The importance of a history a level for an English literature degree

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emilyr2019
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I am in year 12 at the moment , and I study English Literature, Geography and Psychology. I am certain that I want to go on to do an English degree, hopefully at somewhere such as Durham (my targets are AAA).
I have been worrying about how important a History A level is to getting into a top uni to study English Lit. I chose not to do history as, while I did get a 9 at GCSE, as I prefer to study historical contexts from an English lit point of entry.
So, my question is, does not doing history a level make a difference to my chances of getting top uni offers for an English degree?
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PetitePanda
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If it's not required then you'll be fine. You have English Lit, which is the only required subject, so you'll be fine
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harrysbar
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(Original post by emilyr2019)
I am in year 12 at the moment , and I study English Literature, Geography and Psychology. I am certain that I want to go on to do an English degree, hopefully at somewhere such as Durham (my targets are AAA).
I have been worrying about how important a History A level is to getting into a top uni to study English Lit. I chose not to do history as, while I did get a 9 at GCSE, I preferred to study history form an English lit point of entry.
So, my question is, does not doing history a level make a difference to my chances of getting top uni offers for an English degree?
No and I don't even know why anyone would think you should have History A level to study English at uni :confused: Every uni clearly states their subject requirements on their websites, if they have any
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学生の父
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History A-level teaches the skills of historical investigation, and these are not seen as necessary as entry level skills for an English Literature degree.

What English admissions tutors will want to see is evidence that you are able to demonstrate skills of literary appreciation, analysis and interpretation. Getting a good grade at English Literature A-level (or English Language and Literature A-level) is an established way of showing that you have those skills.

Yes, the literary theorist may well want to place literature in its historical context, but you don't need History A-level in order to step onto that path. No university will ask you for History, either.

In fact, the skill sets you are building in your Geography and Psychology classes are just as useful for understanding literature. History doesn't trump those two subjects.
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username2393237
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This is quite a strange thread.
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Deggs_14
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(Original post by YaliaV)
This is quite a strange thread.
No it’s a personally reasonable question to ask. What makes you think that?
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5hyl33n
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(Original post by Deggs_14)
No it’s a personally reasonable question to ask. What makes you think that?
The question doesn’t make sense. Why would you need History A-Level for an English degree? 🤔
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emilyr2019
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I’m asking more of ‘the important ‘ of a history A level. I’m just curious as to how having/not having a history A level to accompany the English lit A level alters the chances of selection for the top universities to study English lit.The reason I’m concerned is when looking on Durham, York, Oxford ...... and many more top uni websites, they say that history is ‘useful’. I known that is not to say they’d rather take a person who has history over someone who doesn’t , but I’m not so sure on the overall impact of this on selection onto the course...
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Deggs_14
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(Original post by 5hyl33n)
The question doesn’t make sense. Why would you need History A-Level for an English degree? 🤔
Lots of people worry about the need to learn the context behind the literature they study I would think.
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emilyr2019
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(Original post by harrysbar)
No and I don't even know why anyone would think you should have History A level to study English at uni :confused: Every uni clearly states their subject requirements on their websites, if they have any
Thanks!
I just have an impression that most English lit degree students have done history A level too. My teachers seem to think it doesn’t matter, but I was planning on doing a history oriented EPQ to pad out my application (showing I can look at text from a historical point of entry, while not putting myself through the A level of history which I know I would very much dislike hahaha).
I absolutely love history, just not the a level stuff, so this EPQ was going to be great, however the virus has stopped all that in its tracks!! :eek:
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emilyr2019
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(Original post by 学生の父)
History A-level teaches the skills of historical investigation, and these are not seen as necessary as entry level skills for an English Literature degree.

What English admissions tutors will want to see is evidence that you are able to demonstrate skills of literary appreciation, analysis and interpretation. Getting a good grade at English Literature A-level (or English Language and Literature A-level) is an established way of showing that you have those skills.

Yes, the literary theorist may well want to place literature in its historical context, but you don't need History A-level in order to step onto that path. No university will ask you for History, either.

In fact, the skill sets you are building in your Geography and Psychology classes are just as useful for understanding literature. History doesn't trump those two subjects.
Thanks!
I am a bit of an over thinker sometimes hahaha! Well now I have even more time to overthink due to the isolation ...

I’m just concerned that someone with the same grades as me would be picked over me just because they have a history A level ....
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by emilyr2019)
Thanks!
I am a bit of an over thinker sometimes hahaha! Well now I have even more time to overthink due to the isolation ...

I’m just concerned that someone with the same grades as me would be picked over me just because they have a history A level ....s
Some leading universities provide a list of preferred subjects and provide you have 2 of them you will be fine. English Lit Psychology and Geography are on the lists
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harrysbar
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(Original post by emilyr2019)
Thanks!
I just have an impression that most English lit degree students have done history A level too. My teachers seem to think it doesn’t matter, but I was planning on doing a history oriented EPQ to pad out my application (showing I can look at text from a historical point of entry, while not putting myself through the A level of history which I know I would very much dislike hahaha).
I absolutely love history, just not the a level stuff, so this EPQ was going to be great, however the virus has stopped all that in its tracks!! :eek:
There may be some sort of correlation between people doing English Lit & History A levels (I did both of them myself ) but I think that's just because they are similar subjects so people who like reading and are good at essays will often choose to do both. It doesn't mean you need both, you will be fine.
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
Some leading universities provide a list of preferred subjects and provide you have 2 of them you will be fine. English Lit Psychology and Geography are on the lists
Can I just add that most universities dont fill their spaces so as long as you meet the grades and have a decent PS and reference you should be fine, This doesnt apply to places like Oxbridge and Durham.
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