Cdhelp
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#21
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#21
(Original post by 04MR17)
The original question in the first post was:
What subject should I study at degree level to go into teaching?
I do Biology, Maths and Psychology A level!


This was responded to in posts #2,3,5,7. I didn't have much else to add to those comments.
The OP has replied with further questions in posts #4,6,8,12. One of which I responded to in my first post, specifically concerning A Level subjects, not degrees.

The post you quoted was me replying specifically to the question:
Does not having a chemistry or physics a level affect my employability then?

I don't think that a question about specific subject choices at A Level requires repeating details of degree requirements for entering teaching, which several other users have already included further up the thread. I am instead focusing on the matter of A Levels and employability.
In my eyes, meeting the criteria was a given here, given the criteria has already been outlined.
Loool it wasn’t that serious for you to be writing point, evidence explain answers but great
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04MR17
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Cdhelp)
Loool it wasn’t that serious for you to be writing point, evidence explain answers but great
Apologies if I've missed a joke. I have quite a busy morning.
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yhuss98
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#23
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What if i do biology and psychology a levels, then do biomedical science? Then would i be able to do an SKE in chemistry or something before starting the PGCE itself
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username5359312
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#24
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#24
What a lot of people don't realise is you don't need to study what you want to eventually teach at UG level. For example, if you were to pursue Biology, but want to take a PGCE in Geography, you might need to take a summer induction course but it's still possible.

In addition, once you have completed a PGCE you obtain Qualified Teacher Status and are actually qualified to teach any subject. For example, I know someone who trained on a music PGCE but got a job as a geography teacher.

Don't define your UG degree choice by your want of teaching a certain subject. It's a long way away and you might change your mind regarding career paths or find that teaching isn't for you. That being said, it'll be a lot more difficult to get onto a Chemistry PGCE with a Sociology degree in comparison to those who studied towards a science degree.
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Get into Teaching
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#25
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I'll reiterate my point from earlier. You don't need to, but, training in a subject you are passionate about goes long way and kids will see this when you are at the front of the class. If you are passionate about a subject the students will see this and bounce off your enthusiasm each lesson.

Feel free to get in contact with Get Into Teaching and you will receive more support on this.

Dan
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mgi
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#26
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#26
Don't do it!!
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yhuss98
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#27
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(Original post by mgi)
Don't do it!!
Why so? I feel like as long as you establish control over the class you’ll be fine? Tell me your experience plz
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mgi
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#28
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(Original post by yhuss98)
Why so? I feel like as long as you establish control over the class you’ll be fine? Tell me your experience plz
I have a PGCE. i found that the biggest problem with teaching was the ridiculous relentless workload and the ridiculously low salaries. Building positive relationships with the students was the bit i actually did very well. Most school managers and leaders i met were workshy buck passers tbh always trying to please the kids and students at the expense of good diligent classroom teachers. I got fed up and quit the profession for good.
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yhuss98
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#29
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(Original post by mgi)
I have a PGCE. i found that the biggest problem with teaching was the ridiculous relentless workload and the ridiculously low salaries. Building positive relationships with the students was the bit i actually did very well. Most school managers and leaders i met were workshy buck passers tbh always trying to please the kids and students at the expense of good diligent classroom teachers. I got fed up and quit the profession for good.
Could you tell me how many hrs you’d worked in a day? And on weekends too? And how were holidays in terms of workload?
How many years were u in the profession? I heard that marking etc. are draining but you get quick at it eventually after 2 years (like with practice). Would u agree?
Sorry for the Qs.. I really want to teach (Bio as my main then Chem as my second) so I know marking tests won’t be too long as the answer is pretty black and white (unlike RE would be v v long) so that’s one of the main reasons I want to teach the sciences. Thank u.
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mgi
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#30
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#30
(Original post by yhuss98)
Could you tell me how many hrs you’d worked in a day? And on weekends too? And how were holidays in terms of workload?
How many years were u in the profession? I heard that marking etc. are draining but you get quick at it eventually after 2 years (like with practice). Would u agree?
Sorry for the Qs.. I really want to teach (Bio as my main then Chem as my second) so I know marking tests won’t be too long as the answer is pretty black and white (unlike RE would be v v long) so that’s one of the main reasons I want to teach the sciences. Thank u.
I taught biology and GCSE sciences up to A level for more than 4 years. You only really get summer holidays off, 6 weeks. That's what non teachers don't understand!
Marking tests is not black and white. Long and short answers and 30 sets of student papers to wade through! If you took a fictional 2 minutes to mark one student's entire paper then that's 2 hours already!
I reckon i did, on average, 65+ hours a week.!
Hours: 8am-4pm. Teaching duties, may get 45 mins for llunch.
Then lessons also have to be planned. This means evenings and weekends have to be used.
8 classes of 30 students books needed marking every 2-3 weeks- more time needed at the weekend. Tests and exams need to be prepared, set and marked. More time after school and at weekends. Record keeping needs to be done of all marks awarded and reports need issuing half termly. Meetings to attend after school on occasions. Form tutor duties to do before the start of the first lesson in the morning.
Parents evenings for each year group for each academic year.
Staff meetings to attend!
Phone calls home regarding poor student behaviour or progress. Occasional lunchtime and afterschool duties to do.
Exhaustion, illness and stress inevitably set in. School managers generally awful. Had to put 2 school leaders in their place.
Then i quit-one of the best things i ever did. I am not surprised that there are teacher shortages! I was,in effect ,working for about £10 per hour. Ridiculous.
You will really have to insist on managing your workload! Eventually i stopped taking work home at all and ignored presumptuous school leaders. They try to play mind games even when they know how massive the workload and pressures are.
Last edited by mgi; 5 days ago
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