Rafia_Tasnim
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Explain the role of negative feedback in homeostasis in mammals
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ZainabR12340
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(Original post by Rafia_Tasnim)
Explain the role of negative feedback in homeostasis in mammals
Negative Feedback is literally the action that ensures that a change helps the body stay at its ideal level (if you get what i mean). For example, mammals (humans mainly) have to control their body temperature (thermoregulation). The hypothalamus in the brain detects that the body's temperature is too low or high and the body will go through changes so that the body temperature goes back to normal. If the body is too low, the body goes through vasoconstriction where the blood vessels nearer to the skin become smaller to keep as much heat in the body and the muscles continuously contract causing shivering helping the body warm up. The negative feedback of this would be when the hypothalamus detects, after the changes made before when the body was too cold, that the body is now too hot and now the body goes through vasodilation so the blood vessels nearer to the vasodilation (become bigger and enlarge so that it is closer to the skin) and gives off some heat through the skin and the body sweats to give off more heat. Negative feedback can go either way (so the opposite of what i said before where the body initially detects that the body's temperature is too high to begin with and the negative feedback is when the body is now too low). This isn't the only thing that happens in the body as a negative feedback response there is also osmoregulation (controlling water levels), blood glucose regulation (controlling blood glucose levels). You can always research about others on BBC bitesize.
Sorry for the VERYY long response...
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lyer_in_hellfyre
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(Original post by ZainabR12340)
Negative Feedback is literally the action that ensures that a change helps the body stay at its ideal level (if you get what i mean). For example, mammals (humans mainly) have to control their body temperature (thermoregulation). The hypothalamus in the brain detects that the body's temperature is too low or high and the body will go through changes so that the body temperature goes back to normal. If the body is too low, the body goes through vasoconstriction where the blood vessels nearer to the skin become smaller to keep as much heat in the body and the muscles continuously contract causing shivering helping the body warm up. The negative feedback of this would be when the hypothalamus detects, after the changes made before when the body was too cold, that the body is now too hot and now the body goes through vasodilation so the blood vessels nearer to the vasodilation (become bigger and enlarge so that it is closer to the skin) and gives off some heat through the skin and the body sweats to give off more heat. Negative feedback can go either way (so the opposite of what i said before where the body initially detects that the body's temperature is too high to begin with and the negative feedback is when the body is now too low). This isn't the only thing that happens in the body as a negative feedback response there is also osmoregulation (controlling water levels), blood glucose regulation (controlling blood glucose levels). You can always research about others on BBC bitesize.
Sorry for the VERYY long response...
:awesome: :yy: nicely detailed for thermoregulation and osmoregulation
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ZainabR12340
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(Original post by lyer_in_hellfyre)
:awesome: :yy: nicely detailed for thermoregulation and osmoregulation
Thanks
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