What to do in the summer before college

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LovingLucy
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Hey guys so I’m going to start a levels in September and obviously we have a lot of time on our hands. Is it worth looking into a level content? What should I be doing? How do I get organised for college? Any tips or advice?

Thank you
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peach927
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Hi,
I'd say look into volunteering, even online opportunities can really help expand your skill base. As well as general research into subjects your interested in. As college can be quite fast paced and overwhelming. Its useful to have some idea, a rough career area you would be involved in e.g healthcare, not essential but helps.

All the best.
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parmezanne
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I mean, you can start the course if you really want to. It's not a bad idea to fill your time by getting a headstart. Find out what textbooks you need and start learning key words or concepts, it will put you in good stead and make you look super dedicated.
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PetitePanda
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If you are super super bored then go for it. What A levels do you do?
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by yzanne)
I mean, you can start the course if you really want to. It's not a bad idea to fill your time by getting a headstart. Find out what textbooks you need and start learning key words or concepts, it will put you in good stead and make you look super dedicated.
I really dont recommend getting textbooks until you get into yr 12
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LovingLucy
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
If you are super super bored then go for it. What A levels do you do?
Psychology, combined English and ancient histiry
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by LovingLucy)
Psychology, combined English and ancient histiry
For Psychology, look at the specification and read around the topics for it or watch some youtube videos around it. For combined English idk what you learn but I assume you will analyse some books - Could you give me some details on what you learn? For ancient history, watch some documentaries or youtube videos to give you a rough overview of the topics
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LovingLucy
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
For Psychology, look at the specification and read around the topics for it or watch some youtube videos around it. For combined English idk what you learn but I assume you will analyse some books - Could you give me some details on what you learn? For ancient history, watch some documentaries or youtube videos to give you a rough overview of the topics
apply literary and linguistic analytical techniques to poetry, plays and novels, as well as to non-literary texts such as transcripts of conversations. As well as writing critically, you will get opportunities to write creative pieces in response to the texts you study.

Some of these approaches will be familiar, for example studying a writer’s choice of vocabulary. Some of these, such as placing a focus on grammar and syntax or the study of pragmatics (what texts really mean in their context) will be new. The course places an emphasis on spoken as well as written texts.
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by LovingLucy)
apply literary and linguistic analytical techniques to poetry, plays and novels, as well as to non-literary texts such as transcripts of conversations. As well as writing critically, you will get opportunities to write creative pieces in response to the texts you study.

Some of these approaches will be familiar, for example studying a writer’s choice of vocabulary. Some of these, such as placing a focus on grammar and syntax or the study of pragmatics (what texts really mean in their context) will be new. The course places an emphasis on spoken as well as written texts.
I suggest you read the texts you'll study and research its contextual history to understand it better
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LovingLucy
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(Original post by LovingLucy)
apply literary and linguistic analytical techniques to poetry, plays and novels, as well as to non-literary texts such as transcripts of conversations. As well as writing critically, you will get opportunities to write creative pieces in response to the texts you study.

Some of these approaches will be familiar, for example studying a writer’s choice of vocabulary. Some of these, such as placing a focus on grammar and syntax or the study of pragmatics (what texts really mean in their context) will be new. The course places an emphasis on spoken as well as written texts.
(Original post by PetitePanda)
I suggest you read the texts you'll study and research its contextual history to understand it better
Thank you so much for the advice
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parmezanne
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
I really dont recommend getting textbooks until you get into yr 12
why not? they've got nothing better to do?
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by yzanne)
why not? they've got nothing better to do?
Because they could be given it to them or have the resources in school and they could get the wrong textbooks or the ones that’s doesn’t have enough detail in. Plus if they’ve got nothing better to do, they can brush up on their gcse material and use free resources like YouTube videos and websites to go through. What if you buy a textbook start going through it and don’t like the subject or don’t like the subject when you get into yr 12 and you’ve wasted like £20-30 because the good textbooks aren’t cheap? My friend choose chemistry but hated it and dropped it in like 3/4 months in (luckily she got given a chemistry book by the school so she didn’t need to pay for it). If OP doing essay subject, then the textbooks will need to have a lot of information if she’s going to rely on it solely so it will be expensive. A good textbook for history I know at least is the Oxford AQA Tudors AS and A level and that’s £28. Again she could get the wrong textbooks and get CGP although a good revision guide, it’s only a good revision guide - there’s no point learning it from there since a. Not enough information and b. It’s for revision. Or op could get **** books like some AQA endorses ones where it’s only good when you have the resources are given by the teacher like end of chapter mark schemes or they don’t explain how to get to the question and you get given some resources to explain it to you. Honestly, I would wait till you’re in yr 12 to get books because you have fully tasted the subject to continue it till yr 13 and OP can use free resources to try to understand A level content, even though she doesn’t need to and will have a hard time doing without a teacher.
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LovingLucy
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
Because they could be given it to them or have the resources in school and they could get the wrong textbooks or the ones that’s doesn’t have enough detail in. Plus if they’ve got nothing better to do, they can brush up on their gcse material and use free resources like YouTube videos and websites to go through. What if you buy a textbook start going through it and don’t like the subject or don’t like the subject when you get into yr 12 and you’ve wasted like £20-30 because the good textbooks aren’t cheap? My friend choose chemistry but hated it and dropped it in like 3/4 months in (luckily she got given a chemistry book by the school so she didn’t need to pay for it). If OP doing essay subject, then the textbooks will need to have a lot of information if she’s going to rely on it solely so it will be expensive. A good textbook for history I know at least is the Oxford AQA Tudors AS and A level and that’s £28. Again she could get the wrong textbooks and get CGP although a good revision guide, it’s only a good revision guide - there’s no point learning it from there since a. Not enough information and b. It’s for revision. Or op could get **** books like some AQA endorses ones where it’s only good when you have the resources are given by the teacher like end of chapter mark schemes or they don’t explain how to get to the question and you get given some resources to explain it to you. Honestly, I would wait till you’re in yr 12 to get books because you have fully tasted the subject to continue it till yr 13 and OP can use free resources to try to understand A level content, even though she doesn’t need to and will have a hard time doing without a teacher.
I probably won’t get the textbook
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