educator991
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Hi, All. I want to pursue a postgrad teaching qualification such as an online Masters in Education (2 years) or an online PGCE (1 year). I’d like to find out which one would be more demanding of my time whilst teaching full time. I'm interested in teaching in an international school, and I know that both are accepted. It's just a question of budget. I am funding this myself, and the PGCE is x4 the price of the Masters.Thoughts?
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bwilliams
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Masters in Education is not a teaching qualification. You will look at the theory of education in depth and focus on one particular aspect of education and undertake a level 7 dissertation in this area of independent research.

PGCE is a teaching qualification that is focussed more on teaching practice and the actual professional skills of teaching. The course is usually based on two assignments and is worth 60 CATs. A Masters is 180 CATs, usually. This is because the majority of your PGCE you will be working in school developing your pedagogy.

If you would like to be a teacher, I suggest the PGCE. You can then take the Masters at a later date and, generally, you can count your 60 level 7 CATs from your PGCE and use them to complete your Masters. So, you would only need to complete 120 CATs for your Masters, saving you money and time!

I would stress to you - the MA is not a teaching qualification and will not teach you how to teach. It is aimed at those who want to develop their practice in other ways. You will make the most of the Masters research dissertation if you are already working as a teacher at that point. It would make a lot more sense to go through the PGCE.

Edit: PGCE is 4x the price because you will get an internationally recognised teaching qualification. For example, you could not practice as a qualified teacher in the UK with a Masters in Education, without a BEd or PGCE that gives you QTS (Qualified Teacher Status).

Hope that helps and feel free to ask me any further questions.
Last edited by bwilliams; 7 months ago
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Get into Teaching
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I think it depends on your rationale for wishing to do the course. If you wish to only teach in an international context then either qualification might suffice, however, if you would like to teach in the UK at some point in the future then gaining your qualified teacher status (QTS) would be necessary. Thinking over the long term will help you to establish which course might be best for you. The Get into Teaching Programme is a useful support that provides you with a personal advisor who can help you to decide on possible teaching routes and teacher training providers. Take a look at our website and what it offers. If you decide it might be useful then you can sign up and receive an advisor. Each teacher training advisor has extensive teaching and school experience and, thus can help support you to move forward with your teaching ambitions.
Hope this helps
Meg
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educator991
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Thank you for your responses.
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