aos.96
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Possible ways to increase my income during those years?
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nexttime
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Why would you need to? Most people are going from student living on like £8k per year to a post-tax income of something like 22k. Most people find they are flush with cash.

But I guess the medicine - specific answer here is locums. There is a maximum amount you can do though, ,and in F1 both options and rate of pay are not great.

Otherwise win the lottery? Start a religion? I dunno.
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Helenia
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Become a YouTube/Insta/TikTok/ whatever star?

Or just enjoy earning a proper salary for the first time.
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panda1093
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You'll have plenty of opportunities to Locum as an F1/F2But keep in mind that as an F1 you can only Locum for your own trust and the rate can be as low as £20/hour so...it might not be worth it. It's trust-dependent though.Other opportunities include: tutoring, maybe teaching opportunities especially if you have relevant experience, anything entrepreneurial e.g. someone I know makes art that they then sell on Etsy.If you're saving money for a specific reason e.g. deposit for a house, you could look at cutting down on your expenses rather than making extra money with locums (or do both). Finally, make sure you keep your money in a savings account that gets you a decent interest rate
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MKaur18
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(Original post by aos.96)
Possible ways to increase my income during those years?
Tutor/teach xx
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Dr_Bodkin_Adams
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I've locumed throughout this year and am on course to have made £60,000 as an FY2. That's through the trust, I've not heard of a foundation trainee locuming through an agency.
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(Original post by Dr_Bodkin_Adams)
I've locumed throughout this year and am on course to have made £60,000 as an FY2. That's through the trust, I've not heard of a foundation trainee locuming through an agency.
That's nuts. Did you do every extra shift available?
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nexttime
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(Original post by Dr_Bodkin_Adams)
I've locumed throughout this year and am on course to have made £60,000 as an FY2. That's through the trust, I've not heard of a foundation trainee locuming through an agency.
So you're technically not meant to break the 56 hours per week rule IIRC, plus have to stick to things like consecutive days working rules and minimum rest rules... have you been naughty?

You must have worked a lot of hours though well done.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Anonymous)
That's nuts. Did you do every extra shift available?
Why do you think its nuts? Most DGHs I've been at have had huge numbers of locum shifts available with all the rota gaps, that doesn't surprise me at all. Now its a bit borderline if you're sticking to 56 hours, but if we're pushing to the limits and somehow it works out with the rest rules its feasible.

You're probably getting £42k from normal FY2 wage, and the remaining £18k at say £50 per hour is 360 hours or 30 12 hour on call shifts. So you're volunteering to do almost alternate weekends plus some evenings, basically.

Its pushing the rest rules but in terms of shift availability, easy.
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Mutleybm1996
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(Original post by nexttime)
So you're technically not meant to break the 56 hours per week rule IIRC, plus have to stick to things like consecutive days working rules and minimum rest rules... have you been naughty?

You must have worked a lot of hours though well done.
I’m starting F1 in a few months, is there somewhere that sets these rules out really simply? (The contract is a little confusing!)
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nexttime
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(Original post by Mutleybm1996)
I’m starting F1 in a few months, is there somewhere that sets these rules out really simply? (The contract is a little confusing!)
Google tells me yes

https://www.nhsemployers.org/-/media...00989A95B89B73
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asif007
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Aside from locum work on top of your normal hours, making investments and owning a small business are the most reliable ways of increasing your income. If you have some capital saved up already, look into property: buy to let and/or flipping them for profit. If you do tuition, look into scaling it up so you can work with lots of paying students instead of one or two at a time. I knew a guy who converted a room in his house into a classroom for 20 students and made consistent money enough to give up his full time job. Do small side hustles like taking payment for DIY at neighbours’ houses, cutting grass etc. I don’t know if the rules are the same now but there used to be extra payment for teachers invigilating exams or marking SATs and GCSE papers - there may be something similar for tutors or medically trained people. There’s so many options out there. I suggest you google something along the lines of “how to supplement income as a doctor” - lots of ideas and tips from other people. Good Luck!
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nexttime
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(Original post by asif007)
Do small side hustles like taking payment for DIY at neighbours’ houses, cutting grass etc. I don’t know if the rules are the same now but there used to be extra payment for teachers invigilating exams or marking SATs and GCSE papers - there may be something similar for tutors or medically trained people.
I mean, when you can locum for £50 per hour from year 2, do you really think it would be worth it for a doctor to cut a neighbour's grass? How costly is this lawn lol.

I also can't really see a doctor having the time to set up effectively a private school just alongside normal work. The irregular hours alone will annoy your clients. However, it is true that you can now go part time to support alternative ventures so not impossible.
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asif007
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(Original post by nexttime)
I mean, when you can locum for £50 per hour from year 2, do you really think it would be worth it for a doctor to cut a neighbour's grass? How costly is this lawn lol.

I also can't really see a doctor having the time to set up effectively a private school just alongside normal work. The irregular hours alone will annoy your clients. However, it is true that you can now go part time to support alternative ventures so not impossible.
I didn’t say trade one for the other. Do a lawn in 2-3 hours before or after a 12 hour locum shift. Take a bit of money for the time and be on your way. Every little helps.
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nexttime
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(Original post by asif007)
I didn’t say trade one for the other. Do a lawn in 2-3 hours before or after a 12 hour locum shift. Take a bit of money for the time and be on your way. Every little helps.
Lol, I guess.

Don't forget to declare your £20 to HMRC so they can take half of it away!
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by nexttime)
Why would you need to? Most people are going from student living on like £8k per year to a post-tax income of something like 22k. Most people find they are flush with cash.

But I guess the medicine - specific answer here is locums. There is a maximum amount you can do though, ,and in F1 both options and rate of pay are not great.

Otherwise win the lottery? Start a religion? I dunno.
Rather presumptive and/or short sighted. 9k / year tuition fees + student loan for living expenses means you can graduate quite easily with 60k of debt, with interest accruing at over 5% annually. OP (or people like them) will also most likely be one of the only 17% of students to pay back their loans in full link. Add professional fees in too.

I certainly do not envy medics post-2012 tuition fee hike that's for sure!
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Democracy
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(Original post by asif007)
I didn’t say trade one for the other. Do a lawn in 2-3 hours before or after a 12 hour locum shift. Take a bit of money for the time and be on your way. Every little helps.
Lol wut. Mowing lawns as a "side hustle"? That's what a 14-year-old does to generate extra pocket money not what you do as a doctor between on-calls
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asif007
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(Original post by nexttime)
Lol, I guess.

Don't forget to declare your £20 to HMRC so they can take half of it away!
Haha, indeed.

(Original post by Democracy)
Lol wut. Mowing lawns as a "side hustle"? That's what a 14-year-old does to generate extra pocket money not what you do as a doctor between on-calls
It doesn’t necessarily have to be mowing lawns. The point here is the side hustle, I was just giving an example (clearly a bad one). I’m an advocate for doctors using whatever skills they have to make money on the side: it can be whatever you want it to be and largely depends on the individual.
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Democracy
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(Original post by asif007)
Haha, indeed.



It doesn’t necessarily have to be mowing lawns. The point here is the side hustle, I was just giving an example (clearly a bad one). I’m an advocate for doctors using whatever skills they have to make money on the side: it can be whatever you want it to be and largely depends on the individual.
Yeah but "side hustles" that are in keeping with your high level of qualification and professional training - not just dabbling in the gig economy for the sake of it. I can't imagine for a second anyone suggesting that a trainee barrister start doing odd jobs for £20 in between court appearances so what's different here?

Not to mention, surely it's unfair to the people who rely on invigilating, marking exams, gardening, odd jobs, etc for a doctor to be taking those jobs?

Unless you have a weirdly extravagant lifestyle surely an FY1 salary is fine for most people and once you've gained your full registration locuming is the sensible thing to do. Once CCT'd and depending on specialty I think "side hustles" become a lot more variable and lucrative
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nexttime
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Rather presumptive and/or short sighted. 9k / year tuition fees + student loan for living expenses means you can graduate quite easily with 60k of debt, with interest accruing at over 5% annually. OP (or people like them) will also most likely be one of the only 17% of students to pay back their loans in full link. Add professional fees in too.

I certainly do not envy medics post-2012 tuition fee hike that's for sure!
Erm, sure. So they'll lose 9% of their income over £21k for either 20 years or 30 years... don't think that impacts on the truth of my statement though! You can focus on arguably the worst year of your medical career instead if you want!
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