What is the government's aim?

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username4867806
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The only aim I can see at the moment is that they hope people gain immunity and that it passes slowly throughout the population to prevent the NHS being overwhelmed.

The lockdown is nowhere near severe enough and wasn't put in place quick enough to have any massive impact on the spread, shown as the virus is clearly still spreading in the population even a month after lockdown began.

What are they actually aiming for now?
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Neilos
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(Original post by Treetop321)
The only aim I can see at the moment is that they hope people gain immunity and that it passes slowly throughout the population to prevent the NHS being overwhelmed.

The lockdown is nowhere near severe enough and wasn't put in place quick enough to have any massive impact on the spread, shown as the virus is clearly still spreading in the population even a month after lockdown began.

What are they actually aiming for now?
The same thing most of the world is aiming for, and what appears to be the most sensible option... attempting to get the country running as best it can, while ensuring the health service isn't overwhelmed, until a treatment can be found for the virus.

And the lockdown is having a huge impact on the spread. There was no realistic chance of removing it from circulation within the space of a month, but the speed of spread has been significantly reduced.
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username4867806
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(Original post by Neilos)
The same thing most of the world is aiming for, and what appears to be the most sensible option... attempting to get the country running as best it can, while ensuring the health service isn't overwhelmed, until a treatment can be found for the virus.

And the lockdown is having a huge impact on the spread. There was no realistic chance of removing it from circulation within the space of a month, but the speed of spread has been significantly reduced.
So the speed of the spread has been reduced. What then though? What happens when the current rules are relaxed?
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Neilos
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(Original post by Treetop321)
So the speed of the spread has been reduced. What then though? What happens when the current rules are relaxed?
Modelling indicates reduced restrictions = higher spread. Ideally, countries will want to find a balance between functionality and sufficiently reduced spread, so some restrictions will remain, some might be lifted, others may come and go.
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username1799249
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(Original post by Treetop321)
So the speed of the spread has been reduced. What then though? What happens when the current rules are relaxed?
Relax the rules of things you can do whilst still keeping in place measures to prevent the spread. E.g. social distancing, face mask wearing etc etc.
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username5133584
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As most people have said, the purpose of the ‘lockdown’, in particular social distancing measures, is to protect the NHS by reducing the number of individuals requiring care at the same time by slowing down the spread of the virus. The aim of this was to make sure everybody isn’t requiring hospital beds or ICUs at the same time to stop hospitals becoming overwhelmed.
Going into any type of lockdown for however long doesn’t mean the virus will just go away, that’s not how it works. Only it itself can do that or with the introduction of a vaccine.. which will take while to be approved and distributed worldwide.
In particular, I don’t think a strict lockdown is effective when you’re not testing enough people and don’t even know who is sick. Countries testing people effectively and isolating them accordingly have had less deaths- the best policy would be to test as many people as possible, quarantine the sick and isolate anybody who may have come into contact with them. Not shove everybody into a quarantine scenario and simply not test enough people, and only offer tests to those with symptoms. My dad was offered tests as he’s a key worker, but for us to get them too we would have to be showing symptoms. It’s ridiculous.
Some places in China went into full lockdown and they’re seeing a second wave. The best way to handle this is through mass testing, which our country is behind on. We could be isolating the sick with the healthy for all we know.
Basically we can’t stay inside forever and just hope the virus will go away thus they will start lifting measures when deemed safe to do so, starting with things that pose the less likely risk of increasing the spread again such as seeing a small number of family members and friends.
Last edited by username5133584; 8 months ago
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It’s Jacob
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Their aim has not be published. They like to think a lockdown can be in place until a vaccine but that could be over a year away and it is impossible to continue in lockdown for that long. The exit strategy should be becoming like Sweden.
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Napp
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(Original post by It’s Jacob)
Their aim has not be published. They like to think a lockdown can be in place until a vaccine but that could be over a year away and it is impossible to continue in lockdown for that long. The exit strategy should be becoming like Sweden.
Do nothing and see what happens?
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It’s Jacob
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(Original post by Napp)
Do nothing and see what happens?
Listen to the interviews with their health officer, it is more nuanced than that but in effect, yes. I would rather vulnerable people die than the lockdown. The lockdown does not prevent death directly, it delays the spread to allow ICU capacity to increase and cope with the severe cases when people catch it later. ICU capacity has now increased to the point where it can be given to the people without underlying conditions and a severe reaction to covid over vulnerable people.

Lift the lockdown, prioritise care for those without underlying conditions and say goodbye to the vulnerable. I see it as survival of the fittest.
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username1799249
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(Original post by It’s Jacob)
I would rather vulnerable people die than the lockdown.
Cool - so can we count on you to tell my brother's wife that she should die, or my mum, or dad, or our friends and colleagues who are on immunosuppressant drugs, that they should all just die because the lock down is a bit inconvenient? Could you really say that to the face of a total stranger and their family?

You have no sole.
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Napp
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(Original post by It’s Jacob)
Listen to the interviews with their health officer, it is more nuanced than that but in effect, yes. I would rather vulnerable people die than the lockdown. The lockdown does not prevent death directly, it delays the spread to allow ICU capacity to increase and cope with the severe cases when people catch it later. ICU capacity has now increased to the point where it can be given to the people without underlying conditions and a severe reaction to covid over vulnerable people.

Lift the lockdown, prioritise care for those without underlying conditions and say goodbye to the vulnerable. I see it as survival of the fittest.
I imagine the vulnerable people you "would rather die" might object somewhat.
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Drewski
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(Original post by ByEeek)
You have no sole.
Just means he can't walk in your footsteps.
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