Saudi use of death penalty soares, despite prince pledge

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Andrew97
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https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/s...edge-q3dntvg8l


Since the Times is behind a paywall, I’ll bullet point stuff here.

  • Since King Salman came to the throne, 800 have been executed in 5 years. Roughly double of before. The “milestone” was passed last week with the beheading of a man for murder.
  • Analysis by reprieve, a London based anti death penalty group, has concluded most executions are of a political nature. With 37 executed on a single day last year for partaking in, or inciting, demonstrations.
  • The total of 185 last year was an annual high, despite promises its use would be reviewed.
  • MBS, Mohammed Bin Salman, thr crown prince is in charge of much of the day to day running of thr Kingsom and has introduced reforms such as allowing women to drive. Despite this in January 2016 Saudi Arabia allowed the first mass execution for years. Most of those executed were from Al-Qeuda but some were from minority groups.
  • According to Reprieve since 23rd April last year 37 of those executed were minors and 82 were executed for drugs offences, 57 for murder.
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Napp
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I really do wish supposedly respectable broadsheets such as the Times would stop trying to give MBS a respectable veneer. The man is an odious tyrant and his 'reforms' are little more than a smoke screen (and a **** poor one at that). As nicely evidenced by his; butchering journalists, executing dissenters, abducting foreign officials, carpet bombing civilians et cetera et cetera et cetera
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username4969948
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In the eyes of our Conservative government, the Saudi regime is the right kind of brutal dictatorship. They chase Western patronage, buy our arms, sell us oil, offer our honest businessmen the right bribes, etc. So criticism of their human rights abuses, support of terrorism, denial of basic freedoms, etc. is always going to be muted.
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Napp
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If proven, yet more evidence that the countries leadership and its security services are not but a bunch of savages. Savagry that, as Kitten in Boots noted, is politely ignored in many circles unfortunately.
Saudi forces kill man who refused to give up property: Activists

Abdul Rahim al-Hwaiti was allegedly shot dead after he refused to give up his property for a Red Sea mega-project.
A Saudi citizen who refused government orders to give up his home to make way for a new mega-project was killed by security forces, according to Saudi activists.

The man, who identified himself as Abdul Rahim Ahmad Mahmoud al-Hwaiti, said in a video posted online he was from the town of al-Khraybah in the northwest Red Sea region. He and other residents were being pressured by the government to give up their properties and accept financial compensation, he said.

Al-Hwaiti said in one video uploaded on YouTube that "anyone who refuses to leave the area would be arrested by government agents". He called the government's move "forced displacement".

"This is my home," he said, adding he would not move elsewhere in Saudi Arabia because he considers his tribal area his "own homeland".

Al-Hwaiti said residents of the area do not want to be uprooted but are now living in fear because of what security forces might do to them.

"Nine people from my area have been arrested so far and I am sure I will be next - or even killed," he said in one video. "I am sure if they kill me they would put weapons around my body and claim I was a terrorist."

According to Saudi activists, al-Hwaiti was shot dead after recording his last video documenting security forces storming his property.

The Saudi government has not commented on the alleged killing. Calls to two government officials seeking comment rang unanswered on Wednesday.

Al-Hwaiti hails from the powerful al-Huwaitat tribe who are based in three countries: Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and the Sinai in Egypt. The al-Huwaitat have resided in the region for more than 800 years, predating the Saudi state itself by many centuries over.

'Uproot our people'
London-based Aliaa Abutayah is a Saudi political activist who opposes the Saudi leadership and hails from the city of Tabuk in the northwestern region.


COUNTING THE COST: Why was Saudi Arabia's oil minister fired? (25:41)
She told Al Jazeera she received several videos - including one that shows the shooting of al-Hwaiti by Saudi security forces - from a witness and posted them on her Twitter account.

"The Saudi government has no right to uproot our people from their lands and homes for their projects that don't benefit the region or the residents," said Abutayah.

Abutayah alleged she has received death threats from Saudi agents because of her opposition to the government.

The Red Sea development, known as NEOM, is a mega-project envisioned by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) in Tabuk province.

NEOM, which will be close to the size of Belgium, is to become a hub for "tourism, innovation and technology". It is part of MBS's Vision 2030 to transform Saudi Arabia and diversify its oil-based economy.

According to NEOM's website, the project will include "towns and cities, ports and enterprise zones, research centres, sports and entertainment venues, and tourist destinations".

"It will be the home and workplace for more than a million citizens from around the world," it said.

Ancestral home
Hamzah al-Kinani, a Washington, DC-based Saudi academic and dissident who worked previously for a senior Saudi royal, told Al Jazeera tribes in the region refuse to leave because they consider it their ancestral homeland and the area is part of their "honour and heritage".

"Those who don't accept the government compensation to leave their homes, they will either be imprisoned or killed - as in the case of Abdul Rahim al-Hwaiti," he said

Agreeing with al-Kanani's comments, Washington, DC-based Saudi activist Ali al-Ahmad said he is not surprised that Saudi security forces allegedly killed al-Hwaiti.

Al-Ahmad, founder and director of the Institute of Gulf Affairs, said the Saudi government has carried out similar operations in other areas of the country, particularly in its eastern province.

"They have destroyed many other private properties and historical places like al-Musawara [a residential area in Awamiyah town in eastern Qatif province in 2017] in order to develop mega-projects that eventually enrich a certain few people in the kingdom - but not the public," he said.


https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...114842469.html
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Iñigo de Loyola
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I'm not sure how to feel about this - it depends what they were sentenced to death for IMHO. If they were killed for homosexuality that ought to be condemned, but I've got no problems with hanging terrorists, murderers or rapists.
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Napp
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(Original post by LiberOfLondon)
I'm not sure how to feel about this - it depends what they were sentenced to death for IMHO. If they were killed for homosexuality that ought to be condemned, but I've got no problems with hanging terrorists, murderers or rapists.
The problem is the Saudis have a rather unfortunate tendency to just label anyone they dislike a terrorist and chop their head off. Especially if they happen to be Shiite.
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BlueIndigoViolet
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(Original post by Napp)
The problem is the Saudis have a rather unfortunate tendency to just label anyone they dislike a terrorist and chop their head off. Especially if they happen to be Shiite.
The UK and the USA have no problem with absolute monarchies and human rights violations if they sweeten it with a couple of good ol' defence deals
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Napp
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(Original post by BlueIndigoViolet)
The UK and the USA have no problem with absolute monarchies and human rights violations if they sweeten it with a couple of good ol' defence deals
Al Yamamah standing out as an example par excellence :lol:
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Ðeggs
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The laws are a lot more extreme there as there is an official state religion of Islam, so blasphemy etc would be punished by death. The high capital punishment rate doesn’t surprise me.
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Mustafa0605
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They don’t have freedom to protest or other freedom. In the west we see some ghetto people bully and abuse police but if you tried that there you’d be lucky to see the sky again. One good thing about being strict is that their country is very very safe, you don’t need to be scared of getting robbed or attacked or even verbally abused. They are in the middle of the Middle East but they have hardly ever been affected by Isis or al Qaeda because their security (police, border force, intelligence forces) is excellent. Of course their foreign policy on attacking the poorer country- Yemen- is a big war crime and their tough stance on peaceful protestors is against the human rights.
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Napp
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(Original post by Mustafa0605)
They don’t have freedom to protest or other freedom. In the west we see some ghetto people bully and abuse police but if you tried that there you’d be lucky to see the sky again. One good thing about being strict is that their country is very very safe, you don’t need to be scared of getting robbed or attacked or even verbally abused. They are in the middle of the Middle East but they have hardly ever been affected by Isis or al Qaeda because their security (police, border force, intelligence forces) is excellent. Of course their foreign policy on attacking the poorer country- Yemen- is a big war crime and their tough stance on peaceful protestors is against the human rights.
That's not entirely true, there are regularly cases of ISIS/AQ supporters being rounded up in KSA. Equally, the Kingdom has had some quite unpleasant terror attacks in its time. It seems its policy of nurturing then exporting the terrorists is hardly fail safe.
Never mind the repeated missile strikes coming in from their southern border.
Case in point their security services might be good at slaughtering and brutalising their population but they're far from 'excellent'. One need only look to the oil rich provinces where they only maintain control with the force of the army.
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Iñigo de Loyola
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(Original post by Napp)
The problem is the Saudis have a rather unfortunate tendency to just label anyone they dislike a terrorist and chop their head off. Especially if they happen to be Shiite.
I was referring to actual terrorists like Islamic State or (closer to home) the IRA or UVF. In my opinion we should have hanged every British jihadi that returned, but hey ho.
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z-hog
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(Original post by Kitten in boots)
In the eyes of our Conservative government, the Saudi regime is the right kind of brutal dictatorship.
You Guardianistas can talk some serious ****, removed from the real world as you all are.
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QE2
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Given that the constitution of KSA is the Quran and sunnah, it's hardly surprising.
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QE2
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(Original post by LiberOfLondon)
I'm not sure how to feel about this - it depends what they were sentenced to death for IMHO. If they were killed for homosexuality that ought to be condemned, but I've got no problems with hanging terrorists, murderers or rapists.
What if it later transpires that they were innocent?
BTW, as a devout Catholic, I would have thought you would have supported your god's position on the killing of homosexuals.
Also, given your "eye for an eye" philosophy on punishment, shouldn't rapists be ritually ****ed against their will? Which raises an interesting question - would the person carrying out the sentence be given special dispensation against being punished for homosexual sex, or would an inanimate object be used? So many questions, so much time...
Last edited by QE2; 2 years ago
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QE2
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(Original post by LiberOfLondon)
I was referring to actual terrorists like Islamic State or (closer to home) the IRA or UVF. In my opinion we should have hanged every British jihadi that returned, but hey ho.
So you would have hanged the Birmingham Six and the Guildford Four. That's ten innocent people's deaths you already have on your hands. How many more?...
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Napp
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(Original post by QE2)
Given that the constitution of KSA is the Quran and sunnah, it's hardly surprising.
I feel its somewhat weak to blame this on Islam. Given that the Saudi royal family manifestly couldnt give a **** for the religion bar what it gives them in terms of money and international prestige.
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Iñigo de Loyola
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(Original post by QE2)
So you would have hanged the Birmingham Six and the Guildford Four. That's ten innocent people's deaths you already have on your hands. How many more?...
And you would presumably have left Billy Wright or the Kingsmill murderers alive?
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QE2
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(Original post by Napp)
I feel its somewhat weak to blame this on Islam. Given that the Saudi royal family manifestly couldnt give a **** for the religion bar what it gives them in terms of money and international prestige.
I'm not blaming it on Islam. I'm blaming the House of Saud for using Islam as a means to their totalitarian ends. Kinda like how I wouldn't blame the gun that a murderer used, but I would suggest taking guns out of circulation to help prevent further murders.
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QE2
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(Original post by LiberOfLondon)
And you would presumably have left Billy Wright or the Kingsmill murderers alive?
Yes. I am fundamentally opposed to the death penalty.
It is meaningless to say that you support it but only for the guilty, as you have already demonstrated.
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