NeroliTenzing
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#1
I'm a mature student, after several years working and travelling decided to finally give teaching a go.
Firstly, the academic content we've been taught has been nearly irrelevant, everyone on the course agrees on this.
But the main issue is I failed the first placement.
I never felt comfortable with the teacher, and a bit out of place at the school, but put this down to my own fears and got on with it.
The initial days there, I was really just floating support, I would pritt stick in learning objectives. When it was time for me to teach, I seriously struggled with lesson planning.
No one has taught me how to do it. I assumed the uni, then I assumed the school, then I assumed online...but nothing really. I mentioned this on my first week of full placement, and the teacher said I'd be put down as struggling, so I put up, shut up.
2nd week in, I was exhausted and contacted my tutor to say I couldn't finish an assignment as I was overwhelmed thinking of lessons. They immediately told the school (without my knowledge) so I felt like it blew up without me having a chance to get my bearings. This obviously will have irritated her, as the HT said I should have had access to school resources and said she knew by CBT could be sharp with people.
I still struggled, I was working til 12-1am each night, getting to school for 7. I genuinely thought I was losing the plot, as every piece of advice I took on, the next day I was told something else. I never had correct behaviour policy modelled either.
I had to keep a diary of the advice I was getting, and realised I was being told different things on different days.
I was CfC at the end of the first part, and fair enough, I wasn't coping. When I got back to uni, the stories I heard of other students, the help they got, what the got away with, I realised mine was veeeery strict.
I emailed my tutor again on Xmas break, as I was so stressed I actually had a seizure for the first time in a year, and asked for anxiety meds at the thought of seeing her.
Against my judgement, this was discussed at the school.
I was still working til 1am every night, but as I was taking on more timetable, I saw this as an improvement. But it was still the same contradictory modelling and advice. It blew up on the last day, where I felt I had followed advice, used the correct policy, but she told me to leave the school. I mentioned to HT I had this diary I needed to discuss and she kicked off, saying I was twisting people's words and that's why no-one's liked you....
Every job I've ever had, no one would describe me like this.
Sooooo, after uni basically said they would have to side with the school, which is infuriating, they're giving me a second chance at a school 2 hours away.
I am paranoid as hell about trying again. My friends have seen me teach some lessons since and said I was fine. My new mentor has seen me teach and said it was a great lesson (having a meltdown inside my head of all the things I thought had gone wrong).
Sorry for the diatribe, but has anyone had the same thing? I'm terrified to move to a new town, when emotionally I've had the stuffing knocked out of me. But from what friends and this new teacher has said it seems I might be OK.
Before I get trolled, I know taking criticism is part of the job, I hope my description has shown it was more power trippy than that.
If anything just helps to have it blurted out.
0
reply
Muserock
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
Sorry to hear that you failed your first placement. It very much depends on your fit with the school and how the school fits with you. Having had a bad placement recently with an unsupportive teacher, I know how difficult the PGCE can be.

With lesson planning, is there anyone you can talk to at the uni? We had a lesson on lesson planning and whilst, it isn't easy, it might help give you some guidance.

Try to put your experience behind you and learn what you can from it. A new school will bring new opportunities as well as challenges and just because you felt overwhelmed in this placement, doesn't mean you will in your new placement. Are you going into your placement soon? With the COVID-19, it's all rather uncertain at my university.
0
reply
NeroliTenzing
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#3
(Original post by Muserock)
Sorry to hear that you failed your first placement. It very much depends on your fit with the school and how the school fits with you. Having had a bad placement recently with an unsupportive teacher, I know how difficult the PGCE can be.

With lesson planning, is there anyone you can talk to at the uni? We had a lesson on lesson planning and whilst, it isn't easy, it might help give you some guidance.

Try to put your experience behind you and learn what you can from it. A new school will bring new opportunities as well as challenges and just because you felt overwhelmed in this placement, doesn't mean you will in your new placement. Are you going into your placement soon? With the COVID-19, it's all rather uncertain at my university.
Thanks, it was due to start soon, I'd had a few weeks getting to know the class, but like you say with COVID now, who knows when the schools will be open again. I had spoken to them about planning, they couldn't really get past generics. But from 'group' lessons we had to plan with a few other students I realised how high strung my expectations were. Looking at it from my mentor's view they were rubbish, but they got good feedback when running through them, so I'm trying to reorientate. It's just hard telling myself to ignore this teacher who really didn't know how to support a new student, only how to berate.
0
reply
Muserock
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
I had the same thing. it sounds like you're doing really well. My advice would be to try to think about if there was anything that the teacher had a point with and reflect on those. I know it is hard but if there are particular areas that you know you struggle with, maybe taking some time to look at those areas beforehand.
1
reply
computed
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 week ago
#5
(Original post by linneahunter)
I'm a mature student, after several years working and travelling decided to finally give teaching a go.
Firstly, the academic content we've been taught has been nearly irrelevant, everyone on the course agrees on this.
But the main issue is I failed the first placement.
I never felt comfortable with the teacher, and a bit out of place at the school, but put this down to my own fears and got on with it.
The initial days there, I was really just floating support, I would pritt stick in learning objectives. When it was time for me to teach, I seriously struggled with lesson planning.
No one has taught me how to do it. I assumed the uni, then I assumed the school, then I assumed online...but nothing really. I mentioned this on my first week of full placement, and the teacher said I'd be put down as struggling, so I put up, shut up.
2nd week in, I was exhausted and contacted my tutor to say I couldn't finish an assignment as I was overwhelmed thinking of lessons. They immediately told the school (without my knowledge) so I felt like it blew up without me having a chance to get my bearings. This obviously will have irritated her, as the HT said I should have had access to school resources and said she knew by CBT could be sharp with people.
I still struggled, I was working til 12-1am each night, getting to school for 7. I genuinely thought I was losing the plot, as every piece of advice I took on, the next day I was told something else. I never had correct behaviour policy modelled either.
I had to keep a diary of the advice I was getting, and realised I was being told different things on different days.
I was CfC at the end of the first part, and fair enough, I wasn't coping. When I got back to uni, the stories I heard of other students, the help they got, what the got away with, I realised mine was veeeery strict.
I emailed my tutor again on Xmas break, as I was so stressed I actually had a seizure for the first time in a year, and asked for anxiety meds at the thought of seeing her.
Against my judgement, this was discussed at the school.
I was still working til 1am every night, but as I was taking on more timetable, I saw this as an improvement. But it was still the same contradictory modelling and advice. It blew up on the last day, where I felt I had followed advice, used the correct policy, but she told me to leave the school. I mentioned to HT I had this diary I needed to discuss and she kicked off, saying I was twisting people's words and that's why no-one's liked you....
Every job I've ever had, no one would describe me like this.
Sooooo, after uni basically said they would have to side with the school, which is infuriating, they're giving me a second chance at a school 2 hours away.
I am paranoid as hell about trying again. My friends have seen me teach some lessons since and said I was fine. My new mentor has seen me teach and said it was a great lesson (having a meltdown inside my head of all the things I thought had gone wrong).
Sorry for the diatribe, but has anyone had the same thing? I'm terrified to move to a new town, when emotionally I've had the stuffing knocked out of me. But from what friends and this new teacher has said it seems I might be OK.
Before I get trolled, I know taking criticism is part of the job, I hope my description has shown it was more power trippy than that.
If anything just helps to have it blurted out.
I am incredibly sorry to hear what you have been going through. Before you continue to read my reply, take 20 seconds to just BREATHE!
Firstly - Congratulations on venturing out of your usual comfort zone and giving teaching a try. It really is rewarding and, in the right school, you will do wonders! I always tell people/students who tell me that I could earning more money in industry that I enjoy teaching to 'give back to education' and because I get great satisfaction from watching people excel.

I am assuming that you are in a primary school? Although my advice is exactly the same for secondary as well so don't worry. You did not mention the subject either so I can't give you any subject advice. I also can't understand why you are speaking with the headteacher as this is not usually the person you should go to first for help/support. There should be dedicated person in the school (sometimes known as a 'PCM') to help you. I know firsthand how difficult it is to reach the end of the PGCE and it comes with a lot of patience, determination, and help from the right people. People have different expectations of everyone, especially if they have been at a school/setting for a while - they tend to be the 'I am more experienced than you, so there!' type. No one really pays a lot of attention to the 'newbie', but you just need to hang in there. They seem to forget that they were once in your position! However, remember not everyone is like this!

Additionally, well done on going down the university route. You may not realise it, but this route offers you a lot of support that you wouldn't really get too much of in a route such as school's direct etc. It sounds to me like your university has all the right intentions - trying to speak to your school to resolve things but looks like they are constantly keeping you out of the loop on what they will do next, which is not very professional if you ask me.

My first port of call in a situation like this would be to contact my union for example NEU or NASUWT. They can provide you with immediate support while you are in the school, but as a general thing they can advise you on what your rights are and what you can do next. You do not need to tell anyone that you are contacting the union - in fact keep that as confidential as possible. Remember that you need to have signed up with them for at least 6 weeks in order for them to help you, but if you sign up now I am sure there is no harm in contacting them for help in case they are feeling generous!

The next thing I would say is arrange a meeting with your tutor to discuss the issues you have faced and how this has affected you. If you prefer, and I would recommend this, write it in a short email so that it is documented and so that you have time to compose yourself. After the email, you can leave it to your tutor to arrange any meetings or ways forward. Make it clear that you want to keep this confidential therefore if they go and tell the school all of this, you have something to back yourself up ("I make it clear that I wanted this to be kept confidential...").

It is incredibly rude and wrong for the school to say those things to you. As 'newbies', we often are reluctant to 'talk back' for fear of making things worse. It's because of this that people in schools think they can say what they like. I am not going to lie - when I read that your university have said they need to 'side with the school', I became shocked as this is the same path I went down. This is totally not right for them to do and caused me a lot of grief when my uni did this. Do you pay your fees to the university, only for the outcome to be left to the school the university placed you in, in the first place?

Additionally, I can't make out who exactly has failed your first placement. If it is the school, they usually do not have a say in whether or not you passed that placement or not. It is typically the university who recommends you for QTS, NOT the school (assuming you are doing a PGCE). As long as you are meeting the teacher's standards and making 'expected progress', there is no reason for you to fail - especially if this is someones first placement.

Couple more options for you to consider:
1. Defer your course and return with a view to redo your 'failed' placement. Say that you want to take some time out and re-evaluate things before going back in this.
2. Withdraw completely from your course and university and re-apply at another university - I did this and it made a world of difference. You are allowed to do this and providers/universities (in my experience) have been very understanding. A few of them didn't even want to know my reason for leaving my previous course. However, if you do this, you will need to pay what you owe your current university and also a new loan for the new university. If you are considering this, withdraw BEFORE you fail the whole COURSE.
3. Put up with the 2 hour away school - but consider other logistics as well (work/life balance etc and the fact your uni have not supported you fully thus far).

No one is born a teacher and as an NQT, I am still learning how to do things on a DAILY BASIS. So okay, (for example) year 9 didn't like the 'copying from the whiteboard thing' today, I will not do that with the other year 9's that I see tomorrow. Do you see what I mean?

Don't give up. You are much better than that. You came into teaching because it obviously meant something to you. Do you really want to quit and keep thinking about "What if.."?

Finally, you have made the right decision to reach out for help on here, but do be careful with what you share and with who as the world of teaching is very small.

I hope I have helped you in some way!

Best wishes and best of luck. If you have any other questions, feel free to reply here or send a PM.
Regards.
Last edited by computed; 1 week ago
0
reply
NeroliTenzing
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#6
Hi,

Thanks for responses everyone!
I'm trying to get my username changed, but I kept searching forums for similar situations and nothing quite fitted with mine and needed a vent.
My headteacher was my university link, as well as my tutor. So it's meant to go my teacher > headteacher > tutor. Really think it went downhill from that first email I sent to my tutor and then being halfway through the school day, being called up on it. Not the best way to process it correctly. I didn't realise how cut throat a school would be, I'm getting such a different vibe from the new teacher.
I did give my own feedback on lesson observations...but in the sense I could see the contradictions of what I was being shown and told to do versus their feedback. I assume they're more used to 21 year olds out of university who wouldn't call that out and that was irritating them more.
I did speak to the Students Union, they said I could complain down the guidance route, in that there is a list three pages long of what is expected of a student, but very little as to what to expect at a placement school. I'm still in shock of how others describe their placements. Essentially the complaint would mainly be about the placement school and that's not much the university would discuss with me on their side.
I have put my point across about how I felt it had been dealt with, I appreciate them 'giving me a second chance' but there was nothing more than a shrug of shoulders and 'let's move forward'. I really wanted some recognition at the very least that I had some valid points.
I knew I was still failing some of the standards with my previous observation a week before, but it was a full 'not meeting' decided, on my 2nd last day by the teacher and the head. I was distraught and ordered off the premises with no concern as to where I was going or what I would do. I had to get home in floods of tears.
I never complained about the long hours even though my family were alarmed at what I was doing, and I just really hope it pays off at the next school. I've already told my new adviser that I'm paranoid about what I can ask for help about. Genuinely feel like, intentionally or not I've been gaslighted.
I know I could defer, but with COVID think I'm getting that breathing space anyway as much as it's god awful. And I know to quit before I might fail again. I was so excited to start last September, now I'm trying to remember why.
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 week ago
#7
I'm sorry to hear that you've been through this- it does sound like a really difficult situation.

From your original post, it sounds like your uni discussed details of your seizure and anxiety with the school without your consent? This is very concerning to me, as in no way should they be sharing your medical details with anyone without your consent.

However, other than medical information, you do have to assume anything you share with your uni tutor will be shared with school. Your uni tutor is not really there as someone to offload to, they are someone who makes sure you are getting the right support in school, so if you tell them there is a problem, they are expected to act on it. If you just want to offload, then uni wellbeing services can be a better choice.

It does sound like you were very unsupported with lesson planning both before placement and in school- this must have made things difficult to deal with. No-one should be up until midnight planning, this is totally unsustainable, and there are ways to do it more quickly (partly by stealing everything you can).

It does sound like the school haven't treated you brilliantly, especially on the last day. However, I would just say as a word of advice- whilst on the PGCE or NQT, never call anyone out on their advice or how they are teaching. A lot of the time you will get contradictory advice and feedback, or people who give advice but don't follow it themselves. It's not great, but calling people out on it just gets their back up and makes life difficult for you. Just sit there, smile and nod, and then do the best you can next lesson!

The PGCE is a really tough process, and a lot of people really struggle at one placement but do fine at another. So much comes down to what your mentor and in-school support are like, unfortunately.

Good Luck going forwards, and I hope you're able to pass whenever you're able to resume placement.

ETA: At my uni, it was against policy to be failed on a standard if you weren't already aware you were failing it and given a chance to improve. Do check policies carefully and you may be able to appeal some/all of the judgement on your previous term.
Last edited by SarcAndSpark; 1 week ago
0
reply
NeroliTenzing
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
I'm sorry to hear that you've been through this- it does sound like a really difficult situation.

From your original post, it sounds like your uni discussed details of your seizure and anxiety with the school without your consent? This is very concerning to me, as in no way should they be sharing your medical details with anyone without your consent.

However, other than medical information, you do have to assume anything you share with your uni tutor will be shared with school. Your uni tutor is not really there as someone to offload to, they are someone who makes sure you are getting the right support in school, so if you tell them there is a problem, they are expected to act on it. If you just want to offload, then uni wellbeing services can be a better choice.

It does sound like you were very unsupported with lesson planning both before placement and in school- this must have made things difficult to deal with. No-one should be up until midnight planning, this is totally unsustainable, and there are ways to do it more quickly (partly by stealing everything you can).

It does sound like the school haven't treated you brilliantly, especially on the last day. However, I would just say as a word of advice- whilst on the PGCE or NQT, never call anyone out on their advice or how they are teaching. A lot of the time you will get contradictory advice and feedback, or people who give advice but don't follow it themselves. It's not great, but calling people out on it just gets their back up and makes life difficult for you. Just sit there, smile and nod, and then do the best you can next lesson!

The PGCE is a really tough process, and a lot of people really struggle at one placement but do fine at another. So much comes down to what your mentor and in-school support are like, unfortunately.

Good Luck going forwards, and I hope you're able to pass whenever you're able to resume placement.

ETA: At my uni, it was against policy to be failed on a standard if you weren't already aware you were failing it and given a chance to improve. Do check policies carefully and you may be able to appeal some/all of the judgement on your previous term.
Thanks, I realise now not to call them out on it, although I still think that's ridiculous. I was genuinely confused as to which way to go with the advice and why I was being criticised for what I saw the teacher doing. The uni could have given me a heads up this is what to expect!
0
reply
NeroliTenzing
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#9
(Original post by computed)
I am incredibly sorry to hear what you have been going through. Before you continue to read my reply, take 20 seconds to just BREATHE!
Firstly - Congratulations on venturing out of your usual comfort zone and giving teaching a try. It really is rewarding and, in the right school, you will do wonders! I always tell people/students who tell me that I could earning more money in industry that I enjoy teaching to 'give back to education' and because I get great satisfaction from watching people excel.

I am assuming that you are in a primary school? Although my advice is exactly the same for secondary as well so don't worry. You did not mention the subject either so I can't give you any subject advice. I also can't understand why you are speaking with the headteacher as this is not usually the person you should go to first for help/support. There should be dedicated person in the school (sometimes known as a 'PCM') to help you. I know firsthand how difficult it is to reach the end of the PGCE and it comes with a lot of patience, determination, and help from the right people. People have different expectations of everyone, especially if they have been at a school/setting for a while - they tend to be the 'I am more experienced than you, so there!' type. No one really pays a lot of attention to the 'newbie', but you just need to hang in there. They seem to forget that they were once in your position! However, remember not everyone is like this!

Additionally, well done on going down the university route. You may not realise it, but this route offers you a lot of support that you wouldn't really get too much of in a route such as school's direct etc. It sounds to me like your university has all the right intentions - trying to speak to your school to resolve things but looks like they are constantly keeping you out of the loop on what they will do next, which is not very professional if you ask me.

My first port of call in a situation like this would be to contact my union for example NEU or NASUWT. They can provide you with immediate support while you are in the school, but as a general thing they can advise you on what your rights are and what you can do next. You do not need to tell anyone that you are contacting the union - in fact keep that as confidential as possible. Remember that you need to have signed up with them for at least 6 weeks in order for them to help you, but if you sign up now I am sure there is no harm in contacting them for help in case they are feeling generous!

The next thing I would say is arrange a meeting with your tutor to discuss the issues you have faced and how this has affected you. If you prefer, and I would recommend this, write it in a short email so that it is documented and so that you have time to compose yourself. After the email, you can leave it to your tutor to arrange any meetings or ways forward. Make it clear that you want to keep this confidential therefore if they go and tell the school all of this, you have something to back yourself up ("I make it clear that I wanted this to be kept confidential...").

It is incredibly rude and wrong for the school to say those things to you. As 'newbies', we often are reluctant to 'talk back' for fear of making things worse. It's because of this that people in schools think they can say what they like. I am not going to lie - when I read that your university have said they need to 'side with the school', I became shocked as this is the same path I went down. This is totally not right for them to do and caused me a lot of grief when my uni did this. Do you pay your fees to the university, only for the outcome to be left to the school the university placed you in, in the first place?

Additionally, I can't make out who exactly has failed your first placement. If it is the school, they usually do not have a say in whether or not you passed that placement or not. It is typically the university who recommends you for QTS, NOT the school (assuming you are doing a PGCE). As long as you are meeting the teacher's standards and making 'expected progress', there is no reason for you to fail - especially if this is someones first placement.

Couple more options for you to consider:
1. Defer your course and return with a view to redo your 'failed' placement. Say that you want to take some time out and re-evaluate things before going back in this.
2. Withdraw completely from your course and university and re-apply at another university - I did this and it made a world of difference. You are allowed to do this and providers/universities (in my experience) have been very understanding. A few of them didn't even want to know my reason for leaving my previous course. However, if you do this, you will need to pay what you owe your current university and also a new loan for the new university. If you are considering this, withdraw BEFORE you fail the whole COURSE.
3. Put up with the 2 hour away school - but consider other logistics as well (work/life balance etc and the fact your uni have not supported you fully thus far).

No one is born a teacher and as an NQT, I am still learning how to do things on a DAILY BASIS. So okay, (for example) year 9 didn't like the 'copying from the whiteboard thing' today, I will not do that with the other year 9's that I see tomorrow. Do you see what I mean?

Don't give up. You are much better than that. You came into teaching because it obviously meant something to you. Do you really want to quit and keep thinking about "What if.."?

Finally, you have made the right decision to reach out for help on here, but do be careful with what you share and with who as the world of teaching is very small.

I hope I have helped you in some way!

Best wishes and best of luck. If you have any other questions, feel free to reply here or send a PM.
Regards.
Hey, any chance you can delete your post as it contains my initial username, I've changed it so it's not me showing! Thanks again for your help though.
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 week ago
#10
(Original post by NeroliTenzing)
Thanks, I realise now not to call them out on it, although I still think that's ridiculous. I was genuinely confused as to which way to go with the advice and why I was being criticised for what I saw the teacher doing. The uni could have given me a heads up this is what to expect!
Yeah it is really tough- the PGCE is such a weird situation to be in.

The reality is that no-one can be the perfect teacher all the time, and good mentors get this and explain this. Some mentors know the theory and expect you to be capable of it, whilst making excuses for themselves.

I think it's wrong that the quality of your mentor is so make or break on your PGCE, but it very often is, and unless they are absolutely terrible, the uni will often prioritise their relationship with schools over an individual student's wellbeing- but they obviously don't want to tell you that at the start of the course!

I'm not saying any of this is right, by the way, I just think there are some real problems with the PGCE system.

All I can say is if you get through it, it does get better!
0
reply
Muserock
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 week ago
#11
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Yeah it is really tough- the PGCE is such a weird situation to be in.

The reality is that no-one can be the perfect teacher all the time, and good mentors get this and explain this. Some mentors know the theory and expect you to be capable of it, whilst making excuses for themselves.

I think it's wrong that the quality of your mentor is so make or break on your PGCE, but it very often is, and unless they are absolutely terrible, the uni will often prioritise their relationship with schools over an individual student's wellbeing- but they obviously don't want to tell you that at the start of the course!

I'm not saying any of this is right, by the way, I just think there are some real problems with the PGCE system.

All I can say is if you get through it, it does get better!
I agree. The PGCE system really does need a rethink to support students more, rather than placement experiences being pot luck.
0
reply
NeroliTenzing
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#12
Thank you both of you, thanks to everyone replying! Taking all my willpower to believe the next one will be better.
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 week ago
#13
(Original post by Muserock)
I agree. The PGCE system really does need a rethink to support students more, rather than placement experiences being pot luck.
I think it just needs more standardisation, and less relying on mentors who often have a full classload of their own to teach.

I do think that there should be tighter restrictions on who can be a mentor- a lot of people end up with someone who is NQT+2, and while some of these people are awesome, in general, I do think the less experienced the mentor, the more likely you are to have a poor experience (although this isn't always the case).
(Original post by NeroliTenzing)
Thank you both of you, thanks to everyone replying! Taking all my willpower to believe the next one will be better.
My PGCE was pretty crap throughout, if I am honest, but being an NQT is so much better!
1
reply
Muserock
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 week ago
#14
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
I think it just needs more standardisation, and less relying on mentors who often have a full classload of their own to teach.

I do think that there should be tighter restrictions on who can be a mentor- a lot of people end up with someone who is NQT+2, and while some of these people are awesome, in general, I do think the less experienced the mentor, the more likely you are to have a poor experience (although this isn't always the case).

My PGCE was pretty crap throughout, if I am honest, but being an NQT is so much better!
I agree there should be tighter restrictions on who can be a mentor. Not just in experience but also in whether they are full/part time (I don't think a part time teacher should be a mentor unless there are two that job share and they are equally use to having students) and I think the mentor should have a choice with it. Mine didn't seem to want to have a student and I think it was the school who had informed that class teacher that they were having one.

I'm glad to hear it is much better as an NQT.
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 week ago
#15
(Original post by Muserock)
I agree there should be tighter restrictions on who can be a mentor. Not just in experience but also in whether they are full/part time (I don't think a part time teacher should be a mentor unless there are two that job share and they are equally use to having students) and I think the mentor should have a choice with it. Mine didn't seem to want to have a student and I think it was the school who had informed that class teacher that they were having one.

I'm glad to hear it is much better as an NQT.
Yeah- I think it can happen that mentoring gets pushed onto people who don't always want it, or feel they can't say no, which is never ideal for the student.

I agree that part-time mentors often aren't ideal as well- job share mentors where both take some responsibility for you sound good.

Also, to be fair to mentors, a lot of them don't get any extra time to take on this responsibility- they ought to get some extra PPA as standard!
0
reply
lozzielizzie
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#16
Report 6 days ago
#16
University tend to side with schools over the trainee as they want to keep the school on board with them. I went school direct and choose the school I trained at and got lucky with my b placement school who were great as well. Mentors should allow trainees the chance to develop their own style of teaching and not teach their way. Though everything been thrown up in the air now due covid-19. I was doing fine on my training, so hoping I will be awarded QTS. Gutted not to go back to my home school for last part of training. Hoping things get back to normal soon
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Regarding Ofqual's most recent update, do you think you will be given a fair grade this summer?

Yes (95)
26.99%
No (257)
73.01%

Watched Threads

View All