WHO hung up upon hearing Taiwan

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El Salvador
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wl4dFRDBWvE

Hong Kong's state media RTHK interviewed an official of the WHO (who once said he would rather be treated in China if he had the coronavirus):

Reporter: Will the WHO reconsider Taiwan's membership?

WHO: *silence*

Reporter: Hello?

WHO: I'm sorry, I can't hear your question, Yvonne.

Reporter: Okay, let me repeat the question.

WHO: No, that's okay. Let's move on to another one then.

Reporter: I'm actually in talking about Taiwan as well, on Taiwan's case.

WHO: *hung up*

Reporter: *called again*

Reporter: I just want to see if you can comment a bit on how Taiwan has done so far in terms of containing the virus.

WHO: Well, we've already talked about China, and you know, when you look across all the different areas of China, they've actually all done quite a good job. So with that, I'd like to thank you very much for inviting us to participate, and good luck as you go forward with the battle in Hong Kong.

---

An apolitical, objective, science-based organization everybody!
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Ragman75
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Ikr its ridiculous how far we have let such an immoral domineering and totalitarian government into our global institutions. Hopefully the one silver lining from the pandemic is that it will open peoples eyes to the fact that China is not another 1st world moral and honest country like france or the Canada, and that they will realise that it is essentially just a richer version of north Korea that a bit more subtle with its atrocities.
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Ascend
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A petition to get rid of China's WHO lapdog Tedros:

https://www.change.org/p/united-nati...rector-general
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Napp
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(Original post by Ascend)
A petition to get rid of China's WHO lapdog Tedros:

https://www.change.org/p/united-nati...rector-general
Their charges against him don't seem to be the most... robust in the world?
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Ascend
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The WHO and China: Dereliction of Duty

The WHO’s weak response to China’s mishandling of the COVID-19 outbreak has laundered China’s image at the expense of the WHO’s credibility. The time is ripe for clear leadership from the WHO based on science not politics.

The WHO Director-General (DG) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has been an outspoken advocate for the Chinese government’s COVID-19 response. On January 28, Tedros met with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing. Following the meeting, Tedros commended China for “setting a new standard for outbreak control” and praised the country’s top leadership for its “openness to sharing information” with the WHO and other countries. Yet in Wuhan, the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak, Chinese officials were busy arresting and punishing citizens for “spreading rumors” about the disease, while online censors controlled the flow of information. Despite growing evidence of China’s mishandling of the outbreak and rising domestic Chinese outrage over the government’s censorship, Tedros remains unmoved. On February 20 at the Munich Security Conference, Tedros doubled down on his praise for China stating that “China has bought the world time.”

In contrast to his effusive praise for China, Tedros has been quick to criticize other countries for their responses to the outbreak. He called upon nations not to limit travel with China and warned against the “recrimination or politicization” of the outbreak. Domestic Chinese news coverage prominently features Tedros’ praise of Xi Jinping and criticism of foreign governments.
China’s influence in the WHO is also evident in the organization’s treatment of Taiwan. Since China acceded to the UN in 1971, it has periodically blocked Taiwan’s WHO membership on the grounds that the democratically governed island is part of China. From 2009 to 2016, China allowed Taiwan to join the WHO’s decision-making body, the World Health Assembly, as an observer under the name Chinese Taipei. After the election of President Tsai Ing-wen in 2016, cross-strait relations chilled causing China to block Taiwan’s future participation.

Taiwan’s exclusion has very real consequences during global health emergencies. First, the WHO is an indispensable source of information for countries’ health departments. Without membership, Taiwan must rely on China’s health department for outbreak information often with delays ranging from several days to weeks. China has been forthcoming with information during the COVID-19 outbreak, but there is no guarantee of future cooperation leaving Taiwan in a precarious situation. Second, the WHO’s inclusion of Taiwan as part of China’s territory overstates the scale of the outbreak on the island leading to unmerited economic and diplomatic consequences. Mainland cases of COVID-19 are now above 70,000 with over 2,500 deaths. Taiwan has only reported 32 confirmed cases to date. However, several countries including Italy, El Salvador, Mongolia, Vietnam, and the Philippines used the WHO’s country classification as justification to restrict travel from Taiwan. While the Philippines and Vietnam eventually reversed their travel bans on Taiwan, the island nation’s continued exclusion from the WHO means that such a mistake is liable to recur.
Dr. Tedros’ inaction stands in stark contrast to the WHO’s actions during the 2003 SARS outbreak in China. Then WHO DG Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland made history by declaring the WHO’s first travel advisory in 55 years which recommended against travel to and from the disease epicenter in southern China. Dr. Brundtland also criticized China for endangering global health by attempting to cover up the outbreak through its usual playbook of arresting whistleblowers and censoring media.

What has changed in the nearly two decades since the SARS epidemic? As always, it is important to follow the money. Since its founding, the WHO has required voluntary budgetary contributions to meet its broad mandate. In recent years, the WHO has grown more reliant upon these funds to address budget deficits. Countries’ assessed contributions have grown by only 3% since 2014. Extrabudgetary voluntary contributions have grown by 18% from $3.9 billion in 2014-15 to nearly $4.7 billion in 2018-19. This dependence on voluntary contributions leaves the WHO highly susceptible to the influence of individual countries or organizations.

For its part, China’s WHO contributions have grown by 52% since 2014 to approximately $86 million. This is largely due to China’s increase in assessed contributions which are based on a country’s economic development and population. However, China has also slightly increased voluntary contributions from $8.7 million in 2014 to approximately $10.2 million in 2019. While this pales in comparison to the United States’ 2018-19 contribution of $893 million, China’s growing contributions come as its influence across the UN is rising just as U.S. leadership is declining. Going forward, China might appear to be a more reliable partner for organizations dependent on members’ financial support like the WHO.

China was also an important ally of Tedros in the WHO’s DG election in 2017. Months before the election, Tedros was invited to speak at Peking University where he called for stronger cooperation between China and the Global South on health issues. China’s support for Tedros paid off immediately. The day after his electoral victory, Tedros confirmed to Chinese state-media that he and the WHO will continue to support the “One China” principle, which recognizes the government in Beijing as the legitimate Chinese government. Three years later, Tedros’ enduring support of China’s response to COVID-19 shows that their early support for him is still paying dividends.

The WHO’s weak response to China’s mishandling of the COVID-19 outbreak has laundered China’s image at the expense of the WHO’s credibility. The rate of infection in China appears to be declining, but the risk of a global pandemic is increasing. The time is ripe for clear leadership from the WHO based on science not politics.
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Napp
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(Original post by Ascend)
The WHO and China: Dereliction of Duty

The WHO’s weak response to China’s mishandling of the COVID-19 outbreak has laundered China’s image at the expense of the WHO’s credibility. The time is ripe for clear leadership from the WHO based on science not politics.
Just as a matter of interest, with brevity in mind, what exactly is he accused of not doing, or cocking up?
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Ascend
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(Original post by Napp)
Just as a matter of interest, with brevity in mind, what exactly is he accused of not doing, or cocking up?
Whitewashed China's mishandling of the outbreak, completely ignoring the fact that they covered it up during the crucial first phase, while also calling on nations not to limit their travel with China.
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fallen_acorns
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(Original post by Ascend)
Whitewashed China's mishandling of the outbreak, completely ignoring the fact that they covered it up during the crucial first phase, while also calling on nations not to limit their travel with China.
There are a few problems with your article..

It says 'follow the money' as justification for why the WHO would lean on China's side.. then promptly points out how China contrubtes less than 10% of what the USA contributes.. if they really were following the money, they would be on trumps side at the moment..

It also compares this to 2003, implying the situations are similar but the response has been different. In reality the situations are different, and the response is different - China in 2003 was refusing to share information and data, not cooperating at all, and generally being a pain for the WHO to deal with. This time around they have shared everything and cooperated fully. They have also reacted within the time frame that is to be expected of a nation who has an outbreak like this.

Also - as far as the Taiwan stuff goes.. that's not exclusive to the WHO, or any evidence that its capitulating.. almost all major international organizations, from the WHO to the UN to the Olympics, don't include or fully recognize Taiwan. Even among nations, only 14 recognize it as a nation, and they are all tiny: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/...a-country.html

Unfortunately there is nothing the WHO can do about Taiwan. China is clear, if you want to work with it, you don't recognize Taiwan as indipendant.. That means every body or nation has to choose.. taiwan or China. The most populous and second richest nation on the planet? Or a nation of 24 million with a GDP of less than a trillion.

The Taiwan situation its a very valid criticism of China, but not of the WHO. they don't really have a choice here
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JerryLin
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According to WHO

China are perfect
Their figures are 100% legit because WHO have verified them by being told by the Chinese communist party that they're legit.
China needs to make more vaccines and medicine its the best place to make them!

Making the world more dependent on China so they'll have us by the balls even more.
Last edited by JerryLin; 9 months ago
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Ascend
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Despite the falsehoods China initially passed on, which played a critical role in delaying global response, the country is now trying to leverage its reputed success story into a stronger position on international health bodies.

How WHO Became China’s Coronavirus Accomplice

Beijing is pushing to become a public health superpower—and quickly found a willing international partner.


While the novel coronavirus is changing the world, China is trying to do the same. Already a serious strategic rival of the United States with considerable international clout, it’s now moving into a new field—health.

After initial denials and cover-ups, China successfully contained the COVID-19 outbreak—but not before it had exported many cases to the rest of the world. Today, despite the falsehoods it initially passed on, which played a critical role in delaying global response, it’s trying to leverage its reputed success story into a stronger position on international health bodies.

Most critically, Beijing succeeded from the start in steering the World Health Organization (WHO), which both receives funding from China and is dependent on the regime of the Communist Party on many levels. Its international experts didn’t get access to the country until Director-General Tedros Adhanom visited President Xi Jinping at the end of January. Before then, WHO was uncritically repeating information from the Chinese authorities, ignoring warnings from Taiwanese doctors—unrepresented in WHO, which is a United Nations body—and reluctant to declare a “public health emergency of international concern,” denying after a meeting Jan. 22 that there was any need to do so.

After the Beijing visit, though, WHO said in a statement that it appreciated “especially the commitment from top leadership, and the transparency they have demonstrated.” Only after the meeting did it declared, on Jan. 30, a public health emergency of international concern. And after China reported only a few new cases each day, WHO declared the coronavirus a pandemic March 11—even though it had spread globally weeks before.

WHO was keen to broadcast Beijing’s message. “In the face of a previously unknown virus, China has rolled out perhaps the most ambitious, agile and aggressive disease containment effort in history,” WHO experts said in their February report on the mission to China. The country had gained “invaluable time for the response” in an “all-of-government and all-of society approach” that has averted or delayed hundreds of thousands of cases, protecting the global community and “creating a stronger first line of defense against international spread.”

China’s “uncompromising and rigorous use of non-pharmaceutical measures” provides vital lessons for the global response, the WHO report said. Beijing’s strategy “demonstrated that containment can be adapted and successfully operationalized in a wide range of settings.” However, while recommending China’s epidemic control policy to the world, WHO neglected the negative externalities—from economic damage to the failure to treat many non-coronavirus patients, psychological woes, and human rights costs.

It’s not surprising that China’s containment strategy was effective, said Richard Neher, virologist at the University of Basel. “The big lockdown, centralized quarantine, and contact tracing for sure accelerated the decline,” Neher said. Lawrence O. Gostin, director of the WHO Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University, points to “major human rights” concerns with the lockdown techniques pioneered in China and now—to a different degree—adopted in many nations. Gostin recommends standard public health measures like testing, treatment, contact tracing, and isolation or quarantine “as scientifically justified.”

While the rising number of cases elsewhere shows that China isn’t alone in failing in the initial stages of an outbreak, the full story of the Chinese loss will probably never be known—and certainly not recognized by WHO or other bodies.

One reason is that official data from China is often highly dubious—which can lead to ill-advised health policies in other countries, since studies based on information from China are the first used to understand COVID-19. Countless cases of people dying at home in Wuhan—some being described in social media posts—will probably never go into the statistics. And while a report by Caixin on the Chinese province of Heilongjiang said that a considerable percentage of asymptomatic cases has not been reported—which amounts to about 50 percent more known infections in China, according to a South China Morning Post report on classified government data—WHO takes numbers reported by Beijing at face value.

“I thought the greatest success of the Chinese party-state was in getting the WHO to focus on the positive sides of China’s responses and ignore the negative sides of the responses,” said Steve Tsang, director of the China Institute at the SOAS University of London. “With the WHO presenting China’s responses in a positive light, the Chinese government is able to make its propaganda campaign to ignore its earlier mistakes appear credible and to ignore the human, societal, and economic costs of its responses.”

Indeed, WHO closes its eyes to such problems. “China reported and isolated ALL individuals with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19,” Christian Lindmeier, a WHO spokesperson, said in mid-March. However, Chinese authorities only in the beginning of April started to make current numbers of asymptomatic cases with lab-confirmed infections public—which also are included in the WHO case definition for COVID-19. “Every country has its own self-reporting processes”, Lindmeier said. WHO epidemiologist Bruce Aylward, who headed the visit, said in an interview that China was not hiding anything. When asked how many people have been put in quarantine, isolation, or residential restriction, Lindmeier referred to numbers from China’s National Health Commission—which are much smaller than the numbers calculated by the New York Times. “WHO works with these data,” he said.

Yet it is unclear whether the WHO experts who traveled to China sufficiently understood the situation on the ground. For example, based on numbers from the South China province of Guangdong, WHO argued that undetected cases are rare. However, a screening program for COVID-19 only included patients seen at fever clinics; most of them probably showed at least a fever. In Germany, most of the people who tested positive did not show a fever. It is easily possible that there has been a substantial number of undetected cases, Neher said, which is the “big unknown” in calculations of the death rate.

WHO also left many questions open about how exactly public engagement was managed in its report. Chinese people have reacted “with courage and conviction,” it says; they have “accepted and adhered to the starkest of containment measures.” While this is probably true for many, others were likely motivated by a statement of the Supreme People’s Court: People carrying the virus who don’t follow quarantine restrictions “face jail terms ranging from three to 10 years if the consequence is not serious,” it says. Otherwise, they could face a life sentence or death.

“The community has largely accepted the prevention and control measures and is fully participating in the management of self-isolation and enhancement of public compliance,” the WHO report says. In China, no measures have been implemented that could not also be used elsewhere, Aylward claimed in an interview. Apparently, the WHO mission didn’t have the chance to speak with people with opposing views. Many Chinese people told him that they all have been attacked together and need to react in a united fashion, Aylward said.

The very uniformity of this narrative should have been a wake-up call, said Mareike Ohlberg from the Berlin-based Mercator Institute for China Studies. Indeed, the whole trip of both foreign and national experts seems to have been organized along Potemkin-esque lines for a team where most of its international members lacked linguistic skills and familiarity with China. “We really didn’t have much interaction until after all the site visits,” said Clifford Lane, a deputy director at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of the delegation. It was his first trip to China, he told Science. “I was really surprised with how modern the cities were.”

Ohlberg said the statements of the WHO have clearly been heavily influenced by the Chinese Communist Party. She says she was surprised that, from the start, many experts uncritically repeated information from Beijing and “preached confidence in the WHO and the Chinese government.” The WHO report rightly emphasized the heroic commitment of the population of Wuhan. “But it’s important that the WHO does not degrade itself to an instrument of the Chinese government—which does not want to make transparent how the population suffered,” she said.

Osman Dar, global health expert at Public Health England and the Royal Institute of International Affairs, said that China is no different from other countries that seek to exert influence. WHO had evolved out of colonial-era international sanitary conferences convened by the European powers and expansionist U.S. policy, he said. Since WHO was controlled and largely influenced by the national interests of Western powers before, in the past 20 years, countries like China “have started to have more influence in the global health space.”

Beijing’s say is growing not only at WHO, but also in the health policies of more and more countries. This also is an important area in China’s Belt and Road Initiative and its activities in African countries. It may be doubted whether Beijing always acts in the best interests of its partners. “Chinese health aid allocation is poorly related to direct health needs of African countries,” French researchers last year concluded.

The same is true for the current outbreak, which is politically important, said Tankred Stöbe, former president of MSF (Doctors Without Borders) Germany and a former member of the International Board of MSF International. In February, he traveled to Southeast Asia (SEA) as a COVID-19 emergency coordinator for Doctors Without Borders. Countries like Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand “cannot escape the influence of China,” he said. “I know about meetings where representatives of China have said: Dear friends in Southeast Asia, we’re interested in continuing good cooperation. It is clear for us that you must let your borders open—otherwise we would have to rethink our friendship.” The countries “cannot refuse,” Stöbe said. Countries like Cambodia and Pakistan kept accepting flights from China during the outbreak.

For political reasons, “Vietnam can’t close its border with China,” physician Rafi Kot told the Israeli newspaper Haaretz. He founded several medical centers in the country. “The Chinese have put immense pressure on everyone: the Koreans, Vietnam, everyone,” he told the newspaper. “Asian countries cannot act as they want vis-a-vis China because it’s the big power in the neighborhood.” While Cambodia closed its borders to several Western countries in mid-March, it started military drills together with hundreds of Chinese soldiers, which concluded this Monday.

China itself temporarily closed its border to Laos almost completely during its COVID-19 outbreak, Stöbe said, forcing the north of the country into a critical economic crisis. And last weekend Beijing closed its borders to almost all foreigners—a move that it had criticized other countries for during the outbreak within its own borders.

“The fact that the Chinese government can persuade some SEA countries to keep their borders open to Chinese visitors, whereas it locks down a province with a population larger than most SEA countries shows how influential it is in the region,” said Tsang of the China Institute.

Brian Eyler, Southeast Asia program director of The Stimson Center, said he was surprised to see China follow through with sending its foreign minister and an entourage of high-level officials to a Lancang-Mekong Cooperation ministerial meeting in Vientiane on Feb. 20. That was “a day in which the rest of China was on lockdown and cases of new viruses were increasing,” Eyler said. The U.S. State Department had “prudently postponed” a similar high-level meeting on the same day in Bangkok. “So at the end of February, it seems China would rather project a business-as-usual stance to its backyard, rather than to err on the side of caution to safeguard those who attended.”

From a human rights perspective, “authoritarianism is bad for your health,” said Sophie Richardson, China director at Human Rights Watch. “We may never have a clear picture how the virus spread out and who died and why and who is denied access to treatments.”

The world is now living with the consequences of the Chinese government’s censorship, Richardson said. “Not only do we have this problem now, we might have it again in the future.”
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Ascend)
Despite the falsehoods China initially passed on, which played a critical role in delaying global response, the country is now trying to leverage its reputed success story into a stronger position on international health bodies.

How WHO Became China’s Coronavirus Accomplice
Tedros is a dodgy ****er.

In this article he claims "strike a fine balance between protecting health, minimising disruption and respecting human rights". But not once has he criticised China for their appalling abuse of human rights.
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Greywolf.
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(Original post by Napp)
Their charges against him don't seem to be the most... robust in the world?
It’s almost as if they are politically bias?
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(Original post by Ascend)
Despite the falsehoods China initially passed on, which played a critical role in delaying global response, the country is now trying to leverage its reputed success story into a stronger position on international health bodies.

How WHO Became China’s Coronavirus Accomplice
You would probably be interested in this article.

https://unherd.com/2020/04/how-the-w...iled-us-again/
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Ascend
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
Tedros is a dodgy ****er.

In this article he claims "strike a fine balance between protecting health, minimising disruption and respecting human rights". But not once has he criticised China for their appalling abuse of human rights.
This isn't the first time he has sucked up to tyrants who helped get him the WHO gig. Before daddy Xi, there was Mugabe:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-41702662
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(Original post by Ascend)
This isn't the first time he has sucked up to tyrants who helped get him the WHO gig. Before daddy Xi, there was Mugabe:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-41702662
Or the time he worked as the Health Minister for the dictator of Ethiopia.
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Just my opinion
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The WHO are as bent as the UN.
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NonIndigenous
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China supposedly re-diverted medical supplies in mass back to its mainland from the rest of the world, many months before the coronavirus had been recognised by the rest of the world for the threat it is.

They did this through numerous Chinese corporations with offices and warehouses in other countries.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
The WHO are as bent as the UN.
They are the same thing.
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Ascend
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
The WHO are as bent as the UN.
(Original post by DiddyDec)
They are the same thing.
They are all just a reflection of international cooperation vs. power struggles. Western powers dropped the ball on his one and should be held to higher standards (because we rightly set it up so high).
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Ascend
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Tedros is now accusing Taiwan of racist attacks. Taiwan responds:

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/04/08/who-...ve-a-damn.html

“Three months ago, this attack came from Taiwan. We need to be honest. I will be straight today. From Taiwan,” he said. “And Taiwan, the Foreign Ministry also, they know the campaign. They didn’t disassociate themselves. They even started criticizing me in the middle of all that insult and slur, but I didn’t care.”

Taiwan, which is not a member of the United Nations, the governing body of the WHO, responded to Tedros’ comments, calling them “baseless” and demanding an apology. Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen added on Facebook that “Taiwan has always opposed all forms of discrimination.” She also invited Tedros to visit Taiwan.

“Dr. Tedros’s unwarranted charges, made without any attempt at verification, are contrary to the facts and have caused serious damage to the government and people of Taiwan,” Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a statement. “Such slander is irresponsible, and the government of Taiwan demands that the Director-General immediately correct his trumped-up claims, issue a clarification, and apologize to the people of Taiwan.”
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