un-knownnn
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#1
I'm contemplating whether to take geology a level as I was looking at courses since exams have been cancelled, and came across it. It seems quite interesting but I am yet to read up on it thoroughly, will do so shortly after this. For someone who hasn't done GCSE geography so i dont really have background in this, however, I have 5 months to catch up if I decide it interests me. Could someone give me a general overview as i looked at the course outline and was a bit overwhelmed as I said previously havent done geography gcse lol. Whew this was long appreciate anyone that read this! x
0
reply
un-knownnn
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#2
(Original post by un-knownnn)
I'm contemplating whether to take geology a level as I was looking at courses since exams have been cancelled, and came across it. It seems quite interesting but I am yet to read up on it thoroughly, will do so shortly after this. For someone who hasn't done GCSE geography so i dont really have background in this, however, I have 5 months to catch up if I decide it interests me. Could someone give me a general overview as i looked at the course outline and was a bit overwhelmed as I said previously havent done geography gcse lol. Whew this was long appreciate anyone that read this! x
can anyone respond? im in limbo
0
reply
Plagioclase
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 months ago
#3
(Original post by un-knownnn)
can anyone respond? im in limbo
Didn't do Geology A-Level but I did do a Geology degree. I'd recommend reading some of Jan Zalasiewicz's books (e.g. The Goldilocks Planet, Planet in a Pebble) or Richard Fortey's Earth: An Intimate History. Those are all well-written popular science books on Geology/Earth Sciences and should give you an insight into whether this is a subject you'd be interested in or not.
0
reply
un-knownnn
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#4
(Original post by Plagioclase)
Didn't do Geology A-Level but I did do a Geology degree. I'd recommend reading some of Jan Zalasiewicz's books (e.g. The Goldilocks Planet, Planet in a Pebble) or Richard Fortey's Earth: An Intimate History. Those are all well-written popular science books on Geology/Earth Sciences and should give you an insight into whether this is a subject you'd be interested in or not.
Thank you so much! i will look into it and definitely have a read. You mentioned that u didn't do the level meaning its not required to do the degree I guess? How are the career prospects and is it competitive to get a job? Thanks
0
reply
bethabbott
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 months ago
#5
(Original post by un-knownnn)
Thank you so much! i will look into it and definitely have a read. You mentioned that u didn't do the level meaning its not required to do the degree I guess? How are the career prospects and is it competitive to get a job? Thanks
Hi to both of you, I did Geography GCSE, A-Level and finished a degree in Geology two years ago. I'm back to try give some advice/help whilst the world is in tatters...

I've got to be honest, geology as a degree was incredibly different to geography as a GCSE and A-Level. Geography (for both GCSE and A-Level) is split into two - human geography and physical geography. Human is social impacts (think megacities, slums, global population etc) and physical covers many things (rivers, coastlines, tectonics which is a major link to geology). Because I studied tectonics in A-Level, that's why I went to do a degree in geology. Geology: plate tectonics (earthquakes/tsunamis etc), hydrocarbons, mineralogy, palaeontology etc. Just to clarify that it is quite a jump in between geography and geology.

I wouldn't say it's a disadvantage that you didn't do GCSE Geography, the way to answer A-Level exam questions are a lot different so it's a good way to start from scratch. For university, you'll look into it later but a lot of universities just require an a-level in a STEM field (so geography would be a geography a-level, for my degree I was fine with just geography).

Career: as a geologist, most people tend to go into engineering which for me, is just looking at soil and rocks and figuring out if things are good to build there... Plenty of jobs about though, not too competitive either. Geography has a bigger range of career prospects I think, as you cover both physical and human geography at university. Jobs include data analysts, renewables sector, even traffic management for councils etc.
0
reply
Plagioclase
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 months ago
#6
(Original post by un-knownnn)
Thank you so much! i will look into it and definitely have a read. You mentioned that u didn't do the level meaning its not required to do the degree I guess? How are the career prospects and is it competitive to get a job? Thanks
The most useful degrees for Geology at university by far are Maths, Chemistry and Physics. Biology, Further Maths, Geography and Geology may also be useful, but you absolutely do not need to take A Level Geology to study it at University. I would reiterate what bethabbott said about Geology being different from Geography - they're entirely different subjects. Geology is very much a physical science.

I'm not the best person to comment on job prospects because I'm doing a PhD and going into research, but based on what I've heard from friends who have gone into actual jobs, it's fine - you could do a lot worse than Geology!
Last edited by Plagioclase; 4 months ago
0
reply
lmck01
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 months ago
#7
Hello, I studied Geography at both GCSE and A level. It's a tremendously interesting subject that gives an insight into the world we all live in. From my perspective and experience the first year (AS) was building on GCSE knowledge, it was easy to catch onto and learn if the subject hadn't been studied before as it started at a fairly simplistic level. This will obviously depend on the way your course is taught. It's such a great subject thats so broad covering both human and physical aspects. As part of the course you will be required to carry out an investigation (NEA) into a chosen subject surrounding geography of your choice. This is great prep for uni etc. Good luck in your studies, reply if there's anything you want to ask!
0
reply
un-knownnn
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#8
(Original post by lmck01)
Hello, I studied Geography at both GCSE and A level. It's a tremendously interesting subject that gives an insight into the world we all live in. From my perspective and experience the first year (AS) was building on GCSE knowledge, it was easy to catch onto and learn if the subject hadn't been studied before as it started at a fairly simplistic level. This will obviously depend on the way your course is taught. It's such a great subject thats so broad covering both human and physical aspects. As part of the course you will be required to carry out an investigation (NEA) into a chosen subject surrounding geography of your choice. This is great prep for uni etc. Good luck in your studies, reply if there's anything you want to ask!
Sorry for the late reply! Could I ask is there a lot of human geography involved as I did geography in years 7 and 8 and I found this particularly interesting. Also, I know geology counts as a science (as in STEM) but I'm unsure on geography as it's regarded as more of a humanity? So if I were to apply for geography level would I qualify for a geology degree or would I actually need a solid science at a-level? Thanks
0
reply
Plagioclase
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 months ago
#9
(Original post by un-knownnn)
Sorry for the late reply! Could I ask is there a lot of human geography involved as I did geography in years 7 and 8 and I found this particularly interesting. Also, I know geology counts as a science (as in STEM) but I'm unsure on geography as it's regarded as more of a humanity? So if I were to apply for geography level would I qualify for a geology degree or would I actually need a solid science at a-level? Thanks
Regarding the last point, many (but not all) universities regard geography A Level as a science, but you will have to check on a per-university basis because they all have different entry requirements. If you want to study geology at university, I would really recommend studying at least two hard sciences out of Maths, Physics and Chemistry though.
Last edited by Plagioclase; 3 months ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling ahead of results day?

Very Confident (3)
4.35%
Confident (9)
13.04%
Indifferent (7)
10.14%
Unsure (15)
21.74%
Worried (35)
50.72%

Watched Threads

View All