Student nurses redeployed to expand the nursing workforce due to COVID-19

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Charlotte's Web
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The NMC have announced that as part of measures to expand the nursing workforce, student nurses will now be spending more time in clinical areas to provide support.

The biggest change we will see is that all students across the UK who are in their last 6 months of training, will be given the option to change to a full-time employment model. They will retain student status but will not be supernumerary and will be paid at a Band 4 salary in Scotland and Ireland (other countries still to confirm pay). The hours worked will count towards those needed for NMC registration.


This also impacts other student nurses - key changes are:
  • If you are a first year student nurse, your placements will be paused and you will spend up to 100% of your time in theoretical training. You may choose to volunteer or work in a clinical setting in your spare time but these hours will not count towards your NMC registration.
  • All other student nurses will be asked to change to a format of 80% placement and 20% theory, as opposed to the usual 50:50 split.
  • Students in the final 6 months of their degree have three options - either the employment model as described above, taking a leave of absence to work full time as a HCA (or equivalent), or continuing their studies as usual (to the extent the university can facilitate this).


These changes are to be in place for the duration of the emergency and therefore may affect the September 2020 intake of student nurses if they are due to attend placement prior to the end of the emergency period.


Useful resources:
NMC emergency standards for education - https://www.nmc.org.uk/globalassets/...-education.pdf

RCN Press release - https://www.rcn.org.uk/news-and-even...50320-covid-19



How do you feel about these changes? Do you have questions about the new employment model?

Are you due to start your nursing degree in 2020? Feel free to share any worries/concerns.
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Skksd
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Thank for sharing. I am due to start in sept and first placement will be nxt March. If we can’t do placements would that mean the time to do this will be added on, as in will the degree then take longer to complete ?
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by Skksd)
Thank for sharing. I am due to start in sept and first placement will be nxt March. If we can’t do placements would that mean the time to do this will be added on, as in will the degree then take longer to complete ?
The good thing about your situation is that your placement isn't till quite late compared to some other universities so hopefully restrictions would be lifted by then. If they aren't then (assuming the guidance hasn't changed between now and then) you'd do 100% theory. This may mean you'd do more placement in years 2 and 3 to make up for it. It's unlikely the universities would extend the degree unless they absolutely had to.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Charlotte's Web)
The NMC have announced that as part of measures to expand the nursing workforce, student nurses will now be spending more time in clinical areas to provide support.

The biggest change we will see is that all students across the UK who are in their last 6 months of training, will be given the option to change to a full-time employment model. They will retain student status but will not be supernumerary and will be paid at a Band 4 salary in Scotland and Ireland (other countries still to confirm pay). The hours worked will count towards those needed for NMC registration.


This also impacts other student nurses - key changes are:
  • If you are a first year student nurse, your placements will be paused and you will spend up to 100% of your time in theoretical training. You may choose to volunteer or work in a clinical setting in your spare time but these hours will not count towards your NMC registration.
  • All other student nurses will be asked to change to a format of 80% placement and 20% theory, as opposed to the usual 50:50 split.
  • Students in the final 6 months of their degree have three options - either the employment model as described above, taking a leave of absence to work full time as a HCA (or equivalent), or continuing their studies as usual (to the extent the university can facilitate this).


These changes are to be in place for the duration of the emergency and therefore may affect the September 2020 intake of student nurses if they are due to attend placement prior to the end of the emergency period.


Useful resources:
NMC emergency standards for education - https://www.nmc.org.uk/globalassets/...-education.pdf

RCN Press release - https://www.rcn.org.uk/news-and-even...50320-covid-19



How do you feel about these changes? Do you have questions about the new employment model?

Are you due to start your nursing degree in 2020? Feel free to share any worries/concerns.
Not just student nurses. I am an oncology nurse and have been deployed to intensive care. For me it isn't so bad as I used to be one but for my colleagues it is terrifying
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Not just student nurses. I am an oncology nurse and have been deployed to intensive care. For me it isn't so bad as I used to be one but for my colleagues it is terrifying
Oh absolutely. I only made this thread to focus on the student nurses as we don't have many registered nurses around at the moment unfortunately and the different routes for the students is a little bit confusing.

That's really lucky - but still a big change for you. I imagine it must be so hard for nurses with no experience in that sort of environment, it's just so specialised. Having nervous/stressed staff isn't good for patients either. Have they been given some sort of intensive training?
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Midwifery1902
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I’ve opted out for health reasons. However, I think that losing my supernumerary status would have been frightening as does this make me legally responsible for the patients I care for? Whereas before you were working on someone else’s pin? I feel like it wasn’t made clear enough for a lot of people which is why they’ve opted out. Also there’s a reason why these courses are 3 years long. I haven’t done my management placement yet either so it’s quite a lot to take on.
Also I think it will make a good argument that they should reintroduce the student bursary although my cohort (2017-2020) won’t be getting any benefits🙃
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paub
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how does this effect there degrees.are they expected to do all the theory and dissertation whilst working full time. obviously the nhs needs the workers but in the future will this effect the students. will they be awarded the same degree . and the first years years are they really getting theory or just told to read.
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