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Hey, I'm currently in year 12 studying A-level politics. Right now I'm working around a Grade B level. However, I really want an A/A* in the end so aside from practicing essays. Does anyone have any advice on how to make efficient revision notes? Thanks.
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PetitePanda
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Hi, I moved your thread to a more specific forum hopefully, people with more knowledge will see this better
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
Hi, I moved your thread to a more specific forum hopefully, people with more knowledge will see this better
Oh okay, thank you.
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Azara.d
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The main thing that separates A and B students in a level politics is your essay technique. I know you said aside from essays but it is really important to have a good structure in your essays. If you read an A* essay you will notice that the language is more advanced and concise and the essay is free flowing. For a level politics, examiners really want to see a lot of AO3 as last year, they commented on the lack of it in student's papers. As an A student myself, i would recommend structuring your essays to always include your argument/point and counter-argument/point in the SAME paragraph. What i mean by this is start your paragraph explaining your point then add you evidence and analyse the evidence, then you need to come to a concise judgement eg. this argument is significant/considerable because...therefore OR when evaluated it is clear that this argument is limited because.... I would recommend starting your paragraph with the argument you DO NOT agree with this because then you can evaluate it and say something like " however, although this argument is significant/this argument is weak because it must be considered that *insert the beginning of your counter argument here*. and that will mean you end the paragraph strongly by clearly explaining your argument and evaluate it at the end saying you think it is a considerable argument while linking it back to the question aswell.

This is a paragraph from my essay on social factor affecting voting behaviour, it isnt the best paragraph and is taken from an essay i wrote in my mock exam that got me 28/30, this is my own knowledge etc but it shows what i was talking about earlier:

one could argue that a social factor, social class remains the most important factor affecting voting behaviour in the UK due to the fact that over the years there has been a sustained and consistent pattern of class-based voting. Research has continuously suggested that voters in lower social classes such as D/E were more likely to vote Labour while the A/B electorates were more likely to consistently vote Conservative. This was evident in the 2019 general election in which 47% of D/E social class voted Labour while 47% of voters in A/B chose Conservative. This could be due to the historic difference in party policies as Conservatives traditionally favour reduced benefit support and low taxes. These policies are more likely to resonate 3with the wealthier classes A and B because they are less reliant on the state and want to keep as much of their income as possible. Contrastingly, Labour favour policies that redistribute wealth and budget more spending toward the welfare state. These policies would appeal to the poorer social classes such as D and E who would need more support from the state. However, this argument is weak because political scientists argue that the lines between class and party preference has diminished due to modern society meaning that people are less easily identifiable in lass terms. Furthermore, in the 2019 general election, the Conservatives comfortably outperformed Labour across all social classes with 48% of C2/D/E voters choosing Conservatives; evidence that class is no longer a key indicator of how people vote. Therefore, It must be considered that people are no longer identifiable in class terms and traditional class divides no longer confirm party preferences. The traditional working class has declined with over 50% of the voters found in service industries with weaker trade unions as opposed to previous workers being employed in heavy industry with harsh working conditions. This increased standards of living and quality of life has led many in C2 to think of themselves as middle class. This has arguably led to an expansion of the middle class which has meant that it is now difficult to split the middle class into C/D/E as society fits a more A/B/C structure. This idea of social dealignment is a strong argument because it describes how the social classes are voting in fewer numbers than they traditionally use to and disproves the idea of a long term factor still holding prominence and importance in determining voting behaviour.

Hope this helped!
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(Original post by Azara.d)
The main thing that separates A and B students in a level politics is your essay technique. I know you said aside from essays but it is really important to have a good structure in your essays. If you read an A* essay you will notice that the language is more advanced and concise and the essay is free flowing. For a level politics, examiners really want to see a lot of AO3 as last year, they commented on the lack of it in student's papers. As an A student myself, i would recommend structuring your essays to always include your argument/point and counter-argument/point in the SAME paragraph. What i mean by this is start your paragraph explaining your point then add you evidence and analyse the evidence, then you need to come to a concise judgement eg. this argument is significant/considerable because...therefore OR when evaluated it is clear that this argument is limited because.... I would recommend starting your paragraph with the argument you DO NOT agree with this because then you can evaluate it and say something like " however, although this argument is significant/this argument is weak because it must be considered that *insert the beginning of your counter argument here*. and that will mean you end the paragraph strongly by clearly explaining your argument and evaluate it at the end saying you think it is a considerable argument while linking it back to the question aswell.

This is a paragraph from my essay on social factor affecting voting behaviour, it isnt the best paragraph and is taken from an essay i wrote in my mock exam that got me 28/30, this is my own knowledge etc but it shows what i was talking about earlier:

one could argue that a social factor, social class remains the most important factor affecting voting behaviour in the UK due to the fact that over the years there has been a sustained and consistent pattern of class-based voting. Research has continuously suggested that voters in lower social classes such as D/E were more likely to vote Labour while the A/B electorates were more likely to consistently vote Conservative. This was evident in the 2019 general election in which 47% of D/E social class voted Labour while 47% of voters in A/B chose Conservative. This could be due to the historic difference in party policies as Conservatives traditionally favour reduced benefit support and low taxes. These policies are more likely to resonate 3with the wealthier classes A and B because they are less reliant on the state and want to keep as much of their income as possible. Contrastingly, Labour favour policies that redistribute wealth and budget more spending toward the welfare state. These policies would appeal to the poorer social classes such as D and E who would need more support from the state. However, this argument is weak because political scientists argue that the lines between class and party preference has diminished due to modern society meaning that people are less easily identifiable in lass terms. Furthermore, in the 2019 general election, the Conservatives comfortably outperformed Labour across all social classes with 48% of C2/D/E voters choosing Conservatives; evidence that class is no longer a key indicator of how people vote. Therefore, It must be considered that people are no longer identifiable in class terms and traditional class divides no longer confirm party preferences. The traditional working class has declined with over 50% of the voters found in service industries with weaker trade unions as opposed to previous workers being employed in heavy industry with harsh working conditions. This increased standards of living and quality of life has led many in C2 to think of themselves as middle class. This has arguably led to an expansion of the middle class which has meant that it is now difficult to split the middle class into C/D/E as society fits a more A/B/C structure. This idea of social dealignment is a strong argument because it describes how the social classes are voting in fewer numbers than they traditionally use to and disproves the idea of a long term factor still holding prominence and importance in determining voting behaviour.

Hope this helped!
Thank you for your advice, practicing and securing a good essay technique is very important I will do more of this.
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