Warm weather may help kill coronavirus

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Ferrograd
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https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...-kill-covid-19

Studies have shown that other coronaviruses are seasonal, generally limited to the winter. They thrive the least in warm, humid climates and the most in cool, dry climates.

Yeah, our weather right now in the UK isn't great for it. Cold, frosty, dry, we need something warmer or at least a little wet. That said the weather is beautiful so I don't want to wish it away
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DiddyDec
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I don't know where you live but it is sunny af here.
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
I don't know where you live but it is sunny af here.
Same here, but its not warm. Not here in the southeast anyway. It is beautifully sunny, but it is also dry, frosty and cold.

This is the longest spell of sunshine this whole year. No rain for nearly two weeks. Sunny skies for all that time barring one day of cloud. Pure bliss
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A_J_B
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...-kill-covid-19

Studies have shown that other coronaviruses are seasonal, generally limited to the winter. They thrive the least in warm, humid climates and the most in cool, dry climates.

Yeah, our weather right now in the UK isn't great for it. Cold, frosty, dry, we need something warmer or at least a little wet. That said the weather is beautiful so I don't want to wish it away
Interesting...So the Indian summer is hopefully going to obliterate it, not sure how long after that will happen in the UK.
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by A_J_B)
Interesting...So the Indian summer is hopefully going to obliterate it, not sure how long after that will happen in the UK.
what indian summer
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ForestShadow
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Hopefully but there are still cases (albeit less) in Africa and Australia right now which are hotter and more humid than us

Eg Aus today is 21C and 69% humidity

Hopefully it will subside a bit tho
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by ForestShadow)
Hopefully but there are still cases (albeit less) in Africa and Australia right now which are hotter and more humid than us

Eg Aus today is 21C and 69% humidity

Hopefully it will subside a bit tho
I don't think it will end, I think it will decrease. But yes, africa has been spared, but that's probably also to do with no travel from the west etc.

I'm also convinced it struggles to survive in extremely cold, dry tempreatures. Russia, which shares a 2,600 mile border with China...has just 147 cases, all of which are basically in Moscow. I think they closed their border ages ago which helped too.
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gjd800
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Pretty warm in Spain and Iran, mind
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Drewski
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...-kill-covid-19

Studies have shown that other coronaviruses are seasonal, generally limited to the winter. They thrive the least in warm, humid climates and the most in cool, dry climates.

Yeah, our weather right now in the UK isn't great for it. Cold, frosty, dry, we need something warmer or at least a little wet. That said the weather is beautiful so I don't want to wish it away
May.

It's a guess. They don't know if it will with this one.

(Original post by gjd800)
Pretty warm in Spain and Iran, mind
Not at this time of year, though. And plenty of snowy mountains in both right now.
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by gjd800)
Pretty warm in Spain and Iran, mind
Iran is actually quite a cold country in winter. They get a lot of snow. Only southern spain is hot all year round, most coronaviruses cases in spain are in madrid, the centre of the country, madrid can be quite a cold city at times
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gjd800
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
Iran is actually quite a cold country in winter. They get a lot of snow. Only southern spain is hot all year round, most coronaviruses cases in spain are in madrid, the centre of the country, madrid can be quite a cold city at times
(Original post by Drewski)
May.

It's a guess. They don't know if it will with this one.


Not at this time of year, though. And plenty of snowy mountains in both right now.
Aye, suppose their temps will double by June, but ours climb so high. 17 degrees average in Iran now, our average is 19 in June. I'm not sure it'll make so big a difference here as is being floated

I suppose my point is for people not to see this and get complacent
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by gjd800)
Aye, suppose their temps will double by June, but ours climb so high. 17 degrees average in Iran now, our average is 19 in June. I'm not sure it'll make so big a difference here as is being floated

I suppose my point is for people not to see this and get complacent
China's research suggests that it falls for every 1C temp increase.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
China's research suggests that it falls for every 1C temp increase.
Falls by what percentage and every 1C increase above what baseline?
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Wōden
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(Original post by gjd800)
Aye, suppose their temps will double by June, but ours climb so high. 17 degrees average in Iran now, our average is 19 in June. I'm not sure it'll make so big a difference here as is being floated

I suppose my point is for people not to see this and get complacent
That's average for the country as a whole, but it's not a particularly useful gauge considering the climate varies quite a bit across the country. The average temp in London and the South East (also the most populous areas of the UK) during the Summer months is around 25c, from my own experience living in East Anglia, most days it hovers in the high 20s to low 30s, high 30s is not that uncommon either, personally I find it unbearably hot here sometimes.

In theory, just having the longer hours of daylight could help, as virons can't survive very long when exposed to UV.
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Treetop321
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The problem in some parts of Africa is that they may not actually have testing kits etc. available so it's hard to know if it's the climate or the development of the country which is impacting the numbers.
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Quady
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...-kill-covid-19

Studies have shown that other coronaviruses are seasonal, generally limited to the winter. They thrive the least in warm, humid climates and the most in cool, dry climates.

Yeah, our weather right now in the UK isn't great for it. Cold, frosty, dry, we need something warmer or at least a little wet. That said the weather is beautiful so I don't want to wish it away
(Original post by Drewski)
May.

It's a guess. They don't know if it will with this one.


Not at this time of year, though. And plenty of snowy mountains in both right now.
Someone tell India, its midnight, 29°C, 73% humidity.
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by Wōden)
That's average for the country as a whole, but it's not a particularly useful gauge considering the climate varies quite a bit across the country. The average temp in London and the South East (also the most populous areas of the UK) during the Summer months is around 25c, from my own experience living in East Anglia, most days it hovers in the high 20s to low 30s, high 30s is not that uncommon either, personally I find it unbearably hot here sometimes.

In theory, just having the longer hours of daylight could help, as virons can't survive very long when exposed to UV.
Yeah, East Anglian summers can be pretty damn hot. Fortunately we also have the lowest number of cases in the UK (the East of England). Lack of motorways and any decent public transport is starting to pay off
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adam271
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It's a complicated picture.

But social interactions clearly a significant proportion of it. As does the climate.
The issue at the moment is I dont see us killing this thing.
For this virus to die it needs for every country to have zero new infections. (Seems unlikely).

Failing that, we need a vaccine to be created. We haven't managed to eradicate other cornoviruses with 100% success so seems unlikely we will with this one.
But I'm pig ignorant about this crap.
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Quady
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
Yeah, East Anglian summers can be pretty damn hot. Fortunately we also have the lowest number of cases in the UK (the East of England). Lack of motorways and any decent public transport is starting to pay off
But next to zero humidity.
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by Quady)
But next to zero humidity.
Yep, however the southeastern USA will be okay, the humidity down there is terrible.
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