Sig.Whittingham
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Hi all.

I have seen this question asked before, but only with regards to bachelor's studies. I am currently applying for various master's courses in international accounting and have two main options:

1) Do the master's at my old university, Bournemouth which, according to thecompleteuniversityguide, currently has a low ranking of 70. I would benefit from a significant fee reduction from an academic excellence scholarship and graduate discount and wouldn't have to pay for accommodation as I can live with my parents.

2) Do the master's at a different university with a higher ranking but pay the full fee of ~£11000 + accommodation.

Having looked at the available courses, the modules and topics covered are mostly the same. Though I have no doubt there is some variation in the quality of content and delivery across different universities. In any case, I'm wondering how important the rankings are. Do employers actually look at the rankings tables? Or are they more interested in course accreditation and the modules studied? Will the university ranking matter if I'm awarded a high mark for my master's?

Many thanks.
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ajj2000
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What is the masters course you are looking at? Why are you looking to take a masters?
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Deggs_14
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Masters degrees are all about the department/ faculty, the university, and the academics / professors you work with. Yes rankings are very important to consider, especially at postgraduate level.
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Sig.Whittingham
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(Original post by ajj2000)
What is the masters course you are looking at? Why are you looking to take a masters?
International accounting. From what I've read, it's a niche and competitive market and the best way in is with a master's. However, I am also applying for graduate accounting jobs as an alternative.
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mnot
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(Original post by Sig.Whittingham)
Hi all.

I have seen this question asked before, but only with regards to bachelor's studies. I am currently applying for various master's courses in international accounting and have two main options:

1) Do the master's at my old university, Bournemouth which, according to thecompleteuniversityguide, currently has a low ranking of 70. I would benefit from a significant fee reduction from an academic excellence scholarship and graduate discount and wouldn't have to pay for accommodation as I can live with my parents.

2) Do the master's at a different university with a higher ranking but pay the full fee of ~£11000 + accommodation.

Having looked at the available courses, the modules and topics covered are mostly the same. Though I have no doubt there is some variation in the quality of content and delivery across different universities. In any case, I'm wondering how important the rankings are. Do employers actually look at the rankings tables? Or are they more interested in course accreditation and the modules studied? Will the university ranking matter if I'm awarded a high mark for my master's?

Many thanks.
Does uni ranking matter? No

Does prestige/employability/teaching/research/expertise matter? Absolutely, yes these are all worth considering.

Dont move uni just because CUG or Guardian tells you to, but if you want better exit prospects and think the increase in cost is worth the benefit then yes id move.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Sig.Whittingham)
International accounting. From what I've read, it's a niche and competitive market and the best way in is with a master's. However, I am also applying for graduate accounting jobs as an alternative.
I've worked in accounting - in a lot of countries - and never seen any big drive to recruit people with such masters degrees. What is your undergrad? Seriously - if you are a British citizen who largely expects to work in Britain go for professional training and sit professional exams. They are way more respected. If you really do want to have extra certification in IFRS pay a few hundred pounds and take a course people know about.

Its better to do specialist courses once qualified if you want a masters - or do an MBA.
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Sig.Whittingham
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(Original post by ajj2000)
I've worked in accounting - in a lot of countries - and never seen any big drive to recruit people with such masters degrees. What is your undergrad? Seriously - if you are a British citizen who largely expects to work in Britain go for professional training and sit professional exams. They are way more respected. If you really do want to have extra certification in IFRS pay a few hundred pounds and take a course people know about.

Its better to do specialist courses once qualified if you want a masters - or do an MBA.
Okay, thanks for your input, that's really useful advice. I think I'll focus on getting a graduate job then and leave the master's as an option for further on down the line.
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