CaraSophiaD
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I heard that doing music A-level is really hard, im only practicing for my grade 6 piano exam and i got a 7 for my mocks. I want to become a primary school teacher so im not sure if i should risk doing music or do another subject like sociology instead?
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username4755594
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Well, I do Music A-level (Edexcel) and I like it (I want to go into the music profession when I'm older, and the music A level that I'm doing helps me to advance through the academic, musical stages)! The Edexcel course requires a grade 7 in the instrument that you're studying by year 13, however you gain bonus marks if your piece is more difficult (i.e. grade 8). I entered the beginning of year 12 still in practise of my grade 5 singing pieces, so after I did my exam, I skipped grades 6 and 7, and leapt onto 8. You could skip grade 7 piano (if you feel ready) and plunge into grade 8, however this would only ensure you gained bonus points.

Excluding the performance aspect of the music A level course, which in Edexcel is worth 30%, you have to do appraising (40%) and composing (30%). For the appraising, you have to analyse approximately 50 set works (the teachers only count the composers). This may sound like a ton, but in whatever subject you go into for A levels, the quantity of information will increase by a lot to compensate for the fact that you are now only doing 3 or 4 subjects. These set works are split up into the categories of vocal music; instrumental music; film music; popular music and jazz; fusions; and new directions. As well as learning all of the musical information from those, you need to create a free composition and one that follows a brief (e.g. Bach choral).

The Edexcel A level music course feels to me - as a student who did the GCSE one as well - like an extended, broadened version of the GCSE course. All of the core elements of the GCSE course (like composing, analysing and performing) are still there; however, for performing you have to play a longer piece (of minimum 8 mins), for composing your pieces have to be longer too (minimum 6 minutes), and the essay appraising questions require further depth (context, adjectives, wider listening). But if you can get your head around all of this, and discover easy revision methods, I'm sure you'll enjoy A level music.

Also, you're debating above about whether to do an essay-based subject such as sociology. Well, what I'd recommend is to not (unless you are the master of A level essays) make all three of your A levels essay-based. Taking Music as an A level is like taking a 50/50 essay-based subject, with some freedom for creativity as well.

I hope this has helped you on deciding what to choose for A levels.
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CaraSophiaD
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(Original post by Mobitela)
Well, I do Music A-level (Edexcel) and I like it (I want to go into the music profession when I'm older, and the music A level that I'm doing helps me to advance through the academic, musical stages)! The Edexcel course requires a grade 7 in the instrument that you're studying by year 13, however you gain bonus marks if your piece is more difficult (i.e. grade 8). I entered the beginning of year 12 still in practise of my grade 5 singing pieces, so after I did my exam, I skipped grades 6 and 7, and leapt onto 8. You could skip grade 7 piano (if you feel ready) and plunge into grade 8, however this would only ensure you gained bonus points.

Excluding the performance aspect of the music A level course, which in Edexcel is worth 30%, you have to do appraising (40%) and composing (30%). For the appraising, you have to analyse approximately 50 set works (the teachers only count the composers). This may sound like a ton, but in whatever subject you go into for A levels, the quantity of information will increase by a lot to compensate for the fact that you are now only doing 3 or 4 subjects. These set works are split up into the categories of vocal music; instrumental music; film music; popular music and jazz; fusions; and new directions. As well as learning all of the musical information from those, you need to create a free composition and one that follows a brief (e.g. Bach choral).

The Edexcel A level music course feels to me - as a student who did the GCSE one as well - like an extended, broadened version of the GCSE course. All of the core elements of the GCSE course (like composing, analysing and performing) are still there; however, for performing you have to play a longer piece (of minimum 8 mins), for composing your pieces have to be longer too (minimum 6 minutes), and the essay appraising questions require further depth (context, adjectives, wider listening). But if you can get your head around all of this, and discover easy revision methods, I'm sure you'll enjoy A level music.

Also, you're debating above about whether to do an essay-based subject such as sociology. Well, what I'd recommend is to not (unless you are the master of A level essays) make all three of your A levels essay-based. Taking Music as an A level is like taking a 50/50 essay-based subject, with some freedom for creativity as well.

I hope this has helped you on deciding what to choose for A levels.
Thank youu🙏🏼 😩i was really determined to do music A-level but im not so confident as our GCSEs we’re cancelled, im not sure where i am with music because my teacher’s gradings were very biased. I would still like to do Music A Level, so is there any advice you could give me to help me prepare?
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username4755594
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(Original post by CaraSophiaD)
Thank youu🙏🏼 😩i was really determined to do music A-level but im not so confident as our GCSEs we’re cancelled, im not sure where i am with music because my teacher’s gradings were very biased. I would still like to do Music A Level, so is there any advice you could give me to help me prepare?
I'd recommend getting to know the set works (all fifty of them, if you have the time and energy!) through listening to them intently, and possibly through pre-reading them. Here's the link to Edexcel A level course website with all of them on it:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...cification.pdf

Plus, if you're ultra-bored you could create the wider listenings for the set works now so that you don't have to do it during years 12 and 13. By that, I mean either create presentations or tables linking each set work to a different piece of music from the same genre, and say how that piece's musical characteristics are similar (e.g. wider listening of Danny Elfman's: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory for the set work of Batman Returns, you could see how musical elements like the dynamics or tonality are similar).

When it comes to performing, just practise, practise, PRACTISE!

I'm not sure I can help that much with the compositions, because that's not my forte (ha! ha!). Plus, I don't know which composition brief your sixth form follows. If it is the bach chorales (the one that my school does), listen to a lot of them; you could even read this websites guide on how harmonize a bach chorale melody:

http://van****music.weebly.com/uploa...h_chorales.pdf

I hope this helps you fill in your time indoors.
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CaraSophiaD
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(Original post by Mobitela)
I'd recommend getting to know the set works (all fifty of them, if you have the time and energy!) through listening to them intently, and possibly through pre-reading them. Here's the link to Edexcel A level course website with all of them on it:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...cification.pdf

Plus, if you're ultra-bored you could create the wider listenings for the set works now so that you don't have to do it during years 12 and 13. By that, I mean either create presentations or tables linking each set work to a different piece of music from the same genre, and say how that piece's musical characteristics are similar (e.g. wider listening of Danny Elfman's: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory for the set work of Batman Returns, you could see how musical elements like the dynamics or tonality are similar).

When it comes to performing, just practise, practise, PRACTISE!

I'm not sure I can help that much with the compositions, because that's not my forte (ha! ha!). Plus, I don't know which composition brief your sixth form follows. If it is the bach chorales (the one that my school does), listen to a lot of them; you could even read this websites guide on how harmonize a bach chorale melody:

http://van****music.weebly.com/uploa...h_chorales.pdf

I hope this helps you fill in your time indoors.
Thank you so much🤗🙏🏼
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username4755594
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(Original post by CaraSophiaD)
Thank you so much🤗🙏🏼
You're welcome
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