DeItaReality
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Is a level history a good a level to study and do you need to learn alot of stuff and alot of memorisation. How is the content and how is your experience to study it? I want to know all this stuff as I'm planning to pick it at a level and want to see how people are doing in this a level.
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username5232128
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I have to admit, I am biased as I love history, but if you enjoy the subject then it's absolutely an A-level you should pick.
Find out which exam board the school/college you're applying for uses and find out what topics they'll cover in the course as different schools and exam boards offer different topics. It will definitely cover a huge range of history as that's the point! And if there's a particular piece of history that you're interested in that you won't be able to study, just do it in your own time using the skills you learn in the course and it will look great for a Uni application (it's good to get wider reading in where you can).
As for memorisation, obviously with dates, names and the like, you're going to need to put in the work to remember them but it's honestly not as bad as I expected. I struggle to remember equations and theories in physics and psychology, but in history I don't find it too bad.

Hopefully this helps!
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Lucy-01
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There is a lot of content, I did it in Year 12 but as I was doing 4 subjects I dropped it as I’d figured out what I wanted to do at uni by then and it wasn’t really relevant for that, so to carry on such a content-heavy subject seemed like a bad idea for me. But as long as you’re organised and work hard, and enjoy it, you should be fine.
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wastedcuriosity
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Hi! I did A-Level history and loved it. To do well in it, I think you have to enjoy the subject or revising will be especially hard if you're not interested in the content.

I did AQA History and studied the Tudors and the Russian Revolution. With AQA you do a breadth study (over a long period of time) and then a depth study (which is a shorter amount of time but much more detail) and then 3000-word coursework. It's a content-heavy subject and revising it is time-consuming, but what I found helped a lot was timelines, essay plans, and mind-maps. I did quite a lot of extra reading, as the Tudors was something I was really interested in, which really helped me to remember names and dates, which there are a LOT of to remember haha.
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Sinnoh
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Make sure you're interested in the periods you're studying - if you're not, try to make yourself interested lol.
I did OCR, I had civil rights in the USA as my thematic study (40% of the whole grade), and then the late Tudors and Russian Revolution for my depth studies. I didn't really enjoy learning the Tudor part, maybe because it all felt a bit distant and detached but I really got into the other two topics. And I'm still reading about Russian history now.

I tried as far as possible to avoid having to just rote-learn info because I hate doing that, so history was in hindsight a risky choice maybe but I loved it.
The reason you learn info is to back up your arguments when writing an essay - you are not tested on recall alone. Matter of fact you could memorise a whole textbook and still not do well, because it's about more than that.

My methods for learning without rote: talking about it with your friends who do it, planning essays, discussing potential questions and how you'd answer them. I always felt I retained information better once I'd used it in an essay.

Oh and don't faff about with coursework. Pick a topic, stick to it and don't procrastinate.
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DeItaReality
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Make sure you're interested in the periods you're studying - if you're not, try to make yourself interested lol.
I did OCR, I had civil rights in the USA as my thematic study (40% of the whole grade), and then the late Tudors and Russian Revolution for my depth studies. I didn't really enjoy learning the Tudor part, maybe because it all felt a bit distant and detached but I really got into the other two topics. And I'm still reading about Russian history now.

I tried as far as possible to avoid having to just rote-learn info because I hate doing that, so history was in hindsight a risky choice maybe but I loved it.
The reason you learn info is to back up your arguments when writing an essay - you are not tested on recall alone. Matter of fact you could memorise a whole textbook and still not do well, because it's about more than that.

My methods for learning without rote: talking about it with your friends who do it, planning essays, discussing potential questions and how you'd answer them. I always felt I retained information better once I'd used it in an essay.

Oh and don't faff about with coursework. Pick a topic, stick to it and don't procrastinate.
The topics that I'm going to study is the later tudors, Democracy and Dictatorship in Germany 1919-63 and Russia and its Rulers 1855-1964. I don't know anything about these topics and I want to know if people enjoyed it as i may enjoy it or not but I will try and read about it to see if it interests me.
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redmeercat
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History was my least favourite of my 3 A levels, but that's coming from someone who always prefers English lit and languages etc. Although I still enjoyed it, it was the most stressful due to the need to learn and understand so much content - and the specific topics your school does also make a lot of difference. Having said that, I found that reading the 2nd year textbook over the summer made y13 history a lot more enjoyable than y12 as I understood what was going on in relation to all the other events. Also, if you try to make/find a basic timetline of events prior to study, it can help to place more complex ideas in relation to the general topic. Wider reading is also crucial, but I found academic articles such as on JSTOR easier to use than books!

Hope it goes well!
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by DeItaReality)
The topics that I'm going to study is the later tudors, Democracy and Dictatorship in Germany 1919-63 and Russia and its Rulers 1855-1964. I don't know anything about these topics and I want to know if people enjoyed it as i may enjoy it or not but I will try and read about it to see if it interests me.
ah so that's OCR too then. Russia ought to be an interesting topic given its importance, and with the thematic study you don't actually need to get into very fine detail like you do with the two depth studies (Tudors and Germany).
Late Tudors can get a bit confusing. The way I think of it is there's quite a few 'characters' you end up having to learn about in order to make sense of what happens. There'll be a fair bit of source analysis for that too, and it may take a while to perfect a formula for answering the questions.
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smjs2003
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I’m currently taking History A level and I love it! If you do choose history, just make sure to keep up to date with revision notes, even if that’s taking 5 minutes to write a flash card on what you studied each day.
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