What will change in Society after Coronavirus ends?

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FemaleinDress
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I think people will be cautious about getting on packed buses and trains after for a while.
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ecolier
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(Original post by FemaleinDress)
I think people will be cautious about getting on packed buses and trains after for a while.
A lot:

(1) Taxes will go up (and this episode may well have an effect for the next 10 years, i.e. by 2030)

(2) A lot more people will realise that working from home is fine

(3) Many businesses have folded, leading to new opportunities (or just a big increase in unemployment)

(4) Air pollution has improved - people will realise that not travelling is OK / or there could be a rebound in travelling

(5) More surveillance worldwide

etc. etc. I will edit the post when I think of more points
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999tigger
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Taxes.
Recession.
There will be a lot of ventilators.
Joe Wicks will be rich.
Chris Whitty will be known for about a year or a lot longer if he gets it wrong.
Doctors and NHS workers will be lauded for a year, then things will go back to normal.
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Napp
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(Original post by ecolier)
A lot:

(1) Taxes will go up (and this episode may well have an effect for the next 10 years, i.e. by 2030)
Quite substantially i imagine given the spectacular spunking of money.

(3) Many businesses have folded, leading to new opportunities (or just a big increase in unemployment)
I imagine the choice of enterprises will be severely curtailed - just like with the airlines and banks back in '08 as small firms collapse and big ones merge

(5) More surveillance worldwide
Alas we are already seeing this on an unprecedented scale
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nexttime
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From: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6403426

1) More confidence with remote meetings and medical appointments. We've had the ability to do this for a long time, but people have been resistant to change. This will shock them out of it.
2) Restaurants which manage to enact delivery well come out stronger
3) I think more people will be prepared for the next one, including perhaps making long-term stockpiles of bog roll necessary food and gear.
4) We, as a society, will be better prepared for the next one
5) Economic impacts will be profound, but should be short-lived. Surely another few years of austerity though.
6) The reversal of environmental damage shows what we could achieve with better control of our CO2 emissions (including doing things like remote meetings to avoid unnecessary travel). We ignore it and go back to ruining the planet anyway.
7) 20 years from now the essay title for uni economics will be a choice between 'To what extent did the covid-19 outbreak have upon the long-term impact of Brexit' and 'compare and contract the UK's and Singapore's approach to covid-19 and subsequent outcomes'.
8) Disney and Netflix make so much money that they buy Westminster and are our new Imperial overlords, enacting an era of wonder and singing in the streets (on pain of death).
9) There's still no toilet roll in Tesco.
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Joinedup
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Possible that companies start to think about the need to maintain expensive offices when working from home seems fine - possibly suppressing the value of commercial property.

Probably a few bosses going to be wondering what they were paying some un-essential employees for (thinking about that trout lipped 'investment banker' woman who tweeted herself having a meltdown https://youtu.be/8vMGeNW8F4Q?t=1519 )

We've got an opportunity to think about the amount of risk transfer onto the weak in society we're letting businesses get away with
e.g. pseudo self employment going on at the moment - was hearing a 'self employed' removal van driver on the radio yesterday talking about how his boss didn't want to send him out on jobs and that he was running out of money - he was talking like an employee, self employment in that case appeared to be a sham. Sure there's a lot of this going on.

e.g. at my place we got letters saying furloughed employees would receive pay for 80% of their contracted hours... loads of the furloughed employees are on low or zero hours contracts and regularly work overtime to get up to full time amount of pay - makes it seem that either head office don't know what's going on in their own company or they're hoping to craftily claim 80% of average wages from the government and pay out to employees on lower contracted wages.

Overtime isn't the 'jam' on top of a decent number of contracted hours the way it used to be and the way government and business leaders seem to talk about it this doesn't seem to be well recognised - for many overtime is the bread and butter because the contracted hours have no relation to the amount of work the employer needs doing.
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