I'm a History Graduate - Ask me Anything

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04MR17
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#1
Hello all! :hello:

I've just graduated with a History (and Education) degree from Keele university.
If you have questions about what it's like to study history at uni, the best things to include in your personal statement or any other questions about applying to uni for History, drop them below. :grin:



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This AMA is part of the 'Ask a University Student 2.0' initiative. If you want to find out more about other courses or universities, please check out the main list of threads:
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=6431108
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angusgmoncrieff
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(Original post by MartinisSkip)
Hey! I'm a third year joint honours student studying Ancient History and History and Uni of Manchester. Please, feel free to ask me all the questions you want about this course, or just one of the two subjects.

barror1
Hi,

I was wondering if you were less likely to receive an offer for Ancient History if you had not previously studied a classical language. Would this be a problem for competitive universities, such as KCL and Manchester etc?

Also, is Ancient History an employable degree? I know that History is an attractive degree to have because it shows that you possess a variety valuable skills, but does Ancient History carry the same high value...
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username2244141
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(Original post by angusgmoncrieff)
Hi,

I was wondering if you were less likely to receive an offer for Ancient History if you had not previously studied a classical language. Would this be a problem for competitive universities, such as KCL and Manchester etc?

Also, is Ancient History an employable degree? I know that History is an attractive degree to have because it shows that you possess a variety valuable skills, but does Ancient History carry the same high value...
Hey,

At Manchester at least, I know for sure it won't go against you, because I've never done one either. It's a subject at very few schools, so I imagine most unis, even competitive ones, would not penalise at all. At some, including Manchester, as long as you have studied History, you don't even need to have studied Ancient History or Classics. If you choose to go to Manchester, one of the things during freshers includes a 'language day', so you could see if you wanted to study a language then, but it's not necessary that you do if you don't want to.

Unfortunately, as far as I'm aware, Ancient History doesn't carry the weight that History does, I think it's because it's more focused than History. I'm hoping to go into teaching, and the reason I've chosen the joint honours course is because Ancient History is not taught in many schools/colleges, so I'd rather not take my chances. Plus, say if you wanted to teach Classics, then you would need to learn a classical language while you're in uni, and it's very competitive. Still, for the most part you would be gaining the same skills as History, so in interviews you can show that you have picked up the relevant skills.

I'd speak to other unis you're interested in about this, but at Manchester at least, if you are really interested in Ancient History but are worried about being employable, doing History as a course would be good because you can still pick Ancient modules. Or, there's my course: you do half and half in the first year, but then in subsequent years you could pick more Ancient over modern, or vice versa.
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angusgmoncrieff
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This is what it says on KCL's website:

"Members of staff then consider how far the applicant has shown evidence of the qualities of mind we most value in potential Classics, Classical Studies, Ancient History or Classical Archaeology students, and of aptitude for linguistic study."

I am from Scotland so I do 'Scottish Highers' (equivalent to AS level) and I study Higher French, do you think that this would show that I have an "aptitude for linguistic study"?

Also, would you say that Ancient History is competitive because of the fact that there won't be many spaces on the course?
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(Original post by angusgmoncrieff)
This is what it says on KCL's website:

"Members of staff then consider how far the applicant has shown evidence of the qualities of mind we most value in potential Classics, Classical Studies, Ancient History or Classical Archaeology students, and of aptitude for linguistic study."

I am from Scotland so I do 'Scottish Highers' (equivalent to AS level) and I study Higher French, do you think that this would show that I have an "aptitude for linguistic study"?

Also, would you say that Ancient History is competitive because of the fact that there won't be many spaces on the course?
I would imagine so, I'd email admissions at KCL though to be sure.

As a course in itself, and not for a PGCE, I'd say it's actually less competitive. Because at most unis, if you do History you can still pick Ancient modules, people prefer to take the subject that's seen to be more employable. Plus, many believe that they won't be able to do it, because they've only done modern History, and no ancient, so prefer to stick with that. There were only 12 spaces on my course, because it was new when I first applied. I imagined it would be very hard to get an offer, but only 3 people in the end applied and got on the course, because people like to either go for one or the other.
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angusgmoncrieff
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(Original post by MartinisSkip)
I would imagine so, I'd email admissions at KCL though to be sure.

As a course in itself, and not for a PGCE, I'd say it's actually less competitive. Because at most unis, if you do History you can still pick Ancient modules, people prefer to take the subject that's seen to be more employable. Plus, many believe that they won't be able to do it, because they've only done modern History, and no ancient, so prefer to stick with that. There were only 12 spaces on my course, because it was new when I first applied. I imagined it would be very hard to get an offer, but only 3 people in the end applied and got on the course, because people like to either go for one or the other.
Would you say that more and more people are applying for Ancient History, is it becoming a more popular course to study?

Also, could it be expected that old and established Ancient History courses would be oversubscribed and very competitive because of the limited amount of places?

What other universities did you apply to?

Did you want to study Ancient History and History at all of the universities you applied for?

Did you get offers from all 5 universities?

Also, if you wouldn't mind me asking what did you get in your A-levels?

Finally, because there are very few on the course would you say that you have a gotten to know the professors well and that you have been able to tailor the degree to your wants?

(Sorry for asking so many questions )
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(Original post by angusgmoncrieff)
Would you say that more and more people are applying for Ancient History, is it becoming a more popular course to study?

Also, could it be expected that old and established Ancient History courses would be oversubscribed and very competitive because of the limited amount of places?

What other universities did you apply to?

Did you want to study Ancient History and History at all of the universities you applied for?

Did you get offers from all 5 universities?

Also, if you wouldn't mind me asking what did you get in your A-levels?

Finally, because there are very few on the course would you say that you have a gotten to know the professors well and that you have been able to tailor the degree to your wants?

(Sorry for asking so many questions )
Don't worry about all the questions, that's what this thread's all about and it distracts me from my work which is always a plus!

I actually think Ancient History is becoming less popular, which is a great shame, and if you're interested in doing it please don't take that as a sign you shouldn't! I work part time at my old college at enrolment, and the last year I was there and my old Ancient History tutor told me that they had to cancel it that year because only a few people had signed up, it was quite sad. I took it with modern History, but I definitely prefer the Ancient stuff and my dissertation is solely Ancient History (though, you can choose to do it solely modern or a mix). I think most people are so focused on employability, they forget that Ancient History is interesting and has the same skills. Plus, since some schools/colleges don't offer it as a subject, they worry that they won't be able to do it at uni level. A lot of History students I know who have to pick an Ancient course always worry at the start of the course, but they get used to it.

I doubt that they will be oversubscribed, mostly for the reasons just above. Plus, there are so many joint honours options, like Archaeology and Ancient History and that sort of thing, so Ancient History shouldn't be very competitive nor oversubscribed.

I actually went to Warwick uni for a year studying History, but dropped out. I personally found that uni wasn't for me, and they made it difficult to pick Ancient modules, and it was then I realised I wanted more Ancient History. I applied to Lancaster in the same year as applying for Warwick, but again, that was for History and if I remember they didn't actually offer Ancient History. I also applied to Kent, Plymouth, and Edinburgh. I got offers from all five for History, but chose Warwick because of the prestige, really.

I then applied only for Manchester after dropping out, because I saw the joint honours option. I wanted to do modern History as well, because I want to do a PGCE in History. Other unis don't offer the joint honours course, as far as I'm aware, but many do let you cross modules - so if you do History, you can do Ancient modules, or vice versa, which is equally a good choice. I took Ancient History and History simply because for some of the Ancient History compulsory modules, if Ancient History had a large amount of students that year and I'd only taken History, I wouldn't have the option of taking that Ancient compulsory module, if that makes sense?

My A Level results were A* (Sociology), A (History), A (Ancient History), but the requirements for Manchester for Ancient History and History are AAB.

Definitely, yeah. I won't lie to you, there are some that need pestering some, but most are really on the ball and great to get along with. Like with a lot of art subjects, a lot of the time your essays will have to cater somewhat to what the professor likes in essays - for example, some professors at uni like coin evidence A LOT, so in those essays, I always make sure to include several coins to support my points. There's a classics library, too, which students share with professors, so you can really get to know them there. Plus, as an Ancient History student, you get the option of joining archaeological digs in summer - I haven't done it because I'm quite lazy, but I heard that you make real bonds on those things with students as well as the professors who supervise.

One of the things I like about my choice is that, unlike other subjects, you get to decide your dissertation topic from scratch. It might sound daunting right now, but I was so glad I got to pick mine from something I found interesting. For other subjects, like History, you usually have to pick a module and come up with a question to do with that module, like if you're doing a module on Nazi Germany, you'd do a dissertation on that. With that system comes a great deal of competitiveness to do certain modules, and you can miss out. However, with Ancient History, they basically said that anything we've found interesting we can do it on, and they'd assign us a supervisor then. There are obviously some boundaries, but for the most part, you get a bit of free reign.
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angusgmoncrieff
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(Original post by MartinisSkip)
Don't worry about all the questions, that's what this thread's all about and it distracts me from my work which is always a plus!

I actually think Ancient History is becoming less popular, which is a great shame, and if you're interested in doing it please don't take that as a sign you shouldn't! I work part time at my old college at enrolment, and the last year I was there and my old Ancient History tutor told me that they had to cancel it that year because only a few people had signed up, it was quite sad. I took it with modern History, but I definitely prefer the Ancient stuff and my dissertation is solely Ancient History (though, you can choose to do it solely modern or a mix). I think most people are so focused on employability, they forget that Ancient History is interesting and has the same skills. Plus, since some schools/colleges don't offer it as a subject, they worry that they won't be able to do it at uni level. A lot of History students I know who have to pick an Ancient course always worry at the start of the course, but they get used to it.

I doubt that they will be oversubscribed, mostly for the reasons just above. Plus, there are so many joint honours options, like Archaeology and Ancient History and that sort of thing, so Ancient History shouldn't be very competitive nor oversubscribed.

I actually went to Warwick uni for a year studying History, but dropped out. I personally found that uni wasn't for me, and they made it difficult to pick Ancient modules, and it was then I realised I wanted more Ancient History. I applied to Lancaster in the same year as applying for Warwick, but again, that was for History and if I remember they didn't actually offer Ancient History. I also applied to Kent, Plymouth, and Edinburgh. I got offers from all five for History, but chose Warwick because of the prestige, really.

I then applied only for Manchester after dropping out, because I saw the joint honours option. I wanted to do modern History as well, because I want to do a PGCE in History. Other unis don't offer the joint honours course, as far as I'm aware, but many do let you cross modules - so if you do History, you can do Ancient modules, or vice versa, which is equally a good choice. I took Ancient History and History simply because for some of the Ancient History compulsory modules, if Ancient History had a large amount of students that year and I'd only taken History, I wouldn't have the option of taking that Ancient compulsory module, if that makes sense?

My A Level results were A* (Sociology), A (History), A (Ancient History), but the requirements for Manchester for Ancient History and History are AAB.

Definitely, yeah. I won't lie to you, there are some that need pestering some, but most are really on the ball and great to get along with. Like with a lot of art subjects, a lot of the time your essays will have to cater somewhat to what the professor likes in essays - for example, some professors at uni like coin evidence A LOT, so in those essays, I always make sure to include several coins to support my points. There's a classics library, too, which students share with professors, so you can really get to know them there. Plus, as an Ancient History student, you get the option of joining archaeological digs in summer - I haven't done it because I'm quite lazy, but I heard that you make real bonds on those things with students as well as the professors who supervise.

One of the things I like about my choice is that, unlike other subjects, you get to decide your dissertation topic from scratch. It might sound daunting right now, but I was so glad I got to pick mine from something I found interesting. For other subjects, like History, you usually have to pick a module and come up with a question to do with that module, like if you're doing a module on Nazi Germany, you'd do a dissertation on that. With that system comes a great deal of competitiveness to do certain modules, and you can miss out. However, with Ancient History, they basically said that anything we've found interesting we can do it on, and they'd assign us a supervisor then. There are obviously some boundaries, but for the most part, you get a bit of free reign.
In your opinion, which degree has more of a focus on the classical languages: Ancient History or Classics?

Also, do you think it would be possible to do a GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law) after graduating with a degree in Ancient History? I know that quite a few people that study subjects like History at university go on to do a GDL, but was just wondering if this was the same for those that choose Classics degrees, such as Ancient History.
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(Original post by angusgmoncrieff)
In your opinion, which degree has more of a focus on the classical languages: Ancient History or Classics?

Also, do you think it would be possible to do a GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law) after graduating with a degree in Ancient History? I know that quite a few people that study subjects like History at university go on to do a GDL, but was just wondering if this was the same for those that choose Classics degrees, such as Ancient History.
Classics definitely has more focus on the languages. Classics is more to do with the literature, whereas Ancient History is more to do with society and that sort of thing, so Classics requires more focus on the language. It's not a huge thing, but when you come to do your dissertation and you're doing Classics, that's when it can be quite important, because you'll be looking at different translations etc. and there will be different words in different translations that can change your arguments. But, then it still depends on what topic you pick for essays/dissertation, because with some it'll be less or more important. They give you the option of studying a language in first year, and they give you a test halfway through the year, so if you're not doing well they won't make you go on with it any more and you don't have to worry about those credits.

It should be possible, I'd say. Ancient History gives you many of the same skills as History, so it should be just as applicable as History for a GDL.
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angusgmoncrieff
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(Original post by MartinisSkip)
Classics definitely has more focus on the languages. Classics is more to do with the literature, whereas Ancient History is more to do with society and that sort of thing, so Classics requires more focus on the language. It's not a huge thing, but when you come to do your dissertation and you're doing Classics, that's when it can be quite important, because you'll be looking at different translations etc. and there will be different words in different translations that can change your arguments. But, then it still depends on what topic you pick for essays/dissertation, because with some it'll be less or more important. They give you the option of studying a language in first year, and they give you a test halfway through the year, so if you're not doing well they won't make you go on with it any more and you don't have to worry about those credits.

It should be possible, I'd say. Ancient History gives you many of the same skills as History, so it should be just as applicable as History for a GDL.
You said previously that there were 12 spaces on your course but only 3 applied and got onto it. Do you think that because there is such a low demand for courses such as Ancient History that universities are likely to be lenient when it comes to entry requirements. If you are one or maybe even two grades below the 'standard entry grades/entry requirements' are you still going to be made an offer. Are the universities desperate to fill spaces on Classics courses like Ancient History?
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(Original post by angusgmoncrieff)
You said previously that there were 12 spaces on your course but only 3 applied and got onto it. Do you think that because there is such a low demand for courses such as Ancient History that universities are likely to be lenient when it comes to entry requirements. If you are one or maybe even two grades below the 'standard entry grades/entry requirements' are you still going to be made an offer. Are the universities desperate to fill spaces on Classics courses like Ancient History?
I know that when I applied, another person on the course told me they had got below the requirements, but were accepted. I imagine part of that, though, was because it was a new course so not many people had been looking for it.

Obviously, I can't speak for all unis, and I haven't heard anything about students applying in subsequent years, or for straight Ancient History.
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angusgmoncrieff
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(Original post by MartinisSkip)
I know that when I applied, another person on the course told me they had got below the requirements, but were accepted. I imagine part of that, though, was because it was a new course so not many people had been looking for it.

Obviously, I can't speak for all unis, and I haven't heard anything about students applying in subsequent years, or for straight Ancient History.
Would you say that straight Ancient History is more competitive than Ancient History and History?

Would you agree that at Manchester the History and Ancient History professors are good at explaining concepts, available if needed and, most importantly truly passionate about Ancient History?

Also, what extra/supercurricuars did you do and how did you relate these to Ancient History and History?

How do you find Manchester as a city? Is it lively? Does it tend to live up to its reputation as being a 'party university'?

What are your contact hours? Would you rather have more or less hours hours being taught by the professors, or do you prefer studying by yourself?

How did you tailor your personal statement to show your interests in both Ancient History and History?

Finally, in your opinion would it be impossible to apply for straight Ancient History at some universities and Ancient History and History at others?
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#13
(Original post by angusgmoncrieff)
Would you say that straight Ancient History is more competitive than Ancient History and History?

Would you agree that at Manchester the History and Ancient History professors are good at explaining concepts, available if needed and, most importantly truly passionate about History?

Also, what extra/supercurricuars did you do and how did you relate these to Ancient History and History?

How do you find Manchester as a city? Is it lively? Does it live up to its reputation as being a 'party university'?

What are your contact hours? Would you rather have more or less hours hours being taught by the professors, or do you prefer studying by yourself?

How dd you tailor your personal statement to show your internets in both Ancient History and History?

Finally, in your opinion would it be impossible to apply for straight Ancient History at some universities and Ancient History and History at others?
I would think so, yeah. The thing is, though, at Manchester at least, there are quite a few combinations so many Ancient History students are also doing a joint honours, so it won't be incredibly competitive. With Ancient History and History, what I've found is that most students are sort of set in their ways, preferring one over the other.

Yeah, I'd definitely say so. I said before that sometimes you have to cater your essays to certain professors' likes and dislikes, and you really get to understand these at Manchester. They always take the time to go through things, and they're always there to speak to if you need them. One professor actually organised an Ancient History podcast for the students to take part in (voluntary), so you went into groups and came up with a theme and then got to record it and get a prize at the end (I'm afraid I didn't win).

I've done a lot of volunteer work at museums, and Manchester uni has one in the campus so that's always great to use. I've also done some shadowing at schools of History lessons, and at a college induction day I taught Ancient History lessons to the new students.

I like Manchester, but if you're looking for sunshine go somewhere else! It helps that the History building is really pretty, but if you go there you actually end up in buildings all over campus (some are nicer than others). Manchester also 100% lives up to being a 'party uni'. I'm not a proper party person, and the place is good for both kind of people to be fair, but yeah it's good for a party. There are a lot of clubs for a lot of different types of people. There's different accommodation for your needs though, so if you don't want to party, most people go for Victoria Park, but then Fallowfield is the main place for the parties.

So, in first and second year, you get 3 hours a week per module, and you'll take 3 modules per term. The 3 hours are split up with 2x 1 hour lectures, and a 1 hour seminar. When you get to third year, Ancient History modules will continue that sort of model, but History modules become a single 3 hour class which is a mix between a lecture and a seminar. Personally, I like few hours, because I just like studying myself. There are always office hours with professors, though, usually 2 hours in a week, so you can see them if you want to, and you can always organise a meeting with them if that's not enough. A lot of the course really is so centred around reading that 3 hours is fair. If I went in for fewer hours, I think I'd probably have no motivation or structure to do anything.

My personal statement was actually quite basic, because I have no idea how you're properly supposed to 'stand out' in those things. I followed a basic model of first describing how I initially became interested in History, then briefly discussed my other A Levels. Then I did two separate paragraphs, one on some reading I'd done into modern History outside of my A Levels, and then similarly with the Ancient History paragraph, and at the end of those I explained that it's more interesting to me to get a broader view of History, especially because it's something I want to teach. I think showing them perhaps you have an idea of what you want to do is good, but not necessary if you don't have a plan.

Sorry, could you just clarify the last question? I'm getting different interpretations in my head and I don't want to give you an unrelated answer
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angusgmoncrieff
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(Original post by MartinisSkip)
I would think so, yeah. The thing is, though, at Manchester at least, there are quite a few combinations so many Ancient History students are also doing a joint honours, so it won't be incredibly competitive. With Ancient History and History, what I've found is that most students are sort of set in their ways, preferring one over the other.

Yeah, I'd definitely say so. I said before that sometimes you have to cater your essays to certain professors' likes and dislikes, and you really get to understand these at Manchester. They always take the time to go through things, and they're always there to speak to if you need them. One professor actually organised an Ancient History podcast for the students to take part in (voluntary), so you went into groups and came up with a theme and then got to record it and get a prize at the end (I'm afraid I didn't win).

I've done a lot of volunteer work at museums, and Manchester uni has one in the campus so that's always great to use. I've also done some shadowing at schools of History lessons, and at a college induction day I taught Ancient History lessons to the new students.

I like Manchester, but if you're looking for sunshine go somewhere else! It helps that the History building is really pretty, but if you go there you actually end up in buildings all over campus (some are nicer than others). Manchester also 100% lives up to being a 'party uni'. I'm not a proper party person, and the place is good for both kind of people to be fair, but yeah it's good for a party. There are a lot of clubs for a lot of different types of people. There's different accommodation for your needs though, so if you don't want to party, most people go for Victoria Park, but then Fallowfield is the main place for the parties.

So, in first and second year, you get 3 hours a week per module, and you'll take 3 modules per term. The 3 hours are split up with 2x 1 hour lectures, and a 1 hour seminar. When you get to third year, Ancient History modules will continue that sort of model, but History modules become a single 3 hour class which is a mix between a lecture and a seminar. Personally, I like few hours, because I just like studying myself. There are always office hours with professors, though, usually 2 hours in a week, so you can see them if you want to, and you can always organise a meeting with them if that's not enough. A lot of the course really is so centred around reading that 3 hours is fair. If I went in for fewer hours, I think I'd probably have no motivation or structure to do anything.

My personal statement was actually quite basic, because I have no idea how you're properly supposed to 'stand out' in those things. I followed a basic model of first describing how I initially became interested in History, then briefly discussed my other A Levels. Then I did two separate paragraphs, one on some reading I'd done into modern History outside of my A Levels, and then similarly with the Ancient History paragraph, and at the end of those I explained that it's more interesting to me to get a broader view of History, especially because it's something I want to teach. I think showing them perhaps you have an idea of what you want to do is good, but not necessary if you don't have a plan.

Sorry, could you just clarify the last question? I'm getting different interpretations in my head and I don't want to give you an unrelated answer
Thank you for replying in such great detail.

In regards to the last question I was trying to say if you think that it would be possible to apply for History and Ancient History at say 2 of your 5 university choices and straight Ancient History at the other 3, or would this be too hard as UCAS only allow for one Personal statement to be submitted.

Also, do you think doing History related activities, such as volunteering at a museum, or starting a History club, is vital when applying for courses such as Ancient History, or would you say in-depth reading around the subject conveys this passion just aswell? Could you perhaps recommend some books or texts that would be good to reference on an Ancient History personal statement...

Finally, did you mention any extracurriculars on your PS that you managed to link to your degree and if so how?
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(Original post by angusgmoncrieff)
Thank you for replying in such great detail.

In regards to the last question I was trying to say if you think that it would be possible to apply for History and Ancient History at say 2 of your 5 university choices and straight Ancient History at the other 3, or would this be too hard as UCAS only allow for one Personal statement to be submitted.

Also, do you think doing History related activities, such as volunteering at a museum, or starting a History club, is vital when applying for courses such as Ancient History, or would you say in-depth reading around the subject conveys this passion just aswell? Could you perhaps recommend some books or texts that would be good to reference on an Ancient History personal statement...

Finally, did you mention any extracurriculars on your PS that you managed to link to your degree and if so how?
No worries, I hope it's all helpful

It shouldn't be too difficult, I wouldn't think. I'd just put more effort to focus on Ancient History, while still putting some information about your interest in History as a whole.

Reading works just as well. Most of my extracurricular stuff didn't really happen until I started uni anyway, so most of my personal statement was focused on reading I'd done outside of college. I mentioned some extracurricular activities, but there's such a strict limit on what you can write that it wasn't much. I wrote it in my final paragraph, where I just briefly described some volunteering I'd done. For example, I mentioned my time at a local museum.

I used Suetonius' Twelve Caesars, but really, as long as it's mostly academic then it's useful. Jerry Toner's books could be good to mention, as they are half academic, half descriptive sort of things, or some Mary Beard books like SPQR. If you don't have time to read them, look up summaries online so you can mention briefly in the personal statement what you took from them. Check where you're applying if they have an interview for your subject, just in case, but usually there aren't interviews for Ancient History so if you don't have the time it should be fine to read an online summary.
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angusgmoncrieff
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#16
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#16
(Original post by MartinisSkip)
No worries, I hope it's all helpful

It shouldn't be too difficult, I wouldn't think. I'd just put more effort to focus on Ancient History, while still putting some information about your interest in History as a whole.

Reading works just as well. Most of my extracurricular stuff didn't really happen until I started uni anyway, so most of my personal statement was focused on reading I'd done outside of college. I mentioned some extracurricular activities, but there's such a strict limit on what you can write that it wasn't much. I wrote it in my final paragraph, where I just briefly described some volunteering I'd done. For example, I mentioned my time at a local museum.

I used Suetonius' Twelve Caesars, but really, as long as it's mostly academic then it's useful. Jerry Toner's books could be good to mention, as they are half academic, half descriptive sort of things, or some Mary Beard books like SPQR. If you don't have time to read them, look up summaries online so you can mention briefly in the personal statement what you took from them. Check where you're applying if they have an interview for your subject, just in case, but usually there aren't interviews for Ancient History so if you don't have the time it should be fine to read an online summary.
You have been such a great help!

Thank you for taking the time to answer all of my questions and in such great detail.
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username2244141
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#17
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#17
(Original post by angusgmoncrieff)
You have been such a great help!

Thank you for taking the time to answer all of my questions and in such great detail.
No worries! I hope your applications all go well
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MarkoColes
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#18
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#18
(Original post by username2244141)
No worries! I hope your applications all go well
Hi there, Apologies for asking a question 8 months later (and I’m unsure if you’re still here lol) but I’ve received an offer for Ancient History at Manchester and I was wondering how many students were on your course when you were there? Many thanks
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think_patronus
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#19
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#19
Hello,

suggestions on how to find what books to read? I do not know any historian! If I look for books on topic x, I find such a variety that I do not know which one would sound better. Is finding a book whose author is defined as an historian enough? Or should it be a specific kind of historian?

Like, I read Sapiens, written by a historian, but I guess it sounds so basic?
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04MR17
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#20
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by think_patronus)
Hello,

suggestions on how to find what books to read? I do not know any historian! If I look for books on topic x, I find such a variety that I do not know which one would sound better. Is finding a book whose author is defined as an historian enough? Or should it be a specific kind of historian?

Like, I read Sapiens, written by a historian, but I guess it sounds so basic?
There's no particular "type" of historian that universities will be looking for you to have read. :nah:
If you're looking for something general about history then Why History Matters by John Tosh might be a good start.
Or perhaps History: A Very short introduction could be good for you.

If you want to read some proper history then it really depends on what you are interested in. You might want to read Black Tudors, which is a very popular text in the last couple of years. Maybe something by David Olusoga would be good, as he's pretty current. Better still, read something loosely related to your current studies - if you're doing A Levels/SQA, what topics are you looking at currently in History?
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