Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
I will be making a change from Religions to Development Studies for my Msc at SOAS. I'm currently a SOAS student and want to apply for Msc Development Studies at SOAS itself.

However I'm really worried as I have a high 2.1 in my first year, a high 2.2 in my 2and year which was due to several issues with my health and as of this term, I have 2 development studies modules which have an overall 2.1 and a 2.2.

I'm unsure if they will take me and in the midst of the coronavirus where exams are being cancelled , I'm worried on how to proceed with the application.

How can I make my application stronger?
What should I include in my personal statements?
Also do I have a chance of being rejected?

Please help ?
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
I will be making a change from Religions to Development Studies for my Msc at SOAS. I'm currently a SOAS student and want to apply for Msc Development Studies at SOAS itself.

However I'm really worried as I have a high 2.1 in my first year, a high 2.2 in my 2and year which was due to several issues with my health and as of this term, I have 2 development studies modules which have an overall 2.1 and a 2.2.

I'm unsure if they will take me and in the midst of the coronavirus where exams are being cancelled , I'm worried on how to proceed with the application.

How can I make my application stronger?
What should I include in my personal statements?
Also do I have a chance of being rejected?

Please help ?
You're gonna be fine!

I graduated from SOAS with a 2:1 for my undergrad and got onto a MA course at SOAS too. The entry requirements seemed to be eased for a lot of students, they seem to offer places to people as long as they have money. For scholarships, I think it might be tough to get one in your current situation unless you can show evidence stating how your mental health had affected your studies. But if you're self funding/funding with student finance, SOAS will more than likely accept you, as both a returning SOAS student and also as a potential customer. I genuinely don't think you need to worry about being rejected.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#3
(Original post by Anonymous)
You're gonna be fine!

I graduated from SOAS with a 2:1 for my undergrad and got onto a MA course at SOAS too. The entry requirements seemed to be eased for a lot of students, they seem to offer places to people as long as they have money. For scholarships, I think it might be tough to get one in your current situation unless you can show evidence stating how your mental health had affected your studies. But if you're self funding/funding with student finance, SOAS will more than likely accept you, as both a returning SOAS student and also as a potential customer. I genuinely don't think you need to worry about being rejected.
Thanks!! Big relief on hearing this.
How was the application process? Like the personal statements and the references?
0
reply
nomadicexpat
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
(Original post by Anonymous)
You're gonna be fine!

I graduated from SOAS with a 2:1 for my undergrad and got onto a MA course at SOAS too. The entry requirements seemed to be eased for a lot of students, they seem to offer places to people as long as they have money. For scholarships, I think it might be tough to get one in your current situation unless you can show evidence stating how your mental health had affected your studies. But if you're self funding/funding with student finance, SOAS will more than likely accept you, as both a returning SOAS student and also as a potential customer. I genuinely don't think you need to worry about being rejected.
Do you think that's true across the board? I'm an international student and have applied to a MSc program in the Development department and am anxiously awaiting a decision. I already have a MA in another field, as well as Peace Corps + experience living/working abroad resulting in a strong SOP and reference, but my GPA is crap (~3.15 for both MA and BA, largely due to health issues in my late teens + one semester of my MA) and my transcript is, shall we say, colorful. I'm worried my transcript will be my downfall, and I haven't applied to any other schools because SOAS is by far my top choice.
Last edited by nomadicexpat; 1 week ago
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#5
Report 1 week ago
#5
(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks!! Big relief on hearing this.
How was the application process? Like the personal statements and the references?
The process isn't too long. It's just a quick summary of your education up until this point in time, a personal statement and two references. I think you may need to provide a writing sample for some of the courses, but having done an undergrad at SOAS already, you can just use an essay that you've written and gotten a decent grade for.

I think the key thing is to make sure you get two good references. So pick the lecturers that you've not only performed the best for, but also have a good rapport with. I'd take a lecturer that has a really good rapport with you over someone else that you performed well for, because they're more likely to write a personalized reference.

Also I forgot to mention in the earlier response that they should definitely be taking the Covid-19 situation into account. It might even be worth writing up a document explaining the impact that it has had on your studies - along with the strikes, I'm aware that this has absolutely shattered the academic year.
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
(Original post by nomadicexpat)
Do you think that's true across the board? I'm an international student and have applied to a MSc program in the Development department and am anxiously awaiting a decision. I already have a MA in another field, as well as Peace Corps + experience living/working abroad resulting in a strong SOP and reference, but my GPA is crap (~3.15 for both MA and BA, largely due to health issues in my late teens + one semester of my MA) and my transcript is, shall we say, colorful. I'm worried my transcript will be my downfall, and I haven't applied to any other schools because SOAS is by far my top choice.
I genuinely think you're going to be fine too! If you've already got a Masters and were able to complete the course, there's no way that they wouldn't take you as a serious contender for one of the Development MSc programs at SOAS. As you've pointed out, you also have good experiences and a strong reference so I think you should be okay.

Again, if the health bit is worrying you, you could always write up a quick summary of the different things that had affected you during your studies and submit it as additional information!
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#7
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by Anonymous)
The process isn't too long. It's just a quick summary of your education up until this point in time, a personal statement and two references. I think you may need to provide a writing sample for some of the courses, but having done an undergrad at SOAS already, you can just use an essay that you've written and gotten a decent grade for.

I think the key thing is to make sure you get two good references. So pick the lecturers that you've not only performed the best for, but also have a good rapport with. I'd take a lecturer that has a really good rapport with you over someone else that you performed well for, because they're more likely to write a personalized reference.

Also I forgot to mention in the earlier response that they should definitely be taking the Covid-19 situation into account. It might even be worth writing up a document explaining the impact that it has had on your studies - along with the strikes, I'm aware that this has absolutely shattered the academic year.
So far, I think I can only manage 1 reference. What do I do now??
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#8
Report 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by Anonymous)
So far, I think I can only manage 1 reference. What do I do now??
Double check the requirement for your particular MA/MSc to see how many references are required. Is this 1 lecturer/tutor aside from your personal tutor? Cause you can always use them too!
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#9
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#9
(Original post by Anonymous)
Double check the requirement for your particular MA/MSc to see how many references are required. Is this 1 lecturer/tutor aside from your personal tutor? Cause you can always use them too!
Yes shes my supervisor for my dissertation. And I haven't done very well in the essay and presentation for her module.
But the dissertation meetings seemed fine. She has also read the first chapter of my dissertation.
I dont know if she will give me a positive reference
0
reply
nomadicexpat
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 minute ago
#10
(Original post by Anonymous)
I genuinely think you're going to be fine too! If you've already got a Masters and were able to complete the course, there's no way that they wouldn't take you as a serious contender for one of the Development MSc programs at SOAS. As you've pointed out, you also have good experiences and a strong reference so I think you should be okay.

Again, if the health bit is worrying you, you could always write up a quick summary of the different things that had affected you during your studies and submit it as additional information!
Thank you! I'm afraid it's too late to include an additional summary as it's already with the academic review team. But it's near agony waiting for a decision!! It's been 2.5 weeks since submission and almost 1 weeks since being sent to the review team. Pleeeeeease just tell me already. :bawling:
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now? (select all that apply)

Lack of purpose or routine (119)
15.51%
Uncertainty around my education (124)
16.17%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (72)
9.39%
Isolating with family (51)
6.65%
Lack of support system (eg. Teachers, counsellors) (30)
3.91%
Lack of exercise/ability to be outside (66)
8.6%
Loneliness (81)
10.56%
Financial worries (32)
4.17%
Concern about myself or my loved ones getting ill (70)
9.13%
Exposure to negative news/social media (50)
6.52%
Lack of real life entertainment (eg. cinema, gigs, restaurants) (72)
9.39%

Watched Threads

View All