Chubby_Panda
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Any media and communication students out there? That can give me an insight on the course? What careers are they personally wanting to do? And why you chose the course?
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transnerd
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(Original post by Chubby_Panda)
Any media and communication students out there? That can give me an insight on the course? What careers are they personally wanting to do? And why you chose the course?
Yes hello, it's nice to be seen!

I didn't choose it to get into a career, more, I wanted to understand the changing role of media in our everyday lives (I got depressed by people sharing things like social media is making us worse or less social etc, large media producers are controlling our minds etc.) I studied at Sussex which takes a critical approach, this means you don't learn how the industry works, or how to make media (unless you take media production electives which you can), but instead, the implications of the media, identifying dominant discourses, how certain groups are represented, that news, for example, can never be "objective", analysing things as "texts", think adverts, news article, a TV episode, reality TV show, a commercial image.
There is also a strong cultural studies strand which looks at the study of everyday life and resistance to dominant narratives through our own interpretations of media, for example, (this also includes non-media "texts" how the things we buy shape our identities).

I'm planning to do an MA in Cultural Studies and would like to be a researcher or stay in academia after that. I was also looking at going into the civil service, in other words, not a media-related path. What the course has afforded me above all is a critical perspective on things, strong analysis skills, concise writing, effective reading, summarising, and a really up-to-date understanding of new and changing technologies and channels of media. Skills which are useful and I apply everywhere, even in my job at Asda (!)

Media studies is often looked down upon, but the field kind of embraces that and we're proud of the studying what other disciplines might consider "unimportant". It means you can study whatever really interests you; there is no pretence here. Whether that's reality TV or a McDonald's advert, the study of media and culture is so relevant as it touches/forms/constructs how we understand the world.

Feel free to ask me any questions.
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Chubby_Panda
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(Original post by transnerd)
Yes hello, it's nice to be seen!

I didn't choose it to get into a career, more, I wanted to understand the changing role of media in our everyday lives (I got depressed by people sharing things like social media is making us worse or less social etc, large media producers are controlling our minds etc.) I studied at Sussex which takes a critical approach, this means you don't learn how the industry works, or how to make media (unless you take media production electives which you can), but instead, the implications of the media, identifying dominant discourses, how certain groups are represented, that news, for example, can never be "objective", analysing things as "texts", think adverts, news article, a TV episode, reality TV show, a commercial image.
There is also a strong cultural studies strand which looks at the study of everyday life and resistance to dominant narratives through our own interpretations of media, for example, (this also includes non-media "texts" how the things we buy shape our identities).

I'm planning to do an MA in Cultural Studies and would like to be a researcher or stay in academia after that. I was also looking at going into the civil service, in other words, not a media-related path. What the course has afforded me above all is a critical perspective on things, strong analysis skills, concise writing, effective reading, summarising, and a really up-to-date understanding of new and changing technologies and channels of media. Skills which are useful and I apply everywhere, even in my job at Asda (!)

Media studies is often looked down upon, but the field kind of embraces that and we're proud of the studying what other disciplines might consider "unimportant". It means you can study whatever really interests you; there is no pretence here. Whether that's reality TV or a McDonald's advert, the study of media and culture is so relevant as it touches/forms/constructs how we understand the world.

Feel free to ask me any questions.
Thank you so much for sharing, I've been doing research on media and communications, its something that I spontaneously looked into. I'm a person who studied within the health care field and social care field. I just wanted to break away from that for now.

You said you studied at Sussex? Did you do a sandwich year?
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hope22.
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(Original post by transnerd)
Yes hello, it's nice to be seen!

I didn't choose it to get into a career, more, I wanted to understand the changing role of media in our everyday lives (I got depressed by people sharing things like social media is making us worse or less social etc, large media producers are controlling our minds etc.) I studied at Sussex which takes a critical approach, this means you don't learn how the industry works, or how to make media (unless you take media production electives which you can), but instead, the implications of the media, identifying dominant discourses, how certain groups are represented, that news, for example, can never be "objective", analysing things as "texts", think adverts, news article, a TV episode, reality TV show, a commercial image.
There is also a strong cultural studies strand which looks at the study of everyday life and resistance to dominant narratives through our own interpretations of media, for example, (this also includes non-media "texts" how the things we buy shape our identities).

I'm planning to do an MA in Cultural Studies and would like to be a researcher or stay in academia after that. I was also looking at going into the civil service, in other words, not a media-related path. What the course has afforded me above all is a critical perspective on things, strong analysis skills, concise writing, effective reading, summarising, and a really up-to-date understanding of new and changing technologies and channels of media. Skills which are useful and I apply everywhere, even in my job at Asda (!)

Media studies is often looked down upon, but the field kind of embraces that and we're proud of the studying what other disciplines might consider "unimportant". It means you can study whatever really interests you; there is no pretence here. Whether that's reality TV or a McDonald's advert, the study of media and culture is so relevant as it touches/forms/constructs how we understand the world.

Feel free to ask me any questions.
Hey!!! Your story is so interesting! I have an offer from Sussex and I'm thinking of firming it... I see you look to focus on the academia side of media, would you say the practical options are hard to get into in terms of numbers? Because while I am interested in theory I want to get a varied hands-on experience.
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transnerd
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(Original post by Chubby_Panda)
Thank you so much for sharing, I've been doing research on media and communications, its something that I spontaneously looked into. I'm a person who studied within the health care field and social care field. I just wanted to break away from that for now.

You said you studied at Sussex? Did you do a sandwich year?
I did study at Sussex yes! I did not do a Sandwich year as I didn't study Media Production (I don't think its an option for theory subjects - I might be wrong). If you want to get into the production of media and not be bogged down by not enough "industry" related study then probs do production. I would say as long as you have a genuine interest in the way the world functions you will do well at media and comms. You'll probably find that you already have transferable skills and values, for example, if you are interested in the wellbeing of others, you could study how different groups of people use different media forms to construct their identities/ sense of wellbeing, for example (just not in a "scientific" way). Plus media studies, in general, comes from a place of believing there is a way to change the world and make it a better place so long as we remain critical.

Fell free to ask Q's about Sussex if you're looking into that!
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transnerd
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(Original post by hope22.)
Hey!!! Your story is so interesting! I have an offer from Sussex and I'm thinking of firming it... I see you look to focus on the academia side of media, would you say the practical options are hard to get into in terms of numbers? Because while I am interested in theory I want to get a varied hands-on experience.
I'm glad you found it useful! The practical options do fill up very quickly, how it works it the selection open at either 9am or 8am for everyone and you have to select and confirm the modules to secure your place. It's like a grab for places. But so long as you're up at the time, don't forget and have already decided exactly what you want to do, then you should get it. I got into everything I wanted to just by doing that. Take a practical module in first year coz they're worth fewer credits (and thus its less of a risk, and a lighter workload) and you can see if you like it/ can handle the workload. Don't take documentary unless you're prepared to lug camera equipment around for filming on weekends and evenings and can work with other people who will determine a good chunk of your grade.
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