Going vegan

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CCUupcake123
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I’ve been really into working out recently with all this time on my hands and due to this I’ve been looking into becoming vegan but I would just like to hear some personal views to help me decide for sure

So I was wondering if anyone on here would recommend becoming vegan and what are the benefits in ur personal opinion have u noticed any differences like in your skin, health,body,mood etc I just would like to hear personal opinions rather than scripted views of veganism that’s y I came to student room

Oh and btw I’m not wanting to turn vegan to lose weight I acc want to maintain my wait and instead of losing it become more toned. Do u think it would be suitable for me?

Thank you!
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by CCUupcake123)
I’ve been really into working out recently with all this time on my hands and due to this I’ve been looking into becoming vegan but I would just like to hear some personal views to help me decide for sure

So I was wondering if anyone on here would recommend becoming vegan and what are the benefits in ur personal opinion have u noticed any differences like in your skin, health,body,mood etc I just would like to hear personal opinions rather than scripted views of veganism that’s y I came to student room

Oh and btw I’m not wanting to turn vegan to lose weight I acc want to maintain my wait and instead of losing it become more toned. Do u think it would be suitable for me?

Thank you!
There is no health benefit to going vegan. Actually there are a few drawbacks such as:
- Harder to get Vitamin B12
- Harder to get iron
- Harder to get protein
- Need to vary protein sources to ensure you get good amounts of all amino acids.
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NancarrowSunset
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My sister is a vegan, and in some ways it has been positive for her, but other ways there has been some issues that came with it.

I think there is a lot to think about when you become a vegan. Are you someone who isn't very fussy and would be happy to try new foods? You would obviously have to eat the meat substitutes. You also have the issue of getting far less protein and dairy in your diet, which could potentially cause many health issues. My sister ended up low on vitamin B12 and vitamin D, as well as losing a lot of weight because she didn't do it right. I would recommend taking extra vitamins if you are planning to go vegan, seeing as you will be losing a lot of them from the food you will no longer be eating. You also need to remember that being a vegan can be expensive - the decent substitutes for protein and meat, and dairy, can be very expensive to buy.

I want to stress again - if you are becoming vegan, please please please keep and eye on your vitamin levels, especially B12. B12 deficiency is an awful condition - it runs in my family and can cause you to have seizures, episodes of paralysis, depression and anxiety, hand tremors, mood swings - and those are just a few of the symptoms.

In terms of your fitness, it may help you feel more energised through eating more fresh food like vegetables and meat alternatives, but keep in mind that in order to ensure you maintain weight and don't lose it, you must keep count of how many calories you are putting in your body and ensure that you don't burn to many off.

Becoming vegan works brilliantly for some people, but you must ensure it is the right thing for you.

Hope this helps
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elephantblue
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Hi! I’ve been a vegan for 3 years this September. It’s such a wonderful thing to do for your body, and such a good way to encourage yourself to be so much more adventurous with food.

Where, ordinarily, you might look to things like cheese to flavour certain dishes for instance, you start to view food in an entirely different way. Your relationship to food changes. You appreciate the bounty of natural sources of protein, fibre, vitamins, that we take for granted. If you have a balanced diet, are generally healthy ( assuming you have no natural deficiencies ) you’ll be grand as a vegan. If you want any tips, feel free to drop me a message!
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KatheO11
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(Original post by CCUupcake123)
I’ve been really into working out recently with all this time on my hands and due to this I’ve been looking into becoming vegan but I would just like to hear some personal views to help me decide for sure

So I was wondering if anyone on here would recommend becoming vegan and what are the benefits in ur personal opinion have u noticed any differences like in your skin, health,body,mood etc I just would like to hear personal opinions rather than scripted views of veganism that’s y I came to student room

Oh and btw I’m not wanting to turn vegan to lose weight I acc want to maintain my wait and instead of losing it become more toned. Do u think it would be suitable for me?

Thank you!
Being Vegan has very strong health benefits and people who say otherwise don't knowledge themselves in as such.

"There is no health benefit to going vegan. Actually there are a few drawbacks such as"
- Harder to get Vitamin B12

yes, B-12 is one of the supplementary things but if you have a nice balanced vegan diet, taking a B-12 spray or one pill a day isn't an issue. Most people who worry about B-12 forget that it's only in meat and fish and not everyone eats these things everyday. regular upkeep will be no issue.


- Harder to get iron
False. These are some foods that are very iron-rich and are plant-based : legumes (such as lentils, beans and chickpeas)
firm tofu, tempeh, pumpkin seeds (pepitas) and sunflower seeds, nuts, especially cashews and almonds
wholegrain cereals such as oats or muesli, wholemeal bread, brown rice, amaranth and quinoa
dried apricots, vegetables such as kale, broccoli, spinach and green peas dried apricots etc. Also the benefits of having plant based foods is that you have added benefits such as vitamin C, K , folate, manganese, healthy fats etc. Plus, no issue with worrying about cholesterol or saturated fats and things that will eventually clog your arteries.

- Harder to get protein

the same foods that i listed in the iron section also have a sufficient amount of protein, predominantly tofu, tempeh and seitan (if you don't want to have excess soy).

- Need to vary protein sources to ensure you get good amounts of all amino acids.

Why is this an issue? varying different sources of foods to get similar nutrients is good and creates variety. These are examples of vegan friendly food groups that contain the essential amino acids.

Lysine is in soy, black beans, quinoa, and pumpkin seeds.
nuts, seeds, and whole grains contain large amounts of histidine.
Cottage cheese and wheat germ contain high quantities of threonine.
Methionine is in, grains, nuts, and seeds.
Valine is in soy, peanuts, mushrooms, whole grains, and vegetables.
Isoleucine is plentiful in lentils, nuts, and seeds.
, soy, beans, and legumes are sources of leucine.
Phenylalanine is in soy, beans, and nuts.
Tryptophan is in most high-protein foods, including wheat germ etc.

A positive about being a vegan is that you learn how to cook better because you learn to experiment and try new recipes that look just as good and even better than those with animal products and get that same satisfaction. the more fruits, veg, nuts grains, tofu, etc you incorporate with such an active lifestyle, it's proven that you will be healthier. If you miss things such as cheese, chocolate, ice cream etc, there are alternatives and they are a bit more costly, but the reality is it will make you want to find/make healthier versions and if not, you see them as treat.
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Obolinda
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I've been vegan for a few years and have honestly seen no difference in my health. abstaining from consuming animal products does not guarantee any magical health benefits
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by KatheO11)
Being Vegan has very strong health benefits and people who say otherwise don't knowledge themselves in as such.

"There is no health benefit to going vegan. Actually there are a few drawbacks such as"
- Harder to get Vitamin B12

yes, B-12 is one of the supplementary things but if you have a nice balanced vegan diet, taking a B-12 spray or one pill a day isn't an issue. Most people who worry about B-12 forget that it's only in meat and fish and not everyone eats these things everyday. regular upkeep will be no issue.


- Harder to get iron
False. These are some foods that are very iron-rich and are plant-based : legumes (such as lentils, beans and chickpeas)
firm tofu, tempeh, pumpkin seeds (pepitas) and sunflower seeds, nuts, especially cashews and almonds
wholegrain cereals such as oats or muesli, wholemeal bread, brown rice, amaranth and quinoa
dried apricots, vegetables such as kale, broccoli, spinach and green peas dried apricots etc. Also the benefits of having plant based foods is that you have added benefits such as vitamin C, K , folate, manganese, healthy fats etc. Plus, no issue with worrying about cholesterol or saturated fats and things that will eventually clog your arteries.

- Harder to get protein

the same foods that i listed in the iron section also have a sufficient amount of protein, predominantly tofu, tempeh and seitan (if you don't want to have excess soy).

- Need to vary protein sources to ensure you get good amounts of all amino acids.

Why is this an issue? varying different sources of foods to get similar nutrients is good and creates variety. These are examples of vegan friendly food groups that contain the essential amino acids.

Lysine is in soy, black beans, quinoa, and pumpkin seeds.
nuts, seeds, and whole grains contain large amounts of histidine.
Cottage cheese and wheat germ contain high quantities of threonine.
Methionine is in, grains, nuts, and seeds.
Valine is in soy, peanuts, mushrooms, whole grains, and vegetables.
Isoleucine is plentiful in lentils, nuts, and seeds.
, soy, beans, and legumes are sources of leucine.
Phenylalanine is in soy, beans, and nuts.
Tryptophan is in most high-protein foods, including wheat germ etc.

A positive about being a vegan is that you learn how to cook better because you learn to experiment and try new recipes that look just as good and even better than those with animal products and get that same satisfaction. the more fruits, veg, nuts grains, tofu, etc you incorporate with such an active lifestyle, it's proven that you will be healthier. If you miss things such as cheese, chocolate, ice cream etc, there are alternatives and they are a bit more costly, but the reality is it will make you want to find/make healthier versions and if not, you see them as treat.
I never said it was impossible to get these things.
Yes those things are high in iron but they are high in non heme-iron which is not as easily absorbed as heme-iron. Also dietary cholesterol has little to no effect on serum cholesterol btw and consuming little amounts of saturated fats is no problem.

Tofu is made of soy btw and only has 9g of protein per 100g and tempeh only has 18g of protein per 100g. A 100g chicken breast has nearly double the amount of protein that tempeh has. Although seitan has a lot of protein it is not as readily available as meat and usually a lot more expensive per gram of protein. The same can also be said for soy and tempeh.

It is an inconvenience that's all.

I believe a balanced diet with both animal and plant based products is the healthiest diet.
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elephantblue
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
I never said it was impossible to get these things.
Yes those things are high in iron but they are high in non heme-iron which is not as easily absorbed as heme-iron. Also dietary cholesterol has little to no effect on serum cholesterol btw and consuming little amounts of saturated fats is no problem.

Tofu is made of soy btw and only has 9g of protein per 100g and tempeh only has 18g of protein per 100g. A 100g chicken breast has nearly double the amount of protein that tempeh has. Although seitan has a lot of protein it is not as readily available as meat and usually a lot more expensive per gram of protein. The same can also be said for soy and tempeh.

It is an inconvenience that's all.

I believe a balanced diet with both animal and plant based products is the healthiest diet.
I would absolutely refer you to the natural protein power of nuts, pulses, grains, beans & veg! It simply isn’t true to say the healthiest diet is one comprised of animal products. The research categorically does not support this.

Too often, the argument about vegans struggling to get protein into their diets is used. It’s a lazy argument - we don’t struggle at all in fact, a common misconception is how much protein we actually need.

‘In actual fact, only around one calorie out of every 10 we consume needs to come from protein in order to meet the body’s needs.’

And if there’s any further ambiguity around how we can satisfy our bodily needs without cruelty, here’s an interesting breakdown ....


Percentage of Calories From Protein (Value Per 100 Grams Edible Portion)
From the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, 2018.9

Fruits
Apple 2%
Banana 5%
Cantaloupe 10%
Grapefruit 8%
Grapes 4%
Honeydew melon 6%
Orange 8%
Papaya 6%
Peach 9%
Pear 3%
Pineapple 4%
Strawberry 8%
Tangerine 6%
Tomato 19%
Watermelon 8%

Grains
Barley 14%
Brown rice 8%
Buckwheat 15%
Millet 12%
Oatmeal 17%
Rye 18%
Wheat germ 26%
Wheat (hard red) 15%
Wild rice 16%

Legumes, Raw
Garbanzo beans 21%
Kidney beans 58%
Lentils 34%
Lima beans 24%
Navy beans 37%
Soybeans 35%
Split peas 29%

Nuts and Seeds
Almonds 15%
Cashews 13%
Filberts 9%
Peanuts 18%
Pumpkin seeds 18%
Sesame seeds 12%
Sunflower seeds 16%
Walnuts (black) 15%

Vegetables, Raw
Artichokes 28%
Beets 15%
Broccoli 33%
Brussels sprouts 31%
Cabbage 24%
Cauliflower 32%
Cucumbers 17%
Eggplant 17%
Green peas 27%
Green pepper 17%
Kale 26%
Lettuce 36%
Mushrooms 56%
Mustard greens 41%
Onions 9%
Potatoes 18%
Spinach 50%
Turnip greens 20%
Watercress 84%
Yams 5%
Zucchini 30%
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Reality Check
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(Original post by elephantblue)
I would absolutely refer you to the natural protein power of nuts, pulses, grains, beans & veg! It simply isn’t true to say the healthiest diet is one comprised of animal products. The research categorically does not support this.

Too often, the argument about vegans struggling to get protein into their diets is used. It’s a lazy argument - we don’t struggle at all in fact, a common misconception is how much protein we actually need.

‘In actual fact, only around one calorie out of every 10 we consume needs to come from protein in order to meet the body’s needs.’

And if there’s any further ambiguity around how we can satisfy our bodily needs without cruelty, here’s an interesting breakdown ....


Percentage of Calories From Protein (Value Per 100 Grams Edible Portion)
From the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, 2018.9

Fruits
Apple 2%
Banana 5%
Cantaloupe 10%
Grapefruit 8%
Grapes 4%
Honeydew melon 6%
Orange 8%
Papaya 6%
Peach 9%
Pear 3%
Pineapple 4%
Strawberry 8%
Tangerine 6%
Tomato 19%
Watermelon 8%

Grains
Barley 14%
Brown rice 8%
Buckwheat 15%
Millet 12%
Oatmeal 17%
Rye 18%
Wheat germ 26%
Wheat (hard red) 15%
Wild rice 16%

Legumes, Raw
Garbanzo beans 21%
Kidney beans 58%
Lentils 34%
Lima beans 24%
Navy beans 37%
Soybeans 35%
Split peas 29%

Nuts and Seeds
Almonds 15%
Cashews 13%
Filberts 9%
Peanuts 18%
Pumpkin seeds 18%
Sesame seeds 12%
Sunflower seeds 16%
Walnuts (black) 15%

Vegetables, Raw
Artichokes 28%
Beets 15%
Broccoli 33%
Brussels sprouts 31%
Cabbage 24%
Cauliflower 32%
Cucumbers 17%
Eggplant 17%
Green peas 27%
Green pepper 17%
Kale 26%
Lettuce 36%
Mushrooms 56%
Mustard greens 41%
Onions 9%
Potatoes 18%
Spinach 50%
Turnip greens 20%
Watercress 84%
Yams 5%
Zucchini 30%
This means literally nothing, because it totally ignores the concept of protein score and completeness.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by CCUupcake123)
I’ve been really into working out recently with all this time on my hands and due to this I’ve been looking into becoming vegan but I would just like to hear some personal views to help me decide for sure

So I was wondering if anyone on here would recommend becoming vegan and what are the benefits in ur personal opinion have u noticed any differences like in your skin, health,body,mood etc I just would like to hear personal opinions rather than scripted views of veganism that’s y I came to student room

Oh and btw I’m not wanting to turn vegan to lose weight I acc want to maintain my wait and instead of losing it become more toned. Do u think it would be suitable for me?

Thank you!
Veganism is a current fashion - a fad. It's an extreme form of eating and like all fads, it will pass. There are no health benefits to veganism, and several drawbacks. It is always preferable to eat a healthy, balanced, omnivorous diet, taking foods from all the food groups in the right quantities for your age and energy expenditure. The NHS has good resources for what constitutes a healthy diet.

You can have a decent diet as a vegan, but it is much harder to do so and unless you're wedded to the fad for some ideological reason, not necessary. Certainly don't do it because you perceive it as somehow 'healthier' - it's not.
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elephantblue
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(Original post by Reality Check)
This means literally nothing, because it totally ignores the concept of protein score and completeness.
There are vegan options which offer ‘complete sources of protein’. My post was simply trying to indicate which readily available ‘vegan’ options are sources of protein which can be easily added to people’s diet - so really does mean quite a lot to those who may not realise it’s only the typical ‘meat’ based diet that can give the body a source of protein.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by elephantblue)
There are vegan options which offer ‘complete sources of protein’. My post was simply trying to indicate which readily available ‘vegan’ options are sources of protein which can be easily added to people’s diet - so really does mean quite a lot to those who may not realise it’s only the typical ‘meat’ based diet that can give the body a source of protein.
Yes, that's a fair point - if people really didn't realise that protein is generally found in all foods, then it was valuable post, albeit spoilt by the inevitable inclusion of the C word in a totally irrelevant fashion.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by elephantblue)
I would absolutely refer you to the natural protein power of nuts, pulses, grains, beans & veg! It simply isn’t true to say the healthiest diet is one comprised of animal products. The research categorically does not support this.

Too often, the argument about vegans struggling to get protein into their diets is used. It’s a lazy argument - we don’t struggle at all in fact, a common misconception is how much protein we actually need.

‘In actual fact, only around one calorie out of every 10 we consume needs to come from protein in order to meet the body’s needs.’

And if there’s any further ambiguity around how we can satisfy our bodily needs without cruelty, here’s an interesting breakdown ....


Percentage of Calories From Protein (Value Per 100 Grams Edible Portion)
From the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, 2018.9

Fruits
Apple 2%
Banana 5%
Cantaloupe 10%
Grapefruit 8%
Grapes 4%
Honeydew melon 6%
Orange 8%
Papaya 6%
Peach 9%
Pear 3%
Pineapple 4%
Strawberry 8%
Tangerine 6%
Tomato 19%
Watermelon 8%

Grains
Barley 14%
Brown rice 8%
Buckwheat 15%
Millet 12%
Oatmeal 17%
Rye 18%
Wheat germ 26%
Wheat (hard red) 15%
Wild rice 16%

Legumes, Raw
Garbanzo beans 21%
Kidney beans 58%
Lentils 34%
Lima beans 24%
Navy beans 37%
Soybeans 35%
Split peas 29%

Nuts and Seeds
Almonds 15%
Cashews 13%
Filberts 9%
Peanuts 18%
Pumpkin seeds 18%
Sesame seeds 12%
Sunflower seeds 16%
Walnuts (black) 15%

Vegetables, Raw
Artichokes 28%
Beets 15%
Broccoli 33%
Brussels sprouts 31%
Cabbage 24%
Cauliflower 32%
Cucumbers 17%
Eggplant 17%
Green peas 27%
Green pepper 17%
Kale 26%
Lettuce 36%
Mushrooms 56%
Mustard greens 41%
Onions 9%
Potatoes 18%
Spinach 50%
Turnip greens 20%
Watercress 84%
Yams 5%
Zucchini 30%
Please state whatever research says that a vegan diet is the healthiest diet.
Sure 1/10 kcals may be enough but thats only enough to prevent protein deficiency, what if you want to gain muscle?
Also I don't get how eating meat is considered cruelty.

Those percentages are meaningless, the highest percentage is watercress and per 100g of watercress there are only 2.4g of protein, more than 10 times less than a chicken breast.
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KatheO11
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
I never said it was impossible to get these things.
Yes those things are high in iron but they are high in non heme-iron which is not as easily absorbed as heme-iron. Also dietary cholesterol has little to no effect on serum cholesterol btw and consuming little amounts of saturated fats is no problem.

Tofu is made of soy btw and only has 9g of protein per 100g and tempeh only has 18g of protein per 100g. A 100g chicken breast has nearly double the amount of protein that tempeh has. Although seitan has a lot of protein it is not as readily available as meat and usually a lot more expensive per gram of protein. The same can also be said for soy and tempeh.

It is an inconvenience that's all.

I believe a balanced diet with both animal and plant based products is the healthiest diet.
yes you are right, non-heme iron is harder to absorb, but this can be made easier if vitamin c is consumed as it helps to allow non-heme iron to be absorbed and many natural sources of vitamin c are from plant based foods, it wouldn't be a strong problem as presented, hence a balanced vegan diet is doable. many high fat nuts do also have saturated fats, they're just not rich in them, so that is a healthier alternative. it is a fact that many saturated fat rich foods are mainly non-vegan anyway and that's an issue. I agree having a balanced diet whatever lifestyle you can do is the most important but there are so many positives in a vegan diet that people dismiss and can make you an overall healthier person based on how you consume.
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Capitalist_Lamb
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(Original post by KatheO11)
yes you are right, non-heme iron is harder to absorb, but this can be made easier if vitamin c is consumed as it helps to allow non-heme iron to be absorbed and many natural sources of vitamin c are from plant based foods, it wouldn't be a strong problem as presented, hence a balanced vegan diet is doable. many high fat nuts do also have saturated fats, they're just not rich in them, so that is a healthier alternative. it is a fact that many saturated fat rich foods are mainly non-vegan anyway and that's an issue. I agree having a balanced diet whatever lifestyle you can do is the most important but there are so many positives in a vegan diet that people dismiss and can make you an overall healthier person based on how you consume.
Why though? Why not just have a healthy varied diet which includes meat, animal products, fruit, veg, etc. I get why people go vegan for ethical reasons but the ones who go Vegan for health benefits I don't get. I always heard the healthiest diet is a varied diet so why put more restrictions on your diet to have a healthier diet? unless for ethical reasons obvs

Edit - Obviously it's the persons choice what they want to eat at the end of the day but I just feel that putting more restrictions on your diet is weird when trying to have a healthy varied diet, each to their own though.
Last edited by Capitalist_Lamb; 6 months ago
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by KatheO11)
yes you are right, non-heme iron is harder to absorb, but this can be made easier if vitamin c is consumed as it helps to allow non-heme iron to be absorbed and many natural sources of vitamin c are from plant based foods, it wouldn't be a strong problem as presented, hence a balanced vegan diet is doable. many high fat nuts do also have saturated fats, they're just not rich in them, so that is a healthier alternative. it is a fact that many saturated fat rich foods are mainly non-vegan anyway and that's an issue. I agree having a balanced diet whatever lifestyle you can do is the most important but there are so many positives in a vegan diet that people dismiss and can make you an overall healthier person based on how you consume.
That's not true according to this study:
https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/73/1/93/4729737

So why not just remove those non-vegan saturated fat filled foods from your diet instead of going full vegan. Also vegan sources of fat also have high amounts of saturated fats such as coconut oil which is 100% saturated fat.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by Capitalist_Lamb)
Why though? Why not just have a healthy varied diet which includes meat, animal products, fruit, veg, etc. I get why people go vegan for ethical reasons but the ones who go Vegan for health benefits I don't get. I always heard the healthiest diet is a varied diet so why put more restrictions on your diet to have a healthier diet? unless for ethical reasons obvs

Edit - Obviously it's the persons choice what they want to eat at the end of the day but I just feel that putting more restrictions on your diet is weird when trying to have a healthy varied diet, each to their own though.
What you heard is correct, there is no health benefit to going vegan.
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