Harryv24
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Which University experience is better as a whole?
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forbearne
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It depends on what you mean by uni experience - Cambridge will make you work harder than anywhere else but it is an intellectually stimulating experience. If you apply to Bristol, what course would you go for?
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Mona123456
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I know someone doing Engineering at Cambridge and they’re absolutely loving it. It’s likely that the workload would be higher at Cambridge, but in terms of being academically stimulating, as well as prestige and career opportunities, it’s second to none. Maybe consider whether you prefer the collegiate system or a city Uni - they will have different atmospheres, pros and cons. Although, contrary to popular belief, people at Cambridge can have social lives and enjoy themselves too

At the end of the day, they’re both great Unis though so go with the place and course you prefer most.
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Harryv24
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(Original post by forbearne)
It depends on what you mean by uni experience - Cambridge will make you work harder than anywhere else but it is an intellectually stimulating experience. If you apply to Bristol, what course would you go for?
Mechanical Engineering or Engineering Design.
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Harryv24
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(Original post by Mona123456)
I know someone doing Engineering at Cambridge and they’re absolutely loving it. It’s likely that the workload would be higher at Cambridge, but in terms of being academically stimulating, as well as prestige and career opportunities, it’s second to none. Maybe consider whether you prefer the collegiate system or a city Uni - they will have different atmospheres, pros and cons. Although, contrary to popular belief, people at Cambridge can have social lives and enjoy themselves too

At the end of the day, they’re both great Unis though so go with the place and course you prefer most.
The social lives thing is a big worry of mine.I have heard that Cambridge social life isn't comparable to other unis, because it is so much worse.However, Bristol is said to have an absolutely amazing one.
However, I really do want to be stimulated academically, and I want to be able to push myself so much.I aspire to come out of uni having made connections and able to make my own start-up, ready to take on the world.I know it sounds childish but that is my vision for what I want to be like out of uni.

Right now my dilemma is this:
I'm afraid that both unis could be at the opposite ends of the spectrum.Cambridge, amazing academically, but horrible socially and incredibly stressful.The idea of being in uni and being jealous of my friends having fun at other unis horrifies me, I feel like it would be draining mentally.
I love the social atmosphere of bristol but I dont know if it is a big step down teaching wise from Cambridge, and I dont want to limit myself academically by going there.

I dont know how valid these worries are, but this is what keeps going around and around in my head and I can't seem to find my way out of it
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Mona123456
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(Original post by Harryv24)
The social lives thing is a big worry of mine.I have heard that Cambridge social life isn't comparable to other unis, because it is so much worse.However, Bristol is said to have an absolutely amazing one.
However, I really do want to be stimulated academically, and I want to be able to push myself so much.I aspire to come out of uni having made connections and able to make my own start-up, ready to take on the world.I know it sounds childish but that is my vision for what I want to be like out of uni.

Right now my dilemma is this:
I'm afraid that both unis could be at the opposite ends of the spectrum.Cambridge, amazing academically, but horrible socially and incredibly stressful.The idea of being in uni and being jealous of my friends having fun at other unis horrifies me, I feel like it would be draining mentally.
I love the social atmosphere of bristol but I dont know if it is a big step down teaching wise from Cambridge, and I dont want to limit myself academically by going there.

I dont know how valid these worries are, but this is what keeps going around and around in my head and I can't seem to find my way out of it
Honestly, I don’t really know the answer to this as I don’t know enough about the courses at Cambridge and Bristol. I think both Bristol and Cambridge are what you make them; it is more than possible to have a social life and be academically stimulated at both. At Cambridge you’re more likely to be academically stimulated, and at Bristol you’re more likely to have a social life. But, I’d also consider the campus style, teaching style, assessment style, course structure and content, and where you feel you’d be happiest. Good luck with your decision and I’m sure things will work out and you’ll be happy wherever you choose
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Paralove
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What do you mean by social life? If it's going out to clubs and stuff, yeah Bristol is better (I'm from there, studied at Cambridge) in terms of bigger and better clubs, bars etc. But Cambridge is actually good fun too. Plus, there is *so* much going on in terms of social things outside of drinking and clubbing that I haven't really seen matched anywhere else.

Your course will definitely be high workload but it would be to an extent in many places. However, considering the higher workloads, I don't know anyone at other unis so involved in extra curricular stuff like Cambridge students can be tbh. It needs good organisation of your time but it's more than doable.

In addition, because of the strong financial support available, and that you won't typically have a part time job during the term time (short terms, long holidays to work in which I did) it means your free time is genuinely free rather than then having to go to your job in an evening or weekend or whenever. It creates a much leveller playing field for accessing the extra curricular things.
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Harryv24
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(Original post by Paralove)
What do you mean by social life? If it's going out to clubs and stuff, yeah Bristol is better (I'm from there, studied at Cambridge) in terms of bigger and better clubs, bars etc. But Cambridge is actually good fun too. Plus, there is *so* much going on in terms of social things outside of drinking and clubbing that I haven't really seen matched anywhere else.

Your course will definitely be high workload but it would be to an extent in many places. However, considering the higher workloads, I don't know anyone at other unis so involved in extra curricular stuff like Cambridge students can be tbh. It needs good organisation of your time but it's more than doable.

In addition, because of the strong financial support available, and that you won't typically have a part time job during the term time (short terms, long holidays to work in which I did) it means your free time is genuinely free rather than then having to go to your job in an evening or weekend or whenever. It creates a much leveller playing field for accessing the extra curricular things.
This is a very good response, I did not think of these factors before.I'm really curious, what is a standard day in the life of a student at Cambridge? You mentioned that you have seen certain social things that arent really matched anywhere else, can you give me some examples?
If you have any friends in other unis, what would you say the key differences in uni life are between you and them?

Thank you so much for your help
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Paralove
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(Original post by Harryv24)
This is a very good response, I did not think of these factors before.I'm really curious, what is a standard day in the life of a student at Cambridge? You mentioned that you have seen certain social things that arent really matched anywhere else, can you give me some examples?
If you have any friends in other unis, what would you say the key differences in uni life are between you and them?

Thank you so much for your help
It's a question I see often, and at some unis the going out scene is the biggest thing, whereas although it's very popular in Cambridge too, it's very much not the main offering.

The typical day in the life massively varies depending on your subject. As an engineer, you will spend most of your working day in the department, with maybe going back to college or to a cafe for lunch. You'll have morning and maybe some afternoon lectures. Search up the CU engineering society, which may have put a typical timetable somewhere.

As I mentioned with the financial support, you don't have to factor in part time work during the term, so you can structure your afternoons, evenings and weekends as works for you. You'll definitely need to be working most days, but it depends how you find the work. I usually did at least some work every day, but I had a friend who never worked on Sundays and she stuck to that.

In terms of social things - go to the CUSU website (student union) and find the clubs and societies list. It's huge. There are literally hundreds - and that's at uni level. Colleges also have their own versions of some of the more popular ones and for sports teams, so if you're into sport it's accessible at any level.

Whilst I was studying, the key differences were: I worried less about money bc of the support; which in turn meant I got involved in way more fun things, talks, events, committees etc as I had the time; I worked way harder than other friends (I distinctly remember finishing the first term having done countless pieces of work, to have someone post on Facebook the week after I got home about how they had just handed in their first assignment.....but I would rather get more out of my degree so ykno); and I felt like I had a much greater breadth of opportunity in every single way tbh. I loved my time as a student - not saying it didn't get difficult at times, but I think everything I got out of it both academically and on a personal level has had such a huge impact on me. There were very few people I went to school with who also went to uni, but those who did were all around the country, and not one (in London, Liverpool, Manchester or Bristol areas) had the same amount of extracurricular clubs and societies on offer, let alone the networking and all that jazz.
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randomlyspecific
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If you are looking at Bristol's Engineering Design course, the main difference with Cambridge is it has a year in industry, so it will be 5 year for MEng. That course is ranked as high or even higher than the Cambridge Engineering course. The other difference is there is no interview.
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Harryv24
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(Original post by Paralove)
It's a question I see often, and at some unis the going out scene is the biggest thing, whereas although it's very popular in Cambridge too, it's very much not the main offering.

The typical day in the life massively varies depending on your subject. As an engineer, you will spend most of your working day in the department, with maybe going back to college or to a cafe for lunch. You'll have morning and maybe some afternoon lectures. Search up the CU engineering society, which may have put a typical timetable somewhere.

As I mentioned with the financial support, you don't have to factor in part time work during the term, so you can structure your afternoons, evenings and weekends as works for you. You'll definitely need to be working most days, but it depends how you find the work. I usually did at least some work every day, but I had a friend who never worked on Sundays and she stuck to that.

In terms of social things - go to the CUSU website (student union) and find the clubs and societies list. It's huge. There are literally hundreds - and that's at uni level. Colleges also have their own versions of some of the more popular ones and for sports teams, so if you're into sport it's accessible at any level.

Whilst I was studying, the key differences were: I worried less about money bc of the support; which in turn meant I got involved in way more fun things, talks, events, committees etc as I had the time; I worked way harder than other friends (I distinctly remember finishing the first term having done countless pieces of work, to have someone post on Facebook the week after I got home about how they had just handed in their first assignment.....but I would rather get more out of my degree so ykno); and I felt like I had a much greater breadth of opportunity in every single way tbh. I loved my time as a student - not saying it didn't get difficult at times, but I think everything I got out of it both academically and on a personal level has had such a huge impact on me. There were very few people I went to school with who also went to uni, but those who did were all around the country, and not one (in London, Liverpool, Manchester or Bristol areas) had the same amount of extracurricular clubs and societies on offer, let alone the networking and all that jazz.
Thank you so much for your response. In a way, this has made my decision even harder hahaha, as I was leaning towards Bristol.
The financial support thing is a big one, and I do want to get the most out of my degree, I love being busy.
For the sports teams thing, I am aware that some colleges are distinctively better than others athletically.
I want to play basketball and by doing some research, I have seen that my college's team is horrible to non-existent (Clare).
Is it possible to play for other colleges if that is the case?
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Harryv24
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(Original post by randomlyspecific)
If you are looking at Bristol's Engineering Design course, the main difference with Cambridge is it has a year in industry, so it will be 5 year for MEng. That course is ranked as high or even higher than the Cambridge Engineering course. The other difference is there is no interview.
If I would go to Bristol I would almost definitely study Engineering Design. I just got an offer from it and it just looks like such a useful course to study. I feel like it would give you a very good broad understanding of engineering and provide you with skills essential to be innovative and run massive interdisciplinary teams in the future.
Do you know anyone that has studied this course? What are their opinions on it?
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randomlyspecific
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Both Bristol Engineering Design and Cambridge Engineering will be broad. Both are top rated, with the Bristol course sometimes rated higher. The key difference, as I said, is the Bristol one has a year in industry so it will take 5 years.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Harryv24)
Thank you so much for your response. In a way, this has made my decision even harder hahaha, as I was leaning towards Bristol.
The financial support thing is a big one, and I do want to get the most out of my degree, I love being busy.
For the sports teams thing, I am aware that some colleges are distinctively better than others athletically.
I want to play basketball and by doing some research, I have seen that my college's team is horrible to non-existent (Clare).
Is it possible to play for other colleges if that is the case?
College sports teams change by 33% every year! You can't play for another College, in the same way you can;t play for another school team - unless there is some partnering agreement because the sport is so minor or the College so small it can't field a team otherwise. You've just got to make it a better team - no College is permanently better than any other at sports, the turnover of students is too great.
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