Studysloath
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I have an offer for Common Law at Glasgow and I wanted to find out a little bit more about studying an English Law degree in Scotland.

I was wondering if it limits your opportunities in any way in comparison to studying in the likes of Exeter which I also got an offer for. I want to go to Glasgow as I wanted to keep doors open and study abroad and to also keep a door open for me to be able to work abroad. I was really impressed by Glasgow’s rankings for law and also by the student satisfaction. I have offers for Dundee, Exeter and Queens but I thought Glasgow would open the most opportunities plus as it is now 3rd in the UK I was overwhelmed being given an offer!!! (But is that for the Scots law or a mix of both common and Scots??) I also am aware that most of the law school is Scots law students so does that feel weird like as if you would be better studying in England with more English law students being in your year?

I wanted to know if it limits your opportunities in any way in getting into top firms in England as although it is English Law it is over in Scotland. And would love to hear from a student who is/has studied Common Law at Glasgow to get to know what it is like!

As the open day was cancelled I didn’t get the opportunity to speak to any students and would love to know what their experience is like studying common Law in Scotland. Would appreciate some info!
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lawcalling
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Although Glasgow may be seen as slightly more reputable, it's also worth asking is that reputation worth an extra year of study? (4yr course at Glasgow vs 3yrs at the likes of Exeter). It is also worth considering that if you're English you'll be paying an extra year of fees - which is an extra £9250 compared to other unis (plus accommodation etc). Definitely two factors worth putting in the balance.

In terms of employment, I know a number of students from Edinburgh at top UK firms and they're taking a Scots Law degree, so I don't see why a Common Law degree from Glasgow would disadvantage you!
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Studysloath
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Thank you! I’m Northern Irish btw so it will be the same for fees either way and I don’t mind another year even if that is more costly if it means I am going to a uni that would give me an extra boost and that will give me the best advantage to get the best teaching and results. Thank you, that is reassuring.
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lawcalling
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(Original post by Studysloath)
Thank you! I’m Northern Irish btw so it will be the same for fees either way and I don’t mind another year even if that is more costly if it means I am going to a uni that would give me an extra boost and that will give me the best advantage to get the best teaching and results. Thank you, that is reassuring.
No worries! In terms of employment, I'd look at these (with a pinch of salt): https://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/wh...d-universities and https://www.legalcheek.com/2016/04/r...ge-2/#comments. I wouldn't say Glasgow would give you a boost in terms of results/subsequent prospects over Exeter (however I'm not sure on the teaching side) - just something to take into consideration if you're going to pay 10k more for it and spend an extra year on studies (plus your LPC following that). It is also worth considering that in that extra year you could be paralegalling/working and earning etc which could be a valuable addition to your CV.
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Studysloath
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(Original post by lawcalling)
No worries! In terms of employment, I'd look at these (with a pinch of salt): https://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/wh...d-universities and https://www.legalcheek.com/2016/04/r...ge-2/#comments. I wouldn't say Glasgow would give you a boost in terms of results/subsequent prospects over Exeter (however I'm not sure on the teaching side) - just something to take into consideration if you're going to pay 10k more for it and spend an extra year on studies (plus your LPC following that). It is also worth considering that in that extra year you could be paralegalling/working and earning etc which could be a valuable addition to your CV.
I am planning to study abroad and get some experience which I think will also stand out on a CV. Do you know why the Glasgow degree is a year longer?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Studysloath)
I am planning to study abroad and get some experience which I think will also stand out on a CV. Do you know why the Glasgow degree is a year longer?
Standard degrees in Scotland are 4 years compared to 3 in England.

Beware of taking league tables too seriously, although they can be a useful guide. Take a look at J Papis thread on Common Questions & Misconceptions, particularly point 9 about why Scottish unis are not as selective for law as their entry tariffs suggest

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6247090
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lawcalling
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(Original post by Studysloath)
I am planning to study abroad and get some experience which I think will also stand out on a CV. Do you know why the Glasgow degree is a year longer?
I'm not 100% sure, Dundee is 3 years by the look of things? It also seems like all other degrees at Glasgow are 4yrs too.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by lawcalling)
I'm not 100% sure, Dundee is 3 years by the look of things? It also seems like all other degrees at Glasgow are 4yrs too.
The only 3 year law degree at Dundee is the English Law one.

The Scots Law and Dual Qualifying degrees are the typical 4 years
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