nabz1231
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#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hey guys can we have a debate ish with detail reply on this
covid 19
Last edited by nabz1231; 2 years ago
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Kallisto
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#2
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These things are important in my opinion:

- Scientists/doctors understand how the virus works.

- Better understanding helps in releasing an effective antidote.

- Antidotes help to treat with the virus better.

- Scientists/doctors learn how the virus is caused.

- When they understand how the virus is caused, they know how to prevent.

- Prevention helps to take care for yourself and people in surrounding.
Last edited by Kallisto; 2 years ago
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nabz1231
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#3
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#3
Ah thank you. If you were to write an essay how would you section it, I’m trying to keep minimal headings?
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Kallisto
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#4
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#4
When it is jsut about the headings: use short but clear words, as in 'The importance of studying viruses'.

To section the essay, you can write about the viruses first, so what people and especially experts know about them. You can even make a reference to Covid-19 and the crisis at the moment getting started with your essay to write about your points!
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nabz1231
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#5
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#5
Thank you
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HarisMalik98
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#6
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#6
Some pointers:

- Viruses are constantly evolving, scientists need to keep up surveillance on new strains and divergence from the WT in order to predict outbreaks of novel strains.

- Treatments aren't necessarily cures. Especially for viral illnesses, where there is a distinct lack of treatment options compared to bacterial illnesses, treatments are often not 100% effective. Further study of the viruses will lead to better drug target options.

- Vaccines typically take a while to manufacture, and that's on top of the years spent formulating and trialing them. Vaccination is prophylactic, i.e. aims to prevent disease (as opposed to cure it). Hence, vaccination is the most effective strategy to lower the burden of viral diseases (and strain on the healthcare sector). Studying the virus even after effective antivirals will allow time to design vaccines for future use.

- If zoonotic, sequencing allows epidemiologists to establish the natural reservoirs of infection, intermediate hosts and common emergence routes. This will allow better prevention....e.g. by vaccinating the natural reservoir and intermediate hosts, or by public awareness and infrastructure to lower the chances of people coming into contact with these reservoirs.

- To understand how the virus causes pathology. Sometimes we have effective antivirals against the virus, but don't necessarily fully understand how the virus causes pathology in the host. Further study to understand this allows us to further develop our knowledge of virology and allows scientists to draw parallels with how other viruses cause disease; allowing them to know what targets to focus research on.

- To understand the genetic basis of disease. Further study of the virus could lead to understanding if certain genetic traits leave certain people predisposed to the virus, and evaluate risks.

- Biowarfare. Although not great to think about; mutagenesis of certain viruses could cause novel strains that are lethal in humans. Army-based scientists (in particular) need to be aware of the full structure and function of such viruses in order to prepare for any such events.

A Couple of Experimental Reasons:

- Virotherapy. This ones dependant on the virus. But much research is being done currently to genetically modify pre-existing viruses to infect certain cell types. E.g. many groups are trying to produce effective oncolytic viruses; viruses that are modified to only infect tumour cells whilst not infecting healthy tissues (effectively removing the tumour).

- As gene delivery systems. Like virotherapy, research is being done to engineer viruses that can deliver genes into host cells. This mimics a natural infection route, but shouldn't cause disease. This could be effective for treating people with certain genetic diseases.

Hope this helps, I doubt you'll need to mention them all. You can try group certain ones under a unified heading as many are related to each other.
Last edited by HarisMalik98; 2 years ago
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nabz1231
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#7
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#7
(Original post by HarisMalik98)
Some pointers:

- Viruses are constantly evolving, scientists need to keep up surveillance on new strains and divergence from the WT in order to predict outbreaks of novel strains.

- Treatments aren't necessarily cures. Especially for viral illnesses, where there is a distinct lack of treatment options compared to bacterial illnesses, treatments are often not 100% effective. Further study of the viruses will lead to better drug target options.

- Vaccines typically take a while to manufacture, and that's on top of the years spent formulating and trialing them. Vaccination is prophylactic, i.e. aims to prevent disease (as opposed to cure it). Hence, vaccination is the most effective strategy to lower the burden of viral diseases (and strain on the healthcare sector). Studying the virus even after effective antivirals will allow time to design vaccines for future use.

- If zoonotic, sequencing allows epidemiologists to establish the natural reservoirs of infection, intermediate hosts and common emergence routes. This will allow better prevention....e.g. by vaccinating the natural reservoir and intermediate hosts, or by public awareness and infrastructure to lower the chances of people coming into contact with these reservoirs.

- To understand how the virus causes pathology. Sometimes we have effective antivirals against the virus, but don't necessarily fully understand how the virus causes pathology in the host. Further study to understand this allows us to further develop our knowledge of virology and allows scientists to draw parallels with how other viruses cause disease; allowing them to know what targets to focus research on.

- To understand the genetic basis of disease. Further study of the virus could lead to understanding if certain genetic traits leave certain people predisposed to the virus, and evaluate risks.

- Biowarfare. Although not great to think about; mutagenesis of certain viruses could cause novel strains that are lethal in humans. Army-based scientists (in particular) need to be aware of the full structure and function of such viruses in order to prepare for any such events.

A Couple of Experimental Reasons:

- Virotherapy. This ones dependant on the virus. But much research is being done currently to genetically modify pre-existing viruses to infect certain cell types. E.g. many groups are trying to produce effective oncolytic viruses; viruses that are modified to only infect tumour cells whilst not infecting healthy tissues (effectively removing the tumour).

- As gene delivery systems. Like virotherapy, research is being done to engineer viruses that can deliver genes into host cells. This mimics a natural infection route, but shouldn't cause disease. This could be effective for treating people with certain genetic diseases.

Hope this helps, I doubt you'll need to mention them all. You can try group certain ones under a unified heading as many are related to each other.
Ah brilliant thank you so much
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