Will we see more online college/university courses?

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username2816962
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We were told many times by universities that courses cannot be effectively taught and communicated online.... Well, seeing as university exams are going ahead after doing almost an entire terms worth of teaching online, that seems to be a sign they were wrong.

So going forward do you think more university courses will be online based with the possibility for distance learning? I know many universities record their lectures and post them online, so the idea of delivering lectures online after the fact is not new.

I am not suggesting any change, only this virus has got me wondering if such teaching would be possible and if this will be the impetus for such a change.
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Academicbee123
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Durham have already pledged that 25% or more of modules for the class of 2020 will be online, no matter what. They’re working on increasing this percentage for subsequent years. The only exception will be allowing students in for tutorials and lab/practical work.
Unfortunately I’ve already firmed Durham so I’ll probably reject them and try to apply to Bristol or UCL via adjustment. Online lessons don’t suit my style of learning.
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username2816962
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(Original post by Academicbee123)
Durham have already pledged that 25% or more of modules for the class of 2020 will be online, no matter what. They’re working on increasing this percentage for subsequent years. The only exception will be allowing students in for tutorials and lab/practical work.
Unfortunately I’ve already firmed Durham so I’ll probably reject them and try to apply to Bristol or UCL via adjustment. Online lessons don’t suit my style of learning.
Ah yes, I should have clarified that I do not think online classes will completely take over, and certain classes (like tutorials) will still require in person attendance. I also cannot see how you would study any sort of science/art class online in any way.

But as an aside, are you really going to turn down Durham just because they are doing online classes? I mean you do what suits you, but that is one hell of an opportunity you are giving up. As much as a random person online can give advice, I would say have some second thoughts on that....
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Academicbee123
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(Original post by bennyj901)
Ah yes, I should have clarified that I do not think online classes will completely take over, and certain classes (like tutorials) will still require in person attendance. I also cannot see how you would study any sort of science/art class online in any way.

But as an aside, are you really going to turn down Durham just because they are doing online classes? I mean you do what suits you, but that is one hell of an opportunity you are giving up. As much as a random person online can give advice, I would say have some second thoughts on that....
I’m not certain, I really don’t enjoy online lessons but I might regret rejecting them if all universities go down this path anyway. You seem to have a good opinion of Durham, which is refreshing to see on TSR as it gets a lot of hate! I’m just unsure at the moment, but thanks.
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DBR247
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(Original post by bennyj901)
We were told many times by universities that courses cannot be effectively taught and communicated online.... Well, seeing as university exams are going ahead after doing almost an entire terms worth of teaching online, that seems to be a sign they were wrong.

So going forward do you think more university courses will be online based with the possibility for distance learning? I know many universities record their lectures and post them online, so the idea of delivering lectures online after the fact is not new.

I am not suggesting any change, only this virus has got me wondering if such teaching would be possible and if this will be the impetus for such a change.
Distance learning may well become the new norm after this. Universities have already made a shift towards online learning i.e. lectures recorded online, but this pandemic has forced them to digitise all aspects including examinations and tutor meetings. Virtual seminars/teaching will likely become far more normalised after all this. This pandemic has disrupted universities, to innovate more quickly and in many ways that is a positive for students.
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vicvic38
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I'm doing a subject that can basically be done anywhere, all I need is a paper and pen, so I suppose yes?

My course (Mathematics at Oxford) is has a significant online component (kinda) because all the problem sheets and lecture notes are on there, as well as most lectures being recorded. I can basically do my course all online except for 2-3 hours a week of in person time.

I don't like it though. I like sitting in the college library, or the maths institute, and chatting in person to random other people on my course is important.
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username2816962
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(Original post by Academicbee123)
I’m not certain, I really don’t enjoy online lessons but I might regret rejecting them if all universities go down this path anyway. You seem to have a good opinion of Durham, which is refreshing to see on TSR as it gets a lot of hate! I’m just unsure at the moment, but thanks.
It really depends on the course... I study economics and I really see no benefit of learning in person over online and vice versa since it is such a textbook intensive course. I can appreciate how other courses that require more engagement outside a textbook would benefit more from in person learning.

Have you tried any online learning yet? If you just don't like the idea then you should give it a go, I was on the fence about it and I can say that there is very little difference (when it is done right).

And yes, of course i have a high opinion of Durham because I actually appreciate there is such a thing as a good university outside Oxford and Cambridge. Don't let anyone tell you differently.
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username2816962
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(Original post by DBR247)
Distance learning may well become the new norm after this. Universities have already made a shift towards online learning i.e. lectures recorded online, but this pandemic has forced them to digitise all aspects including examinations and tutor meetings. Virtual seminars/teaching will likely become far more normalised after all this. This pandemic has disrupted universities, to innovate more quickly and in many ways that is a positive for students.
I have to say that in my experience the tutorials delivered on Zoom were a bit of a **** up... I do not know if that was just a matter of Zoom not really being a good fit for delivering tutorials, tutors and tutees who didn't know how to use it or if they just require in person attendance but I cannot see them being digitised in the near future. I will say the difference between online and in person lectures was minimal however, and I can see why they can be an alternative to attending lectures in person.
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Academicbee123
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(Original post by bennyj901)
It really depends on the course... I study economics and I really see no benefit of learning in person over online and vice versa since it is such a textbook intensive course. I can appreciate how other courses that require more engagement outside a textbook would benefit more from in person learning.

Have you tried any online learning yet? If you just don't like the idea then you should give it a go, I was on the fence about it and I can say that there is very little difference (when it is done right).

And yes, of course i have a high opinion of Durham because I actually appreciate there is such a thing as a good university outside Oxford and Cambridge. Don't let anyone tell you differently.
I have had a few weeks of online lessons with my sixth form and I found it so difficult to concentrate and remain focused. I need face to face interaction to feel motivated. I’ve also applied for biology, which needs labs.
Thank you for the encouragement! It’s good to hear that some people like Durham
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username2816962
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(Original post by Academicbee123)
I have had a few weeks of online lessons with my sixth form and I found it so difficult to concentrate and remain focused. I need face to face interaction to feel motivated. I’ve also applied for biology, which needs labs.
Thank you for the encouragement! It’s good to hear that some people like Durham
Ah... Well since you have applied for biology I can understand... I am sure universities have found a way to teach this online but unlike subjects like economics, law, maths, english etc, I really can't see how you will get the full experience by learning online.

That said, I still wouldn't write off Durham completely... It is not just 'some people' who like it, do not get stuck in the TSR bubble of 'Oxbridge or GTFO'
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username4867806
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(Original post by bennyj901)
Ah yes, I should have clarified that I do not think online classes will completely take over, and certain classes (like tutorials) will still require in person attendance. I also cannot see how you would study any sort of science/art class online in any way.

But as an aside, are you really going to turn down Durham just because they are doing online classes? I mean you do what suits you, but that is one hell of an opportunity you are giving up. As much as a random person online can give advice, I would say have some second thoughts on that....
I've already rejected Durham due to getting an offer from St Andrews, however, I would have also rejected Durham for this. There's quite a bit on twitter showing how they haven't consulted staff or students about it. I would go to university for the experience - not to sit in front of a screen the entire time.
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Academicbee123
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(Original post by Treetop321)
I've already rejected Durham due to getting an offer from St Andrews, however, I would have also rejected Durham for this. There's quite a bit on twitter showing how they haven't consulted staff or students about it. I would go to university for the experience - not to sit in front of a screen the entire time.
I wish I hadn’t firmed them Durham have really gone about this in the wrong way. I honestly don’t know what to do - I might be ringing up a lot of universities on results day.
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londonmyst
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Yes, I think so.
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username2816962
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(Original post by Academicbee123)
I wish I hadn’t firmed them Durham have really gone about this in the wrong way. I honestly don’t know what to do - I might be ringing up a lot of universities on results day.
Well I will say that if you are getting offers from UCL, SA, Durham, Bristol you are clearly a good student who will get good results.

If you have the qualifications (which I am sure you will have), there is nothing at all wrong with taking a year off to have a proper think about what university you want to go to, get some work experience and just develop more as a person before going to university.

No university will hold that against you, and honestly the only entry requirements we have in this country (unlike others like the USA) is the A level grades you get, so you can apply in 5 years from now provided you have the grades.

Just another thing to think about.
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username4867806
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Yes, I think so.
There doesn't seem to be much support for it from staff or students. Why implement something no one seems to want?
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username2816962
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Yes, I think so.
Good or bad?
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Lemur14
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(Original post by Academicbee123)
Durham have already pledged that 25% or more of modules for the class of 2020 will be online, no matter what. They’re working on increasing this percentage for subsequent years. The only exception will be allowing students in for tutorials and lab/practical work.
Unfortunately I’ve already firmed Durham so I’ll probably reject them and try to apply to Bristol or UCL via adjustment. Online lessons don’t suit my style of learning.
That's not it...they've said about 25% of modules will be cut for at least the next academic year to allow for staff to focus on making the remaining modules possible to deliver online (something very important in the current climate!). 8 courses will be available as online only, this is nothing like 25% of modules!
Also note you can't go through adjustment if you haven't got a firm place, it would be clearing.
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Academicbee123
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(Original post by bennyj901)
Well I will say that if you are getting offers from UCL, SA, Durham, Bristol you are clearly a good student who will get good results.

If you have the qualifications (which I am sure you will have), there is nothing at all wrong with taking a year off to have a proper think about what university you want to go to, get some work experience and just develop more as a person before going to university.

No university will hold that against you, and honestly the only entry requirements we have in this country (unlike others like the USA) is the A level grades you get, so you can apply in 5 years from now provided you have the grades.

Just another thing to think about.
Thank you, that’s very encouraging.
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Academicbee123
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(Original post by Lemur14)
That's not it...they've said about 25% of modules will be cut for at least the next academic year to allow for staff to focus on making the remaining modules possible to deliver online (something very important in the current climate!). 8 courses will be available as online only, this is nothing like 25% of modules!
Also note you can't go through adjustment if you haven't got a firm place, it would be clearing.
I have a firm place?
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Lemur14
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(Original post by Academicbee123)
I have a firm place?
You said you were planning on rejecting them?
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