The new RAF Initial Officer Training Course - April 2020

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RAF_Adam
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Hi

If anyone is in the application process for an Officer role in the RAF then the information and link below will be of interest to you.


(M)IOT and Officer Staff Training

The Modular Initial Officer Training Course (MIOTC) has been designed to provide commissioning officers with the skills and knowledge required to set the foundations for a successful career in the RAF. These foundations will form a solid platform for continued professional development and thus compliment and coordinate with both the RAF Division of the Joint Service Command and Staff College at Shrivenham and the Air and Space Warfare School at RAF College Cranwell.

Why Modularised IOTC

MIOTC consists of four, 6-week modules which are delivered without inter-module breaks (unless the course runs over the summer or winter fortnight block leave periods), the 24 week course will run up to 8 times per year for up to 90 students per intake. The modular construct paves the way for the future ambition to create multiple start points for students based on their previous qualifications and experience. Whilst each course will have multiple start points it will always have a single end point. In this way, the course maintains its cohort nature and allows for a suitable graduation at week 24 for everyone.

How will it work?

Commissioning Serving Airman (SA) will join the course no earlier than week seven, missing out the first module completely and reducing the time in training to 18 weeks. As the MERCURY Project continues, it is envisaged that further reductions for SA may be achieved by recognising their previous experience and learning gained at each rank level. In contrast, all Direct Entrants (DE) and International Defence Training students will undertake the full 24-week course. Specialist Officer Initial Training students will be fully integrated into the first 6-week module alongside their DE colleagues but then, in recognition of their previous specialist training, they will complete an accelerated training programme over just six-weeks in order to graduate with the next graduating Sqn. The Reserves Officers Initial Training (ROIT) syllabus has been updated to reflect the main course objectives. The ROIT course will continue to be a mix of weekend and residential training, but every opportunity will be taken to integrate the Reserves Trg with the Main and Specialist Courses. Finally, Commissioning WOs will continue to attend the Commissioning Warrant Officer’s Course which lasts 2 weeks, however this will be timed to take advantage of main course activity and the course will graduate with a main Sqn.

The Modules:

The Modules will be delivered in order and whilst students will not be formally assessed until Module 4, they will be continually assessed against the RAFs core principles of ’RISE’, “Respect, Integrity, Service, Excellence”;

Military Induction Module (MIM) – Weeks 1 to 6:

The first 6-week module contains all the basic generic skills and knowledge required to induct a civilian into military service; it closely mirrors the Basic Recruit Training Course undertaken by all non-commissioned entrants into the RAF at RAF Halton. Students who attend this module can expect to study subjects such as; foot drill, military discipline, weapon training, skill at arms, basic field-craft, first aid and use of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) equipment, physical training and education, and perhaps most significantly military ethos and our core values (RISE). These activities will support their transition into the military.

Developmental Module 1 (Dev 1) – Weeks 7 to 12:

In the Dev1 module the emphasis is on Relational, Individual and Collaborative learning, this is summed up as “Knowing and leading yourself in order to lead others”. Cadets will develop their physical and mental resilience and focus on authentic leadership principles, behaviours and capacities. The physical education and training programme will continue to focus on conditioning, nutrition and health. The principles of leadership in command will be introduced, along with working in teams. Supporting this programme will be a trip to the Robson Resilience Academy Centre at Crickhowell; using an AT setting to develop leadership fundamentals. This module culminates in a week-long exercise where the cadets will live in an austere environment and will practice leading small teams in a deployed military scenario. Alongside the leadership programme cadets will begin learning about the use of Air and Space Power. Initially this will be delivered and facilitated by the College’s academic partner, Portsmouth Business School and will focus on historical, theoretical and doctrinal studies. Later in the course this knowledge will be brought to life using a realistic Air Command and Control (AirC2) context.

Developmental Module 2 (Dev 2) – Weeks 13 to 18:

During this module the emphasis shifts to ‘Explore Leadership – Practice and Develop’, focussing on Command and Control (C2) and in-depth elements of RAF leadership. Mid-way through this module there will be mini-C2 simulated exercise where students will learn to apply the theory in a more practical scenario. In the second half of this module, the course splits and completes a ‘carousel’ of 3 disciplines; AirC2 in the Air and Space environment, Line Management Responsibilities and finally, Care and Welfare in Leadership. The AirC2 element will be taught off site at the RAFs Air and Space Warfare Centre. The aim of this week, is to bring to life the theory they’ve learned so far, and help them understand how they will be tested in the final module. The Care and Welfare Elements will be delivered by our Padres in their training centre. Here, students will learn how to support staff and protect their health and wellbeing. The Line Management weeks will be delivered at OACTU and concentrate on staff appraisals, discipline, military law, interview techniques, service writing and verbal skills. Students will be expected to maintain their physical fitness as the programme facilitates a shift from directed Physical Training towards more self-directed exercise. Our Physical Training Instructors will provide ongoing education to students so that they have the confidence to maintain their own physical fitness and encourage and promote the same from their future subordinates. Maintaining fitness levels is a key aspect of the course and Cadets will be expected to undertake their own fitness training.

Consolidation Module (Consol) – Weeks 19 to 24:

The final 6-week module is further divided into the Consolidation Phase and the Transition & Graduation (T&G) Phase. The Consolidation phase is designed to give cadets the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the course material through a mixture of practical and written activities. Over a 4-week period the cadets will undertake an Air C2 based exercise, a deployment to the Robson Resilience Centre at Grantown on Spey, a week-long management simulated exercise and finally, a week of academic assessment in Air & Space Power and General Service Knowledge for officers.
The outcome of these activities, when combined with the RISEs assessment scores acquired throughout the course, will give OACTU staff a complete picture of each cadet’s suitability and enable them to recommend either graduation, re-training or removal from training. Successful cadets will then undertake the 2-week T&G Phase which will deliver a myriad of just-in-time interventions which aim to support newly commissioned officers in their next appointment. It will offer practical advice on how to get the most from the opportunities that the Service will offer throughout their careers. After a final brush up of drill and ceremonial skills, the graduation parade marks a fitting culmination of 24 weeks of learner centred development. Most importantly the Graduation Parade offers the families and friends of the graduating officers the opportunity to share in their success.
The graduation ball takes place that evening and is considered by many newly graduated Officers to be one of the most symbolic elements of the day as, in addition to the festivities, you will gather in the College Hall rotunda just before midnight to hear your name read out from the graduation scroll along with your commissioned rank, confirming your transformation to a Commissioned Officer in the RAF.

You can see the MIOTC Schedule breakdown here

Adam
RAF Recruitment
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Drewski
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Just for the record - because we know we'll be asked - April in the title solely refers to when this update is from, not when it's rolling out, yes?

Is it still expected to begin in August?

And there better still be a champagne Tuesday...
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RAF_Adam
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(Original post by Drewski)
Just for the record - because we know we'll be asked - April in the title solely refers to when this update is from, not when it's rolling out, yes?

Is it still expected to begin in August?

And there better still be a champagne Tuesday...
Drew

Yes, correct. It's just to highlight when I've added the post! August is still the proposed start date. But obviously that's open to review in the current situation.

Adam
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KeiranP
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Thanks for the update RAF_Adam.
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AlphaTango
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Evening Adam,

Anything further on this?
As the MERCURY Project continues, it is envisaged that further reductions for SA may be achieved by recognising their previous experience and learning gained at each rank level.

I’ve two serving SNCOs considering applying but both have recently deployed and with the course being less than 6 months won’t be entitled to SFA at Cranwell so they want to know how long they are going to be away for before taking the leap family wise.
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RAF_Adam
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(Original post by AlphaTango)
Evening Adam,

Anything further on this?
As the MERCURY Project continues, it is envisaged that further reductions for SA may be achieved by recognising their previous experience and learning gained at each rank level.

I’ve two serving SNCOs considering applying but both have recently deployed and with the course being less than 6 months won’t be entitled to SFA at Cranwell so they want to know how long they are going to be away for before taking the leap family wise.
Hi AT

At present all SA will join at week seven. There may be elements that as an SNCO they'll have already done in the second term, but it gives them more time to gel into the flight.

However, as it's a modular course now there is potential scope for this to change, it is continually being looked at. But at present, they'll need to expect 18 weeks.

I'll see if I can find out if there's any different options either now or coming through.

Kind regards
Adam
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Drewski
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(Original post by RAF_Adam)
Hi AT

At present all SA will join at week seven. There may be elements that as an SNCO they'll have already done in the second term, but it gives them more time to gel into the flight.

However, as it's a modular course now there is potential scope for this to change, it is continually being looked at. But at present, they'll need to expect 18 weeks.

I'll see if I can find out if there's any different options either now or coming through.

Kind regards
Adam
I had originally heard that there was an idea that serving JNCOs would be joining in term 2 while SNCOs would be joining in term 3.
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username421348
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(Original post by Drewski)
I had originally heard that there was an idea that serving JNCOs would be joining in term 2 while SNCOs would be joining in term 3.
Excellent news. People have been asking for this for ages.
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Drewski
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(Original post by unruly1986)
Excellent news. People have been asking for this for ages.
Yes, but the new news from Adam suggests that's not the case (yet).
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AlphaTango
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(Original post by RAF_Adam)
Hi AT

At present all SA will join at week seven. There may be elements that as an SNCO they'll have already done in the second term, but it gives them more time to gel into the flight.

However, as it's a modular course now there is potential scope for this to change, it is continually being looked at. But at present, they'll need to expect 18 weeks.

I'll see if I can find out if there's any different options either now or coming through.

Kind regards
Adam
Adam,

Understood I’ll pass on the latest. I think they’ll wait out with a mind to Drewski’s post above ^.
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username421348
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(Original post by Drewski)
Yes, but the new news from Adam suggests that's not the case (yet).
This is the first I’ve heard regarding the ‘modularisation’ of IOT. Generally speaking it’s a great move for SA applicants. It can be difficult for quality ORs to make the jump due to the training burden (if you’ve been in more than a few years, you shouldn’t need to have to learn to march, do first aid, strip a rifle, etc.) and the domestic upheaval this can bring. I’m knocking on the door of FS so this definitely appeals.
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EconWarrior
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BLUF: MIOT, good in theory, how will it work in practice?

I fully understand the reasons why IOT has been modularised and the benefits of the change are obvious.

However, there is a significant catch - and I think this is something that has been perhaps overlooked in the higher echelons of Whittle hall - the DS can lean on the more experienced ORs during those first two weeks to ensure that they are “in stretch”. In other words, the ORs aren’t left in a comfort zone, they are expected to mentor the DEs on everything from bulling shoes to ironing beds and stripping rifles. They are given early experience of herding cats and set an initial benchmark for the DEs to aspire. This is a real time, tangible, exercise in leadership that is now going to be lost.

As is tradition, this help is repaid in full during the academic elements of term two by those straight out of uni.

Thoughts?
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Drewski
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(Original post by EconWarrior)
BLUF: MIOT, good in theory, how will it work in practice?

I fully understand the reasons why IOT has been modularised and the benefits of the change are obvious.

However, there is a significant catch - and I think this is something that has been perhaps overlooked in the higher echelons of Whittle hall - the DS can lean on the more experienced ORs during those first two weeks to ensure that they are “in stretch”. In other words, the ORs aren’t left in a comfort zone, they are expected to mentor the DEs on everything from bulling shoes to ironing beds and stripping rifles. They are given early experience of herding cats and set an initial benchmark for the DEs to aspire. This is a real time, tangible, exercise in leadership that is now going to be lost.

As is tradition, this help is repaid in full during the academic elements of term two by those straight out of uni.

Thoughts?
The numbers of ORs on courses was never consistent, so you could never guarantee that there would be a spread of them across all the individual groups.

I remember during my IOT, despite being one of the last surge courses, that my Regiment syndicate during those initial 5 weeks didn't have an OR on it, so we were relying on the Reg Sgt and each other.

Given the inconsistency of the numbers and the fact that the DS can't rely on there being enough OR to help out like that, it makes sense.

Plus, in recent years, the UAS system has changed markedly to concentrate more on force protection and preparing people for service, so more DEs are prepared than they used to be.
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Ikaruss
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Good to see the CWO course remains a 2 week sabbatical where they can finally learn to eat with a knife and fork, and allow the good tailors of Sleaford to try and perform miracles with their posh No1s.

I was obviously in the wrong place at the wrong time, and my Mum was always disappointed I never made starred rank 😵

But seriously, there are some really excellent products coming out of the ranks and through the Rotunda at College Hall, and long may it continue.
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EconWarrior
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(Original post by Ikaruss)
Good to see the CWO course remains a 2 week sabbatical where they can finally learn to eat with a knife and fork, and allow the good tailors of Sleaford to try and perform miracles with their posh No1s.

I was obviously in the wrong place at the wrong time, and my Mum was always disappointed I never made starred rank 😵

But seriously, there are some really excellent products coming out of the ranks and through the Rotunda at College Hall, and long may it continue.
Here here
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beanstalkgirl_24
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RAF_Adam Thanks for the updated info about IOT. Is there a breakdown as yet as to what the Ex's are going to be called/entail on the new (M)IOT course?
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BRH1234
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(Original post by RAF_Adam)
Hi

If anyone is in the application process for an Officer role in the RAF then the information and link below will be of interest to you.


(M)IOT and Officer Staff Training

The Modular Initial Officer Training Course (MIOTC) has been designed to provide commissioning officers with the skills and knowledge required to set the foundations for a successful career in the RAF. These foundations will form a solid platform for continued professional development and thus compliment and coordinate with both the RAF Division of the Joint Service Command and Staff College at Shrivenham and the Air and Space Warfare School at RAF College Cranwell.

Why Modularised IOTC

MIOTC consists of four, 6-week modules which are delivered without inter-module breaks (unless the course runs over the summer or winter fortnight block leave periods), the 24 week course will run up to 8 times per year for up to 90 students per intake. The modular construct paves the way for the future ambition to create multiple start points for students based on their previous qualifications and experience. Whilst each course will have multiple start points it will always have a single end point. In this way, the course maintains its cohort nature and allows for a suitable graduation at week 24 for everyone.

How will it work?

Commissioning Serving Airman (SA) will join the course no earlier than week seven, missing out the first module completely and reducing the time in training to 18 weeks. As the MERCURY Project continues, it is envisaged that further reductions for SA may be achieved by recognising their previous experience and learning gained at each rank level. In contrast, all Direct Entrants (DE) and International Defence Training students will undertake the full 24-week course. Specialist Officer Initial Training students will be fully integrated into the first 6-week module alongside their DE colleagues but then, in recognition of their previous specialist training, they will complete an accelerated training programme over just six-weeks in order to graduate with the next graduating Sqn. The Reserves Officers Initial Training (ROIT) syllabus has been updated to reflect the main course objectives. The ROIT course will continue to be a mix of weekend and residential training, but every opportunity will be taken to integrate the Reserves Trg with the Main and Specialist Courses. Finally, Commissioning WOs will continue to attend the Commissioning Warrant Officer’s Course which lasts 2 weeks, however this will be timed to take advantage of main course activity and the course will graduate with a main Sqn.

The Modules:

The Modules will be delivered in order and whilst students will not be formally assessed until Module 4, they will be continually assessed against the RAFs core principles of ’RISE’, “Respect, Integrity, Service, Excellence”;

Military Induction Module (MIM) – Weeks 1 to 6:

The first 6-week module contains all the basic generic skills and knowledge required to induct a civilian into military service; it closely mirrors the Basic Recruit Training Course undertaken by all non-commissioned entrants into the RAF at RAF Halton. Students who attend this module can expect to study subjects such as; foot drill, military discipline, weapon training, skill at arms, basic field-craft, first aid and use of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) equipment, physical training and education, and perhaps most significantly military ethos and our core values (RISE). These activities will support their transition into the military.

Developmental Module 1 (Dev 1) – Weeks 7 to 12:

In the Dev1 module the emphasis is on Relational, Individual and Collaborative learning, this is summed up as “Knowing and leading yourself in order to lead others”. Cadets will develop their physical and mental resilience and focus on authentic leadership principles, behaviours and capacities. The physical education and training programme will continue to focus on conditioning, nutrition and health. The principles of leadership in command will be introduced, along with working in teams. Supporting this programme will be a trip to the Robson Resilience Academy Centre at Crickhowell; using an AT setting to develop leadership fundamentals. This module culminates in a week-long exercise where the cadets will live in an austere environment and will practice leading small teams in a deployed military scenario. Alongside the leadership programme cadets will begin learning about the use of Air and Space Power. Initially this will be delivered and facilitated by the College’s academic partner, Portsmouth Business School and will focus on historical, theoretical and doctrinal studies. Later in the course this knowledge will be brought to life using a realistic Air Command and Control (AirC2) context.

Developmental Module 2 (Dev 2) – Weeks 13 to 18:

During this module the emphasis shifts to ‘Explore Leadership – Practice and Develop’, focussing on Command and Control (C2) and in-depth elements of RAF leadership. Mid-way through this module there will be mini-C2 simulated exercise where students will learn to apply the theory in a more practical scenario. In the second half of this module, the course splits and completes a ‘carousel’ of 3 disciplines; AirC2 in the Air and Space environment, Line Management Responsibilities and finally, Care and Welfare in Leadership. The AirC2 element will be taught off site at the RAFs Air and Space Warfare Centre. The aim of this week, is to bring to life the theory they’ve learned so far, and help them understand how they will be tested in the final module. The Care and Welfare Elements will be delivered by our Padres in their training centre. Here, students will learn how to support staff and protect their health and wellbeing. The Line Management weeks will be delivered at OACTU and concentrate on staff appraisals, discipline, military law, interview techniques, service writing and verbal skills. Students will be expected to maintain their physical fitness as the programme facilitates a shift from directed Physical Training towards more self-directed exercise. Our Physical Training Instructors will provide ongoing education to students so that they have the confidence to maintain their own physical fitness and encourage and promote the same from their future subordinates. Maintaining fitness levels is a key aspect of the course and Cadets will be expected to undertake their own fitness training.

Consolidation Module (Consol) – Weeks 19 to 24:

The final 6-week module is further divided into the Consolidation Phase and the Transition & Graduation (T&G) Phase. The Consolidation phase is designed to give cadets the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the course material through a mixture of practical and written activities. Over a 4-week period the cadets will undertake an Air C2 based exercise, a deployment to the Robson Resilience Centre at Grantown on Spey, a week-long management simulated exercise and finally, a week of academic assessment in Air & Space Power and General Service Knowledge for officers.
The outcome of these activities, when combined with the RISEs assessment scores acquired throughout the course, will give OACTU staff a complete picture of each cadet’s suitability and enable them to recommend either graduation, re-training or removal from training. Successful cadets will then undertake the 2-week T&G Phase which will deliver a myriad of just-in-time interventions which aim to support newly commissioned officers in their next appointment. It will offer practical advice on how to get the most from the opportunities that the Service will offer throughout their careers. After a final brush up of drill and ceremonial skills, the graduation parade marks a fitting culmination of 24 weeks of learner centred development. Most importantly the Graduation Parade offers the families and friends of the graduating officers the opportunity to share in their success.
The graduation ball takes place that evening and is considered by many newly graduated Officers to be one of the most symbolic elements of the day as, in addition to the festivities, you will gather in the College Hall rotunda just before midnight to hear your name read out from the graduation scroll along with your commissioned rank, confirming your transformation to a Commissioned Officer in the RAF.

You can see the MIOTC Schedule breakdown here

Adam
RAF Recruitment
Hi Adam,

My daughter is interested to apply in the near future but we have had different people telling us different things because she’s epileptic and has been since she was six. Does having epilepsy stop her from applying? She’s quite interested in the nursing or medic role in the RAF, is it possible for her to be in the RAF?
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Drewski
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(Original post by BRH1234)
Hi Adam,

My daughter is interested to apply in the near future but we have had different people telling us different things because she’s epileptic and has been since she was six. Does having epilepsy stop her from applying? She’s quite interested in the nursing or medic role in the RAF, is it possible for her to be in the RAF?
Adam, and any other RAF Recruiter you talk to, will just tell you to apply and let the medics at selection decide.


There's an old document that states any fit within the last 10 years or epilepsy with more than one fit after the age of 6 is enough to be permanently unfit, this document is no longer in use, but it's probably a reasonable guide to what medics will still be saying.
And I know from my own experience that if you have a condition that requires medication on a regular basis that that's enough to deem you unfit as well. And that's even if you're already serving as was my case.
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RAF_Adam
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(Original post by beanstalkgirl_24)
RAF_Adam Thanks for the updated info about IOT. Is there a breakdown as yet as to what the Ex's are going to be called/entail on the new (M)IOT course?
Hi

There's the link at the bottom of the information in the original post, that has the breakdown of the new course. There's no 'element names' currently, although that will probably be given to you once you start as the course is still being tweaked before it starts in August.

Kind regards
Adam
RAF Recruitment
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beanstalkgirl_24
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(Original post by RAF_Adam)
Hi

There's the link at the bottom of the information in the original post, that has the breakdown of the new course. There's no 'element names' currently, although that will probably be given to you once you start as the course is still being tweaked before it starts in August.

Kind regards
Adam
RAF Recruitment
Many thanks Adam. I'll wait to hear (though I'm a bit of a way off of IOT yet...at the AFCO stage!).
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