beanskul
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
I want to take psychology in college this September, but I'm struggling to decide whether i want to take A-level psychology or Applied psychology as I don't fully understand the difference. Any help?
0
reply
username5228528
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by beanskul)
I want to take psychology in college this September, but I'm struggling to decide whether i want to take A-level psychology or Applied psychology as I don't fully understand the difference. Any help?
Hi, I found this information from
https://www.psychologyschoolguide.ne...ed-psychology/
It has nothing to do with A level psychology, but shows the main differences between the two. Hope this helps!

The main difference between research psychology and applied psychology is that the main function of a research psychologist is to conduct experiments, psychological research studies, and observational studies, while applied psychologists applies psychological theories, principles, concepts, techniques, strategies, approaches, and methods from their branches of psychology (i.e. sports, family, health, social, school, etc.) to their practices. In other words, an applied psychologist uses the psychological resources available to him or her to treat clients and patients experiencing psychological disorders, mental illnesses, adjustment disorders, and emotional distress. Every practicing psychologist uses applied psychology.

Also, research psychologist typically conduct their experiments in research laboratories with participants, while applied psychologist treat clients in clinics, mental health hospitals, social service agencies, schools, etc. They also teach at universities and colleges. Truth-be-told, research psychologists also use applied psychology. How? Well, research psychologists have to have something to base their theories, hypotheses, results, and experiments on. The foundation comes from the applied principles in their branches of psychology. Furthremore, research psychologists tend to make more, annually, then applied psychology, but it largely depends on the branch of psychology, the demand for services, and the location.
Last edited by username5228528; 1 year ago
0
reply
beanskul
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Anonymous856)
Hi, I found this information from
https://www.psychologyschoolguide.ne...ed-psychology/
It has nothing to do with A level psychology, but shows the main differences between the two. Hope this helps!

The main difference between research psychology and applied psychology is that the main function of a research psychologist is to conduct experiments, psychological research studies, and observational studies, while applied psychologists applies psychological theories, principles, concepts, techniques, strategies, approaches, and methods from their branches of psychology (i.e. sports, family, health, social, school, etc.) to their practices. In other words, an applied psychologist uses the psychological resources available to him or her to treat clients and patients experiencing psychological disorders, mental illnesses, adjustment disorders, and emotional distress. Every practicing psychologist uses applied psychology.

Also, research psychologist typically conduct their experiments in research laboratories with participants, while applied psychologist treat clients in clinics, mental health hospitals, social service agencies, schools, etc. They also teach at universities and colleges. Truth-be-told, research psychologists also use applied psychology. How? Well, research psychologists have to have something to base their theories, hypotheses, results, and experiments on. The foundation comes from the applied principles in their branches of psychology. Furthremore, research psychologists tend to make more, annually, then applied psychology, but it largely depends on the branch of psychology, the demand for services, and the location.
Thanks for your help!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling now you've started university?

I'm loving it! (46)
13.37%
I'm enjoying it but I'm still settling in (93)
27.03%
I'm a bit unsure (60)
17.44%
I'm finding things difficult (115)
33.43%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (30)
8.72%

Watched Threads

View All