of their characterisation.
This isn't the 90s and 2000s - just because you weren't represented well in the past doesn't mean you get to make characters trans, gay or whatever. Besides, isn't that misgendering?
Given that dearth of representation I can hardly blame, for instance, trans guys projecting onto Spiderman.
Spiderman was (if memory serves) an office worker who was bit by a radioactive spider. Absolutely nowhere does ”he's trans” come into it.
As for remarks like "cis people are scum", while they don't exactly help win people over to supporting trans rights, I think you've got to look where the power is in that dynamic and whether "cis people are scum" holds any power or does any harm to cis people, and it's not on the same level as similar remarks directed at trans people instead
But transgender activists do hold power (cf the Maya Forstater case).
Either way, the ”prejudice plus power” argument (which you seem to be using) is:
1) not accepted by the majority of people
2) means you admit that ”cis people are scum” is a prejudiced statement
3) only applicable to institutional discrimination (like the Jim Crow laws) as opposed to interpersonal discrimination (like ”No blacks, no Irish, no dogs” signs) and so cannot be used to justify or excuse cisphobia.
I am willing to admit that there is no such thing as institutional cisphobia, but interpersonal cisphobia is very much a thing as can be shown here.
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ThatOldGuy
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(Original post by AnonymousNoMore)
In summary, other psychiatric care should be offered post surgery as well. And it also says that it decrease rate of suicide, surely that paints a positive view of gender reaffirming surgery?
Here is the study that was done:

https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi....2019.19010080

The study was done by Richard Branstrom. From the Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

What interests me about the study are his 'Adjusted odds' and his rather spectacular CI. (That's Confidence Interval for those who aren't data people).

Is this reproduceable? Why does he funnel his results through (His words):

both social epidemiological, psychological, and socioecological models to understand the influence of stigma and discrimination on physical and mental health disparities based on sexual orientation.

I will leave people to look at the study itself. I have questions, but admit to being a data guy rather than a clinical psychologist. If someone were to look at this, I would check out his methodology and questions.
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