Warm weather may help kill coronavirus

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Napp
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Ferrograd)
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...-kill-covid-19

Studies have shown that other coronaviruses are seasonal, generally limited to the winter. They thrive the least in warm, humid climates and the most in cool, dry climates.

Yeah, our weather right now in the UK isn't great for it. Cold, frosty, dry, we need something warmer or at least a little wet. That said the weather is beautiful so I don't want to wish it away
You'll forgive me for saying that these studies are manifestly codswollop. We need only look at SE Asia, Australasia et al.
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Rock Fan
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#22
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Well the bad news is then the UK is going quite cold by the weekend barely above 7C
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TCA2b
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But it's okay, everyone is heeding the government's advice and staying at home. :`)
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Napp
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(Original post by TCA2b)
But it's okay, everyone is heeding the government's advice and staying at home. :`)
They are?!?
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Greywolftwo
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#25
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#25
Warm weather does not affect the virus, that’s just a myth.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Greywolftwo)
Warm weather does not affect the virus, that’s just a myth.
It does affect other viruses. It is known for definite that Coronavirus cannot survive above 40 centigrade, but that's very hot. The current unknown is what will happen when we have strong sunshine. During the summer, the UV component of sunlight shoots up (why we get sunburn) and it is thought that, like many other viruses, Corvid-19 won't do well in UV.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graph...v-2-structure/
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Greywolftwo
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
It does affect other viruses. It is known for definite that Coronavirus cannot survive above 40 centigrade, but that's very hot. The current unknown is what will happen when we have strong sunshine. During the summer, the UV component of sunlight shoots up (why we get sunburn) and it is thought that, like many other viruses, Corvid-19 won't do well in UV.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graph...v-2-structure/
Probably yes.
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DoritoEvie
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I don't think so. Dubai has warmer weather already. Same with Australia, who are now entering Autumn but are still experiencing temperatures between 20-30°C, and both of their cases are rising.
Fingers crossed, but it seems unlikely.

EDIT: The UV argument from above can be plausible.
Last edited by DoritoEvie; 2 days ago
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by DoritoEvie)
I don't think so. Dubai has warmer weather already. Same with Australia, who are now entering Autumn but are still experiencing temperatures between 20-30°C, and both of their cases are rising.
Fingers crossed, but it seems unlikely.

EDIT: The UV argument from above can be plausible.
The UV light thing is about droplet transmission outdoors. It's not difficult to conceive that most spreading incidents in the countries mentioned are taking place in indoor air conditioned environments. Nearly everyone spends nearly all their time in such conditions in places like the Gulf states.

I'm not being over hopeful, but there is some grounds for hoping we will at least get somewhat less transmission into the summer.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Wōden)
from my own experience living in East Anglia, most days it hovers in the high 20s to low 30s, high 30s is not that uncommon either, personally I find it unbearably hot here sometimes.
Interesting. I'm not sure what part of East Anglia you live in, but this isn't the climate.

Most days in summer (ie. mid-June to mid-September), the temperature is 22°C-24°C. We occasionally have warmer spells where the temperature gets up to 28°C-30°C, but these are fairly short-lived heatwaves. We rarely (a few days a year) get temperatures over 32°C and high 30s are rare.

Given you've said that most days the temperature is high 20s to low 30s, and 'high 30s are not uncommon', this rather leads me to think that you neither live in East Anglia nor the UK. Which would sort of make sense, in more than one way.
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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There is a lot of social influence when it comes to the spread of viruses, too. At the coldest times of the year, people are more likely to congregate inside doing indoor activities instead of being more spread out in the fresh air, not to mention the fact you have people travelling the country over Christmas to visit friends and family, which makes any previously localised infection immediately more widespread.

If temperature (as in, temperatures that the UK will reach - obviously very hot temperatures kill them) killed viruses, there would be NONE in the summer months at all, and we know that it is certainly possible to get flu etc in the summer .. albeit less likely.
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Wōden
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Interesting. I'm not sure what part of East Anglia you live in, but this isn't the climate.

Most days in summer (ie. mid-June to mid-September), the temperature is 22°C-24°C. We occasionally have warmer spells where the temperature gets up to 28°C-30°C, but these are fairly short-lived heatwaves. We rarely (a few days a year) get temperatures over 32°C and high 30s are rare.

Given you've said that most days the temperature is high 20s to low 30s, and 'high 30s are not uncommon', this rather leads me to think that you neither live in East Anglia nor the UK. Which would sort of make sense, in more than one way.
Excuse me? I don't know what hidden agenda you believe I have to lie not only about where I live, but also to misrepresent the climate of that area. I assure you my life is not that interesting.

I was born in and have spent most of my life in Essex, and I have never lived outside of the UK. And from my own observations, at least in my area of the county, it is usually hot here in the Summer, especially between June and August. I don't know what else to tell you really, take it up the my thermometer, I guess.
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A_J_B
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Ferrograd)
what indian summer
Lol
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TCA2b
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(Original post by DoritoEvie)
I don't think so. Dubai has warmer weather already. Same with Australia, who are now entering Autumn but are still experiencing temperatures between 20-30°C, and both of their cases are rising.
Fingers crossed, but it seems unlikely.

EDIT: The UV argument from above can be plausible.
True, but some of those papers in the OP's article are arguing that humidity, wind speed and air visibility all matter as well, so that dry arid places come next after cold and temperate places for being conducive to a coronavirus's spread. That said, the more human contact there is, the more it will assist in its spread regardless, but it should at least make it harder if the weather doesn't favour it.

Also, I think it would be worth looking at the rate of spread in each area rather than merely focusing on whether cases are rising in the abstract.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Wōden)
Excuse me? I don't know what hidden agenda you believe I have to lie not only about where I live, but also to misrepresent the climate of that area. I assure you my life is not that interesting.

I was born in and have spent most of my life in Essex, and I have never lived outside of the UK. And from my own observations, at least in my area of the county, it is usually hot here in the Summer, especially between June and August. I don't know what else to tell you really, take it up the my thermometer, I guess.
Indeed, which was why it was so odd that you would suggest Essex had a climate more like Berlin or Paris than the UK. In any case, I suggest you get a new thermometer then:

https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/binarie...met-office.pdf

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Ferrograd
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Indeed, which was why it was so odd that you would suggest Essex had a climate more like Berlin or Paris than the UK. In any case, I suggest you get a new thermometer then:

https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/binarie...met-office.pdf

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The new uk record from the other year 38.7C was also recorded at Cambridge
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Ferrograd
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I live in essex too, and the east of england is the hottest and driest place in the UK. I was in North Norfolk last summer. F*cking boiling, 30C+ weather, it was the hottest place in the country at the time. The contient of East Anglia is most similar to continetnal europe, it can be one of the coldest places in winter too
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Wōden
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(Original post by Napp)
You'll forgive me for saying that these studies are manifestly codswollop. We need only look at SE Asia, Australasia et al.
Be that as it may, the rate of spread still doesn't appear to be quite as fast in those regions as it is in Europe or North America.

https://www.covid19info.live/
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Ferrograd)
I live in essex too, and the east of england is the hottest and driest place in the UK.
Umm, can you not read? The climate summary from the Met Office I've just posted above literally says: "...the London area, which tends to be the warmest area of the UK."

The contient of East Anglia is most similar to continetnal europe, it can be one of the coldest places in winter too
No, it's not. It has a temperate maritime climate which is totally different from that found on the continental mainland of Europe.
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Ferrograd
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Umm, can you not read? The climate summary from the Met Office I've just posted above literally says: "...the London area, which tends to be the warmest area of the UK."



No, it's not. It has a temperate maritime climate which is totally different from that found on the continental mainland of Europe.
The London area, yes, except none of the weather records have been recorded in London with them most often being in Eastern/southeastern England.

Depending on what weather station they use, if they use heathrow then I doubt any records broken in London. London is just influenced by the UHI.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/norfolk/...00/8989673.stm

"Norfolk's close proximity to the European continent means that during periods of sustained easterly winds, the county can, from time to time, experience a true taste of a continental climate".

"Indeed the area around Thetford has as many ground frosts as much of Scotland!"


Not all the time, but right now is an example. Never said it did have a continental climate. I just said it was probably the closest thing we have to it in the UK.
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