ellioondra
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Hi! I am currently revising the different themes in the novella. Can anyone please help me with a detailed analysis of "...little man... damned Juggernaut" regarding violence/evil? I was thinking something along the irony used, the juxtaposition and context around a juggernaut.
If you have any more good quotes I can use that would be greatly appreciated
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xozxexo
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(Original post by ellioondra)
Hi! I am currently revising the different themes in the novella. Can anyone please help me with a detailed analysis of "...little man... damned Juggernaut" regarding violence/evil? I was thinking something along the irony used, the juxtaposition and context around a juggernaut.
If you have any more good quotes I can use that would be greatly appreciated
Hi yes of course!

I havent done Jekyll and Hyde in over 2 years now but I can give you an an attempt

The theme of violence:

So the word that sticks out to me is 'Juggarnaut'. Basically this is a wagon where worshippers were thought to throw themselves under to be crushed to death. This could be used to describe Hyde because it represents the violence and power in which Hyde lives with- like when he ran into the child and trampled over.

However, Enfield did only say this when he witnessed the man knock over the little girl so the phrase in which enfiled said could be used to describe the reaction everyone has to Hyde rather than the violence and evil Hyde is himself. Obviously this changes throughout the book and we learn that Hyde is infact evil and violent but this could be a good quote to start the essay with as you are then exploring the theme and commenting on how it changes which will give you extra marks.

Additionally the word 'Damned' which in many relgious traditions means that when someone is damned, they are doomed to sugger horribly in hell forever. It suggests that Enfield is saying that upon first glimps of Hyde, he thinks he should belong in Hell.

other quotes to use for violence would be:
'All of a sudden he broke out in a great flame of anger, stamping with his foot, brandishing the cane and carrying on like a madman'
'Mr Hyde broke out of all bounds and clubbed him to earth'
'With ape-like fury he was trampling his victim under foot'

The theme of evil:

Additionally the word 'Damned' which in many relgious traditions means that when someone is damned, they are doomed to sugger horribly in hell forever. It suggests that Enfield is saying that upon first glimps of Hyde, he thinks he should belong in Hell. This can link to evil because well, Hell is evil and links to Satan. Enfields innital reaction of Hyde is also relfected in Utterson when he finally meets Hyde. Utterson says "Satan's signature upon a face". These first impressions of Hyde are cruital at protraying Hyde's evilness to the reader.

The 'little man' quote can be used to suggest how jekyll's evil side is hidden away from the public view in order to protect Jekyll's reputation. Its rather secretive and also creates a sense of mystery.

other quotes to use for evil:
'Satan's signature upon a face'
'man trampled calmy over child's body' (shows hes comfortable with violence and has no sympathy or morals)


other quotes you should consider reasearching/ looking up:

'would have estranged Damon and Prythius' (Damon and Pathius were used an example of faithful friendship in the 18th & 19th centuries. Lanyon says the difference between him and Jekyll 'would have estranged Damon and Prythius' suggests that it was more of a minor argument. It could be explored in the theme of friendship or good vs evil as Lanyon is battling Jekyll about his evil intentions with Hyde)
'pede claudo' (its an abreddreviated reference to the latin phrase "pede poena claudo" which means "punishment comes limping". Its used to show Utterson's belief that there is a cost to what Jekyll is doing)


I hope this helps!

If you need anything else please let me know
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giella
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Without the context the quote is virtually meaningless. Who says it? Why? When? Where? About whom/what? If you don’t include the information you can’t examine the relationship between the language and the context.
But really you shouldn’t be learning quotes. It’s not your job for English. Your task is to know the text, its plot and its characters as well as you can. All the language you need is in the extract you get given. You could revise a hundred quotes and not one of them could be suitable for the exam question you eventually get given. Knowledge of the rest of the text can be demonstrated through the things I just mentioned and this advice comes straight from the exam board.

Reducing your knowledge of the text down to quotes will limit you and it’s not what English is about. Even rehearsing things to say in terms of analysis is not useful really as your analysis should really depend on the point you’re making.
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giella
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And if I seriously have to mark one more essay featuring that damned trampling quote...Please just show a little originality.
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ellioondra
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(Original post by giella)
And if I seriously have to mark one more essay featuring that damned trampling quote...Please just show a little originality.
I'm just getting as many quotes as possible to be safe, I'm not necessarily going to include this in an essay. What quotes would you be pleased to see in an essay? Thanks for the criticism by the way, it actually helps haha
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ellioondra
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(Original post by giella)
Without the context the quote is virtually meaningless. Who says it? Why? When? Where? About whom/what? If you don’t include the information you can’t examine the relationship between the language and the context.
But really you shouldn’t be learning quotes. It’s not your job for English. Your task is to know the text, its plot and its characters as well as you can. All the language you need is in the extract you get given. You could revise a hundred quotes and not one of them could be suitable for the exam question you eventually get given. Knowledge of the rest of the text can be demonstrated through the things I just mentioned and this advice comes straight from the exam board.

Reducing your knowledge of the text down to quotes will limit you and it’s not what English is about. Even rehearsing things to say in terms of analysis is not useful really as your analysis should really depend on the point you’re making.
Are you sure that advice comes straight from the exam board? How should I not learn quotes - do you want me to fail haha? Personally, learning quotes practicing analysis is definitely useful for me (and I believe it is for most people), as the question in an exam asks to analyse quotes not only from the extract but in the novella as a whole. And there's only a certain extent that my 'knowledge of the rest of the text' will get me marks without having any knowledge on specific quotes.

Many quotes can have their analysis twisted in a way that suits the question. If I revise 100 good, perceptive quotes then they would most certainly be helpful in an exam. I'm not naturally good at English so I can't just think of a grade 9 analysis during an exam. Learning one helps me write a more structured response under time pressure as this way, I have a rough plan on what to write, keeping my answer concise. I also can use this as practice on how to properly pick apart a quote.

I am not looking to study English further for A- Level, so it's not my main priority by the way.
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ellioondra
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(Original post by xozxexo)
Hi yes of course!

I havent done Jekyll and Hyde in over 2 years now but I can give you an an attempt

The theme of violence:

So the word that sticks out to me is 'Juggarnaut'. Basically this is a wagon where worshippers were thought to throw themselves under to be crushed to death. This could be used to describe Hyde because it represents the violence and power in which Hyde lives with- like when he ran into the child and trampled over.

However, Enfield did only say this when he witnessed the man knock over the little girl so the phrase in which enfiled said could be used to describe the reaction everyone has to Hyde rather than the violence and evil Hyde is himself. Obviously this changes throughout the book and we learn that Hyde is infact evil and violent but this could be a good quote to start the essay with as you are then exploring the theme and commenting on how it changes which will give you extra marks.

Additionally the word 'Damned' which in many relgious traditions means that when someone is damned, they are doomed to sugger horribly in hell forever. It suggests that Enfield is saying that upon first glimps of Hyde, he thinks he should belong in Hell.

other quotes to use for violence would be:
'All of a sudden he broke out in a great flame of anger, stamping with his foot, brandishing the cane and carrying on like a madman'
'Mr Hyde broke out of all bounds and clubbed him to earth'
'With ape-like fury he was trampling his victim under foot'

The theme of evil:

Additionally the word 'Damned' which in many relgious traditions means that when someone is damned, they are doomed to sugger horribly in hell forever. It suggests that Enfield is saying that upon first glimps of Hyde, he thinks he should belong in Hell. This can link to evil because well, Hell is evil and links to Satan. Enfields innital reaction of Hyde is also relfected in Utterson when he finally meets Hyde. Utterson says "Satan's signature upon a face". These first impressions of Hyde are cruital at protraying Hyde's evilness to the reader.

The 'little man' quote can be used to suggest how jekyll's evil side is hidden away from the public view in order to protect Jekyll's reputation. Its rather secretive and also creates a sense of mystery.

other quotes to use for evil:
'Satan's signature upon a face'
'man trampled calmy over child's body' (shows hes comfortable with violence and has no sympathy or morals)


other quotes you should consider reasearching/ looking up:

'would have estranged Damon and Prythius' (Damon and Pathius were used an example of faithful friendship in the 18th & 19th centuries. Lanyon says the difference between him and Jekyll 'would have estranged Damon and Prythius' suggests that it was more of a minor argument. It could be explored in the theme of friendship or good vs evil as Lanyon is battling Jekyll about his evil intentions with Hyde)
'pede claudo' (its an abreddreviated reference to the latin phrase "pede poena claudo" which means "punishment comes limping". Its used to show Utterson's belief that there is a cost to what Jekyll is doing)


I hope this helps!

If you need anything else please let me know
Thank you so much for taking the time to help me, I greatly appreciate it! This is extremely useful for my revision Thanks for also recommending me other quotes, I'll be sure to look those up!
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giella
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(Original post by ellioondra)
Thank you so much for taking the time to help me, I greatly appreciate it! This is extremely useful for my revision Thanks for also recommending me other quotes, I'll be sure to look those up!
You can check last year’s examiner’s report. Whilst they don’t say not to revise quotes they strongly urge it can be done without. I have also worked as a marker and I know from experience that the better answers tend to focus on the language in the extract (which is given to you because it directly suits the question being asked) and relate the events within the extract to the character and plot development and the themes of the rest of the text. By overly focusing on language you miss opportunities to discuss structure, which far few people do and is generally only seen in the higher grades. It is a grand waste of time to be revising quotes when you don’t have to. The equivalent in chemistry would be to learn the periodic table or in maths to learn formulae that you will be given. You get given all the text you need to analyse in terms of language in the extract and that is more than enough to be getting on with. If you neglect the extract in favour of rehearsed analysis of quotes elsewhere, examiners do notice as it tends to impact on your AO1.

I wouldn’t recommend any specific quotes to be honest because literally anything can be analysed given the right question as a lens. The top band of marks is reserved for those who can show originality in their choice of evidence as a corollary of an original response.
I got given (and followed) the same advice for my unseen Shakespeare paper nearly 16 years ago for A level and I got 100%. I’ve given full marks frequently to people who didn’t use a single quote in their response outside of the specified extract. There is no substitute for knowing the text well. A top response for me shows in depth understanding of the text by analysing characters and events on a macro level to complement the micro-level analysis invited by the extract, not by inserting analysis of quotes arbitrarily harvested from elsewhere and often lacking the context required to ensure that their meaning comes through.
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xozxexo
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(Original post by giella)
You can check last year’s examiner’s report. Whilst they don’t say not to revise quotes they strongly urge it can be done without. I have also worked as a marker and I know from experience that the better answers tend to focus on the language in the extract (which is given to you because it directly suits the question being asked) and relate the events within the extract to the character and plot development and the themes of the rest of the text. By overly focusing on language you miss opportunities to discuss structure, which far few people do and is generally only seen in the higher grades. It is a grand waste of time to be revising quotes when you don’t have to. The equivalent in chemistry would be to learn the periodic table or in maths to learn formulae that you will be given. You get given all the text you need to analyse in terms of language in the extract and that is more than enough to be getting on with. If you neglect the extract in favour of rehearsed analysis of quotes elsewhere, examiners do notice as it tends to impact on your AO1.

I wouldn’t recommend any specific quotes to be honest because literally anything can be analysed given the right question as a lens. The top band of marks is reserved for those who can show originality in their choice of evidence as a corollary of an original response.
I got given (and followed) the same advice for my unseen Shakespeare paper nearly 16 years ago for A level and I got 100%. I’ve given full marks frequently to people who didn’t use a single quote in their response outside of the specified extract. There is no substitute for knowing the text well. A top response for me shows in depth understanding of the text by analysing characters and events on a macro level to complement the micro-level analysis invited by the extract, not by inserting analysis of quotes arbitrarily harvested from elsewhere and often lacking the context required to ensure that their meaning comes through.
You get an extract question but also a question about the whole book. Having specific quotes to back up your points with language and structure will only help to increase your marks and create a strong answer. The focus should definitely be on the language structure, context etc but id say quotes are definitely just as important! Especially if you're struggling for something to write. They give you a solid foundation to work off which is a life saver in them moments your mind goes blank
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ellioondra
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(Original post by xozxexo)
You get an extract question but also a question about the whole book. Having specific quotes to back up your points with language and structure will only help to increase your marks and create a strong answer. The focus should definitely be on the language structure, context etc but id say quotes are definitely just as important! Especially if you're struggling for something to write. They give you a solid foundation to work off which is a life saver in them moments your mind goes blank
Yes this is exactly what I mean!
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