cxm405
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I have recently been Informed by capita that after consulting my GP report that I have been deemed medically unfit to join the RAF due to anxiety related health issues.

During sixth form I began suffering with anxiety, and was treated for a small period of time beta blockers to alleviate my moderate symptoms. This occurred again when I attended university, and again i was treated for a very small time with beta blockers.

Since then I have not received any therapy or drug based treatments (over 3 years).

According to the appeals process I must provide proof of only one episode, however both treatments were due to academic stress and were only when the symptoms became difficult to deal with. It could be argued that this was an extended episode.
Also, I was Informed by the doctor who completed my initial medical that it depended on the duration of time I "suffered" with the anxiety.

Any advice or encouragement would be greatly appreciated.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by cxm405)
I have recently been Informed by capita that after consulting my GP report that I have been deemed medically unfit to join the RAF due to anxiety related health issues.

During sixth form I began suffering with anxiety, and was treated for a small period of time beta blockers to alleviate my moderate symptoms. This occurred again when I attended university, and again i was treated for a very small time with beta blockers.

Since then I have not received any therapy or drug based treatments (over 3 years).

According to the appeals process I must provide proof of only one episode, however both treatments were due to academic stress and were only when the symptoms became difficult to deal with. It could be argued that this was an extended episode.
Also, I was Informed by the doctor who completed my initial medical that it depended on the duration of time I "suffered" with the anxiety.

Any advice or encouragement would be greatly appreciated.
I'm afraid it's going to be very difficult to change that result. It doesn't really matter that it was academic stress, in fact that makes it worse, because academic stress doesn't really rate against real-world stresses. I doubt they will take the view that it is 'extended' because it was different types of education years apart, in different locations, different people and resources around etc. And the Armed Forces regularly and repeatedly applied far more pressure than school or university, so the conclusion they have drawn is that you aren't resilient enough for service.

If you have the time and determination, I guess you could live a busy, pressurised life, achieve a lot, do thing which demonstrate resilience etc and re-apply in 3-5 years and see if they take a different view then.

I don't know if the Reserves would take the same view?
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Surnia
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More information on appeals here:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6178284

No-one on here, or in the AFCO, can advise further than this, or say whether or not your appeal will be successful; tthat is down to the medical professionals. Follow the instructions you have been given, and provide as much written evidence you can from your GP or a specialist.
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cxm405
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
I'm afraid it's going to be very difficult to change that result. It doesn't really matter that it was academic stress, in fact that makes it worse, because academic stress doesn't really rate against real-world stresses. I doubt they will take the view that it is 'extended' because it was different types of education years apart, in different locations, different people and resources around etc. And the Armed Forces regularly and repeatedly applied far more pressure than school or university, so the conclusion they have drawn is that you aren't resilient enough for service.

If you have the time and determination, I guess you could live a busy, pressurised life, achieve a lot, do thing which demonstrate resilience etc and re-apply in 3-5 years and see if they take a different view then.

I don't know if the Reserves would take the same view?
A levels are quite a stressful time, workloads are extensive, and I was living at home during my time at university as well. There is a lot riding on exams etc during these times and anxiety issues aren't uncommon.
There is no guidelines on what reasons for anxiety will and will not be accepted. And again the doctor who completed my medical said the only time a reason would get me an automatic fail was if there was no cause of my anxiety.
I have been out of university for 4 years now and have worked multiple jobs with long and or unsociable hours as well as working away from home for extended periods.

I understand the stringent nature, I was just hoping to see if anyone had been through the same as me but had been successful in there appeal.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by cxm405)
A levels are quite a stressful time, workloads are extensive, and I was living at home during my time at university as well. There is a lot riding on exams etc during these times and anxiety issues aren't uncommon.
I'm afraid they don't compare with the stresses of service life - living away from home - you could get posted overseas for years, you could get deployed overseas with just hours notice and then live in a tent in field conditions for months on end, And in doing that, you need to perform better than you did when living in the UK.

Many Armed Forces jobs have a very short process between the decision you make and someone potentially losing their life. The selection process needs to ask themselves if you are capable of making those decisions in a couple of years time when you are out of training. You haven't set down evidence or a trajectory that you have.

You can try and put together an appeal that suggests it was a single episode, but I think you should prepare for an alternative career.
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Surnia
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(Original post by cxm405)
A levels are quite a stressful time, workloads are extensive, and I was living at home during my time at university as well. There is a lot riding on exams etc during these times and anxiety issues aren't uncommon.
There is no guidelines on what reasons for anxiety will and will not be accepted. And again the doctor who completed my medical said the only time a reason would get me an automatic fail was if there was no cause of my anxiety.
I have been out of university for 4 years now and have worked multiple jobs with long and or unsociable hours as well as working away from home for extended periods.

I understand the stringent nature, I was just hoping to see if anyone had been through the same as me but had been successful in there appeal.
There is a publication used by the Armed Forces for all their medical standards and yes, it does explain the requirements to assess anxiety.

A-levels, uni, jobs; what you've described is no different to what a lot of people do, but not everyone in thise circumstances has sought treatment for anxiety. In the link above it says that being able to function in normal life does not make you fit to join the military. Some people find even the selection process is stressful, let alone training or doing a job that requires you to have the responsibility of people's lives in your hands. And you'll be trained to carry a weapon and have to be prepared to use it.

There will be people on here that will have failed the medical; some will appeal, not all will be successful. It's all on a case-by-case basis and no 2 people will ever have the same experience, and we don't recommend posting reams of info on here about personal circumstances.
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Surnia
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
If you have the time and determination, I guess you could live a busy, pressurised life, achieve a lot, do thing which demonstrate resilience etc and re-apply in 3-5 years and see if they take a different view then.
Not really. What is achieved by an individual goes on the application to support their selection at interview. A doctor isnt going to write reams on a medical record about what someone has done, and it still comes down to what triggered an episode in the first place, as well as time clear of symptoms and treatment.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Surnia)
Not really. What is achieved by an individual goes on the application to support their selection at interview. A doctor isnt going to write reams on a medical record about what someone has done, and it still comes down to what triggered an episode in the first place, as well as time clear of symptoms and treatment.
Agreed, but the goalposts can move on the interpretation of these things. I think the only hope is time combined with evidence of dealing with high stress, so that's a fast-paced job, being a paramedic or similar, travelling the world on a unicyle etc and then hoping, if within the age groups, and then see if a medical board takes a different view of the individual's resilience. I was clutching at straws of positivity :/
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Kerzen
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(Original post by cxm405)
I have recently been Informed by capita that after consulting my GP report that I have been deemed medically unfit to join the RAF due to anxiety related health issues.

During sixth form I began suffering with anxiety, and was treated for a small period of time beta blockers to alleviate my moderate symptoms. This occurred again when I attended university, and again i was treated for a very small time with beta blockers.

Since then I have not received any therapy or drug based treatments (over 3 years).

According to the appeals process I must provide proof of only one episode, however both treatments were due to academic stress and were only when the symptoms became difficult to deal with. It could be argued that this was an extended episode.
Also, I was Informed by the doctor who completed my initial medical that it depended on the duration of time I "suffered" with the anxiety.

Any advice or encouragement would be greatly appreciated.
How old are you, cxm405?
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