The Student Room Group

How to get A* at OCR A level chemistry?

How to get A* at OCR A level chemistry?

Scroll to see replies

Reply 1
Constantly reviewing your content, doing topic paper questions once you've finished a topic in class (physics and maths tutor) and doing random retrieval practice. I always had a small notebook where I could do random questions whenever they came up or do a memory mind map, where with the help of little prompts I wrote down everything I remembered from that topic- this really helps you figure out the little details you don't remember. This is especially helpful for organic chemistry and remembering reaction pathways.
Do not rewrite notes unless you are condensing them and spread past papers out so once you get to exam time you are not binging on them and have time to review questions you got wrong. It also helps to stay slightly ahead of the class in terms of content, as once the class goes over a certain topic it is like a revision session for you. Also, if you can, do group sessions with other people doing chemistry, it will help you MASSIVELY especially if they are finding difficult questions that you can work out together as a group.

Websites that have helped me-
Ma Chem Guy (Youtube)
Physics and Maths Tutor
Chemrevise
Mathsmadeeasy
Allery Chemistry (Youtube)
Don't be afraid to randomly search up exam questions from different exam boards- they really help you to understand content in different ways that will help when it comes to more difficult exam questions.

P.S. Make sure you master your AS/ year 12 content!!!!
Original post by absrasra
Constantly reviewing your content, doing topic paper questions once you've finished a topic in class (physics and maths tutor) and doing random retrieval practice. I always had a small notebook where I could do random questions whenever they came up or do a memory mind map, where with the help of little prompts I wrote down everything I remembered from that topic- this really helps you figure out the little details you don't remember. This is especially helpful for organic chemistry and remembering reaction pathways.
Do not rewrite notes unless you are condensing them and spread past papers out so once you get to exam time you are not binging on them and have time to review questions you got wrong. It also helps to stay slightly ahead of the class in terms of content, as once the class goes over a certain topic it is like a revision session for you. Also, if you can, do group sessions with other people doing chemistry, it will help you MASSIVELY especially if they are finding difficult questions that you can work out together as a group.

Websites that have helped me-
Ma Chem Guy (Youtube)
Physics and Maths Tutor
Chemrevise
Mathsmadeeasy
Allery Chemistry (Youtube)
Don't be afraid to randomly search up exam questions from different exam boards- they really help you to understand content in different ways that will help when it comes to more difficult exam questions.

P.S. Make sure you master your AS/ year 12 content!!!!

Thanks for the tips. I hope you don't mind me asking but what exam board are you doing and what is your current grade?
Reply 3
Original post by nkva
How to get A* at OCR A level chemistry?

Are you currently Y12?

If you are, then the guaranteed method is to just get all the questions right on the three exams you'll take next year.

If you can't do that, then just get virtually all of them right and you'll probably do enough for an A*.
I heard OCR A level chemistry is harder than AQA as it has lots of maths.
i got you
.............
(edited 3 years ago)
Reply 7
Original post by nkva
I heard OCR A level chemistry is harder than AQA as it has lots of maths.

By law it is just as hard to get an A* with OCR A as it is with all the other boards.

A consistent difference over recent years is that AQA have lower grade boundaries, which suggests harder exam papers.
If anyone is looking for a chemistry tutor, let me know! I'm currently tutoring online and have some availability :smile:
Annie message me I’m looking for a tutor
It's not for everyone but I mostly learnt by error. Before I even began any form of revision I'd look up old exam papers - the oldest you can find that have the same criteria and attempt 3/4 of them, even some from different exam boards. Find where the holes in your knowledge are and fill them. You'll start to notice that a lot of questions are repeated but rephrased, if you look at the newly added modules that occur each year they always have very specific questions relating to them. Write model answers, memorise generic formulas and processes, read the chapter from your revision book and repeat a few more past papers and repeat every time you find a fault until there aren't any

This is more of a strategy to ace an exam than become proficient in a subject. But it's a great way to speed learn how to pass a specific criteria exam. I applied the same thing to all my A-levels, I did maths, further, Chem, bio, physics. Worked especially well for Chem and bio.

The only exemption is the maths and calculations. Those I mostly just spent an hour or so hammering out a few questions, matching the step to the mark scheme and memorising any necessary equations and formula. That way even if you botch a rounding error or use the wrong valued you'll get the majority of the marks based on theory.

*I sat WJEC in 2014*
make sure you can remember the rules and patterns, constantly test yourself early, and do lots of practice question on the maths etc. anything you find hard you should aim to figure it out to some extent before you start revising.

mark schemes for ocr aren't always that useful so it's worth, if doing a past paper and you don't understand the method ask for teacher.

If you struggle with maths this NEEDS to be your key focus since it is quite maths heavy ( I was consistently revising and practicing maths) youll dtruggle get above a c without the maths since they're longer questions on the whole, and if you get the start wrong your done for that question.

good luck, if you need help pm me :smile:
Original post by absrasra
Constantly reviewing your content, doing topic paper questions once you've finished a topic in class (physics and maths tutor) and doing random retrieval practice. I always had a small notebook where I could do random questions whenever they came up or do a memory mind map, where with the help of little prompts I wrote down everything I remembered from that topic- this really helps you figure out the little details you don't remember. This is especially helpful for organic chemistry and remembering reaction pathways.
Do not rewrite notes unless you are condensing them and spread past papers out so once you get to exam time you are not binging on them and have time to review questions you got wrong. It also helps to stay slightly ahead of the class in terms of content, as once the class goes over a certain topic it is like a revision session for you. Also, if you can, do group sessions with other people doing chemistry, it will help you MASSIVELY especially if they are finding difficult questions that you can work out together as a group.

Websites that have helped me-
Ma Chem Guy (Youtube)
Physics and Maths Tutor
Chemrevise
Mathsmadeeasy
Allery Chemistry (Youtube)
Don't be afraid to randomly search up exam questions from different exam boards- they really help you to understand content in different ways that will help when it comes to more difficult exam questions.

P.S. Make sure you master your AS/ year 12 content!!!!


Hi

i hope you are well I want to do A level but I have already picked my options so I have to cover As myself do have any tips how to do it and what to do if you don’t know how to do a specific caculation.
Reply 13
Original post by A level help
Hi

i hope you are well I want to do A level but I have already picked my options so I have to cover As myself do have any tips how to do it and what to do if you don’t know how to do a specific caculation.

Keep doing exam questions and ensure you always know the basic stuff (drawing molecules, skeletal structures). youtube is a great source of help if you do not understand a topic. i am a chemistry tutor, so message me if you need any help! :smile:
Original post by Zac1010
Keep doing exam questions and ensure you always know the basic stuff (drawing molecules, skeletal structures). youtube is a great source of help if you do not understand a topic. i am a chemistry tutor, so message me if you need any help! :smile:


Thank you so much. I will.
Original post by annieapple2000
If anyone is looking for a chemistry tutor, let me know! I'm currently tutoring online and have some availability :smile:


Hi, are you still tutoring? What is your success rate if you don’t mind me asking
Original post by username4500012
How to get A* at OCR A level chemistry?

revise as much as possible and do topic tests after studying section. I used Tyrion Papers for topic tests. There's also so many other sites. Dm if you want a list
Reply 17
Original post by absrasra
Constantly reviewing your content, doing topic paper questions once you've finished a topic in class (physics and maths tutor) and doing random retrieval practice. I always had a small notebook where I could do random questions whenever they came up or do a memory mind map, where with the help of little prompts I wrote down everything I remembered from that topic- this really helps you figure out the little details you don't remember. This is especially helpful for organic chemistry and remembering reaction pathways.
Do not rewrite notes unless you are condensing them and spread past papers out so once you get to exam time you are not binging on them and have time to review questions you got wrong. It also helps to stay slightly ahead of the class in terms of content, as once the class goes over a certain topic it is like a revision session for you. Also, if you can, do group sessions with other people doing chemistry, it will help you MASSIVELY especially if they are finding difficult questions that you can work out together as a group.

Websites that have helped me-
Ma Chem Guy (Youtube)
Physics and Maths Tutor
Chemrevise
Mathsmadeeasy
Allery Chemistry (Youtube)
Don't be afraid to randomly search up exam questions from different exam boards- they really help you to understand content in different ways that will help when it comes to more difficult exam questions.

P.S. Make sure you master your AS/ year 12 content!!!!

Hi I looked at MME but it appears that all their past paper questions - topic questions - are for AQA only. Will doing AQA Chem questions help me even if I'm doing OCR?
Reply 18
Original post by Alesha_sk
Hi I looked at MME but it appears that all their past paper questions - topic questions - are for AQA only. Will doing AQA Chem questions help me even if I'm doing OCR?

There isn't one simple answer.

AQA studies some topics that aren't on the OCR spec, which won't be a problem if you know the OCR spec well enough so that you can quickly decide not to do a Q. The flip side of that is that certain topics are on the OCR spec that aren't on the AQA spec, so you won't get tested on all of the OCR spec by doing AQA papers.

The style of questioning is really rather different. OCR are (IMO) much better at telling you in the Q what you need to do to get the marks.

The biggest issue will be the mark schemes. There are certain phrases and standard answers that OCR require that you won't see on an AQA MS.

If I were you, I'd probably be doing AQA papers first and use the OCR papers closer to the real exams, when you can properly focus on the exacting wording of the OCR MSs.
Original post by Pigster
Are you currently Y12?

If you are, then the guaranteed method is to just get all the questions right on the three exams you'll take next year.

If you can't do that, then just get virtually all of them right and you'll probably do enough for an A*.

Hi,


I am in year 12 can you give me tips on how to get an A* in A level chemistry.I do AQA . What is that method.

Quick Reply

Latest