Should universities cut tuition fees for next year if we are still online?

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Poll: Should fees for 20/21 be reduced if the current situation continues?
Yes. (21)
77.78%
No. (6)
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vicvic38
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#1
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Let's all be realistic about this: these social distancing measures have the potential to go on far longer than the end of this academic year. I reckon it will severely impact the beginning of the next year as well, if not well into 2021.

So, if teaching remains online, what right do universities have to charge us as much as they do for it? I didn't sign up for an online correspondence course. I signed up for access to some of the best libraries and minds in my field. My course isn't expensive to run for a single student. Per week you organise about 8-12 hours of lectures, and then you have 2-3 hours of tutorial or class time.

I'm considering just taking a year out and coming back later, because this is a shambles. I'm not demanding they drop their prices, just that perhaps we can have them justified to us, properly.
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ElisaSargent
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(Original post by vicvic38)
Let's all be realistic about this: these social distancing measures have the potential to go on far longer than the end of this academic year. I reckon it will severely impact the beginning of the next year as well, if not well into 2021.

So, if teaching remains online, what right do universities have to charge us as much as they do for it? I didn't sign up for an online correspondence course. I signed up for access to some of the best libraries and minds in my field. My course isn't expensive to run for a single student. Per week you organise about 8-12 hours of lectures, and then you have 2-3 hours of tutorial or class time.

I'm considering just taking a year out and coming back later, because this is a shambles. I'm not demanding they drop their prices, just that perhaps we can have them justified to us, properly.
I agree
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ThomH97
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Tbh a lot of courses are already basically a preacher trying to get you to buy their book.
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Toki the Dumdum
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#4
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#4
I don't really care about the cost of the course. As I'll be going into my final year, I'm more worried about the regulation of examinations.

Guaranteeing physical exams rather than remote ones will be of biggest importance to me.
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DeesideEwan
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#5
They should but they won’t just like U.S collages and unis also.
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PQ
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(Original post by vicvic38)
Let's all be realistic about this: these social distancing measures have the potential to go on far longer than the end of this academic year. I reckon it will severely impact the beginning of the next year as well, if not well into 2021.

So, if teaching remains online, what right do universities have to charge us as much as they do for it? I didn't sign up for an online correspondence course. I signed up for access to some of the best libraries and minds in my field. My course isn't expensive to run for a single student. Per week you organise about 8-12 hours of lectures, and then you have 2-3 hours of tutorial or class time.

I'm considering just taking a year out and coming back later, because this is a shambles. I'm not demanding they drop their prices, just that perhaps we can have them justified to us, properly.
Have you looked at how much Open University charges for a distance learning degree?
And how much reduced the student loan to cover your living costs is if you change to distance learning...:flute:

Be careful what you wish for -£6k fees with £0 maintenance loan isn’t more affordable...
Last edited by PQ; 2 weeks ago
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KittyN
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#7
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During the strikes, unis kept emphasising that our tuition fees didn't just pay for teaching, but also buildings, libraries, and other services.

If we don't have access to these things, surely our tuition fees should be reduced in line with this.
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badbadgerlottie
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#8
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#8
I’ve an offer for mental health nursing at Cardiff in September, I haven’t a clue how they are going to provide the practice and placement aspects of the degree if it’s still online !
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londonmyst
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#9
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Yes.
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Anonymous #1
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#10
I wish but it seems unlikely. The students who are currently enrolled in uni are facing the brunt of the crisis, particularly the final year students. If it was any cohort that should receive some sort of reimbursement, it would be them lol bless em. But I doubt ANY cohort will be seeing a reduced tuition fee though, as you're still receiving tuition and support from the uni... and staff still need to be paid, buildings still need to be maintained, resources still need to be bought, research still needs to be funded and undertaken etc.
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adam271
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It's a difficult one.
The university needs the money
The students shouldnt be charged a stupid amount for accessing powerpoint slides with the rare voice over.

Maybe the government should reduce the fees to £3000 for this and next academic year. With the £6000 shortfall being covered by the government to ensure universities do not lose any funding.
The government covers it anyway they are just waiving the £6000 repayments that most never get paid back fully anyway.

Problem with this though it is not the governments problem but the universities.

I should add that this is not an immediate issue. Student loans can take decades to pay off so maybe an issue for another day.
Last edited by adam271; 1 day ago
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Catherine1973
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#12
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#12
If we are still doing it online next year we need more than what half my lectures are doing, sticking up last years recordings for us to use. It’s fine as a temporary stop gap but not ideal.
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Catherine1973
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#13
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Oh and I don’t qualify for a loan so pay the full £9k myself.
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kkboyk
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#14
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Depends, sure an agreement can be met between uni and students, but I doubt anything will change (especially since students will have a high demand which unis can't meet). British unis are extremely reliant on tuition fees due to how underfunded many unis are as well as the amount wasted on advertisement to keep the number of students applying consistent so that they can continue running the course (we are talking £millions). Apart from that, it will barely make any difference to students even if they reduce tuition fees for a year (this is only for home students) because majority of people won't ever pay the full tuition fees or barely reach half way. Yes there should be some sort of arrangement for international students, for home students its a lot more tricky.
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