Why has the SNP been a lot more successful than the BNP?

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FemaleinDress
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Both have national party in their full names but one does well and one doesn't

Why is that?
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AnonymousNoMore
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Because of what they represent, the snp is supposed to represent the average Scottish person. The BNP represents the highly right side of the political spectrum.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by FemaleinDress)
Both have national party in their full names but one does well and one doesn't

Why is that?
One is a bunch of far-right tossers. The other is a party which has the best interests of their population at heart and don't want dragging down the same shîtty path as England and Wales.
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StriderHort
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The word 'national' in the name is about the only thing they have in common.
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AnonymousNoMore
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(Original post by Reality Check)
One is a bunch of far-right tossers. The other is a party which has the best interests of their population at heart and don't want dragging down the same shîtty path as England and Wales.
Sounding quite bias there mate.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by AnonymousNoMore)
Sounding quite bias there mate.
:flute:
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londonmyst
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The BNP is pretty much the thug fascists of the NF re-branded with: a little bit of polish by means of lies/word games, a few dozen graduates, financial backers who have some employment history and lots of shenanigans involving money/bank accounts.

While the SNP are a serious political party.
One that do not tolerate any : race hate criminality, fascism, their membership loudly bragging about shoving excrement through other people's letterboxes as a matter of habit or public internecine brawls that involve illegal weapons.
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gjd800
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Civic nationalism vs ethnonationalism

Very simple
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L i b
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Keep in mind that, in terms of its existence, its current success is a blip. For many years, the SNP were a tiny, minor and publicly ridiculed organisation - generally thought of as being the political home of no-one other than a few swivel-eyed poets, the odd eccentric aristocrat and tartan-clad fantasists.

The SNP are, of course, quite different in what they believe and espouse from the BNP. But that isn't really the reason behind their success. They spent decades plugging away at it, taking advantage of opportunities and reaching out to communities. Ultimately, in the 1970s, the had some limited cut-through and became a challenge to a Labour hegemony that had not long stolen the Tories' position as the main party in Scotland.

The SNP were lucky with their opponents. From the late 80s onwards - perhaps earlier - the Scottish Tories were in an almost permanent state of wound-licking. Scottish Labour became a bizarre organisation, mired in corruption, absolutely tone-deaf to local politics, inflicting some truly awful MPs on communities who - quite often - never bother to lift a finger campaigning.

The SNP gained a foothold in anti-Labour areas, picking up "tartan Tory" anti-socialist votes. Once more established, they set themselves on a path of presenting themselves as a left-wing party in areas where it would do them good. They then set about the work of demolishing the Labour Party in Scotland, whose only response to them seemed to be vitriol and endless policy concessions. Labour's devolution strategy from the 70s tried to ride the horse of nationalism to combat the Tories, without realising that the SNP could always win that fight.

Even as late as 2011, the SNP's hold was thinner than we sometimes remember. That Holyrood election, Labour started with a lead in the polls (in 2007, the SNP had beat them by just one seat and governed in a Unionist-dominated Scottish Parliament). They ended up with a majority, as Labour's weakness and general awfulness shone through.

In short, it was a long journey - and one that required a lot of change, and shedding virtually any consistent principle beyond their core aim.

(Original post by londonmyst)
The BNP is pretty much the thug fascists of the NF re-branded with: a little bit of polish by means of lies/word games, a few dozen graduates, financial backers who have some employment history and lots of shenanigans involving money/bank accounts.

While the SNP are a serious political party.
One that do not tolerate any : race hate criminality, fascism, their membership loudly bragging about shoving excrement through other people's letterboxes as a matter of habit or public internecine brawls that involve illegal weapons.

For much of its life, the SNP was not seen as - or acted like - a serious political party. They were tarred, even until Alex Salmond's time, with religious sectarianism. The associations with fascism and Germany are there too, given the support in the Scottish nationalist movement for the Nazis during the war.

It was only after purges and counter-purges and acting firmly against their own instincts that the stage could be set for appearing serious. Any party with suitable determination can achieve that - they just have to start pushing the arguments in their direction. The BNP was (or is - does it still exist?), consistently, its own worst enemy in these areas.
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Smack
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The SNP cover the mainstream centre-left position, and have over the past decade demonstrated themselves to be more competent in governance than the farce that is Labour. Although it's important to note that this is a recent phenomena - only really this decade, and more so the later half of it.
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Lewiscccccccccc
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(Original post by Reality Check)
One is a bunch of far-right tossers. The other is a party which has the best interests of their population at heart and don't want dragging down the same shîtty path as England and Wales.
Oh really, you think England and Wales are down a ****ty path compared to Scotland, even though Scotland has some of the worst unemployment in the UK, most homeless deaths, and many more things which make it far worse than England
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L i b
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(Original post by Smack)
The SNP cover the mainstream centre-left position, and have over the past decade demonstrated themselves to be more competent in governance than the farce that is Labour. Although it's important to note that this is a recent phenomena - only really this decade, and more so the later half of it.
In terms of competence, I'm not sure they're objectively any more competent than the eight years of Lib-Lab Coalition administration that preceded them. Especially if you take Henry McLeish's short reign out of the picture.

They've got more powers and a lot more money to play with since the various Scotland Acts and the real-terms increases in the block grant since back then.
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Napp
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Ones a quasi neo-fascist entity ones a nationalist one... they're not even remotely similar bar 1 word in their title.
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Retired_Messiah
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I'd assume it's the starkly different politicians and policy points, myself.
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LiberOfLondon
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The Scot Nats are a civic nationalist party (nationalism based around shared values and cultural practices, as in France) whereas the BNP are a ethno nationalist party (nationalism based around being of the same race). Both are variants of nationalism (the belief that your country is the best, and that there are things all citizens of your country should have in common) but that's about it. There's also globalism (the belief that the nation-state is a bad idea and should be replaced with organisations like the EU and UN) which is supported by the Liberal Democrats, for instance.

I'm personally a civic nationalist as I believe that everyone in Britain should:
• Consider themselves British first and foremost, and be proud of that
• Speak English fluently
• Integrate into British culture and hold British values
• Be respectful of traditional practices
• Support a meritocratic form of government
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