sweetescobar
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I need help understanding why the pressure increases due to the fact that the equilibrium moves toward the molecules with the larger amount of molecules if that makes any sense. Should it not be vice versa
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sweetescobar
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ignore question B
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Pigster
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(Original post by sweetescobar)
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ignore question B
Pressure is caused by molecules bashing into the walls of the containers.

On the left hand side there are three molecules that can band into the walls. On the RHS there are only two molecules, hence less pressure.

If you increase P (e.g. by making the container smaller), then the equilibrium reacts by trying to reduce the pressure and the equilibrium shifts to the RHS.
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lewisli_
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Increasing pressure shifts the equilibrium to the right, in this case, to the side with the fewer gas molecules because if you imagine a making a box smaller, all the particles are closer together and they would want to react to produce fewer molecules in the system to try to counteract the increase in pressure.
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